To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Seaplane Take‐off Weights: Part I.—The Factors on which the Maximum Take‐off Performance Depends

E.T. Jones, M.Eng. (Scientific officer on the staff of the Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment, Felixstowe.)

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 December 1934

Abstract

BECAUSE of its ability to take off at the maximum weight that it can sustain in the air at sea level, the landplane has always had a greater range than the seaplane. With the advent of the retractable undercarriage, the landplane has now the added advantage of a much higher cruising speed and hence a further increase of range over the seaplane. The retraction of wing‐tip floats on the boat type of seaplane would compensate to some extent for the retractable undercarriage, but it is certain that we must increase the ratio of maximum take‐off weight to maximum flying weight before we can materially increase the range of all types of seaplanes.

Citation

Jones, E.T. (1934), "Seaplane Take‐off Weights: Part I.—The Factors on which the Maximum Take‐off Performance Depends", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 6 No. 12, pp. 330-332. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb029883

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1934, MCB UP Limited