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The 5‐Cylinder Walter N.Z.60 Engine: Interchangeability of Parts Characterises a Popular Czechoslovakian Group of Engines with a 60–240 h.p. Power Range

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Publication date: 1 April 1929

Abstract

THE Walter N.Z. 60 engine is the holder of several records and is familiar in Europe through its use in the Avia B.H10 and B.H.11 and Dutch Pander light aeroplanes and is being introduced into the United States by the Spartan Aircraft Corporation of Oklahama. It forms one of a scries of air‐cooled engines of 60, 85, 120 and 240 h.p. which are characterised by the interchangeability of their parts. Features common to the series are the two‐piece crankshaft and master‐rod borne on the crankshaft by ball or roller bearings. The engines are made at Prague by the Czechoslovakian firm, J. Walter and Company, who also hold licences for the manufacture of the air‐cooled Bristol “Jupiter” and B.M.W. water‐cooled engines. The firm have been making internal‐combustion engines for motor‐cars since 1896 and after the war went into the aero engine business also.

Citation

(1929), "The 5‐Cylinder Walter N.Z.60 Engine: Interchangeability of Parts Characterises a Popular Czechoslovakian Group of Engines with a 60–240 h.p. Power Range", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 1 No. 4, pp. 135-135. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb029136

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1929, MCB UP Limited