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Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Employment Relations: The Theory and Practice of Organisational Change

David Goss (Portsmouth Polytechnic)
Derek Adam‐Smith (Portsmouth Polytechnic)

Management Research News

ISSN: 0140-9174

Article publication date: 1 May 1992

Abstract

It seems clear that one of the challenges of change to be faced by organisations in the 1990s will be that of dealing effectively with the impact of AIDS. According to Trebilcock (1989) the vast majority (90%) of those in the developed countries who will contract the HIV virus will be in employment. At present the US Centre for Disease Control estimates that one in 250 people in the US is infected with the HIV virus and that, in 1991, AIDS‐related illness cost US industry more than $50 billion (Brown 1991). This, according to Kohl et al (1990) may mean that there may be 1.5 million Americans infected with the virus, with an expectation of well over 300,000 ‘active’ AIDS cases by 1993 (see also Ross and Middlebrook, 1990).

Citation

Goss, D. and Adam‐Smith, D. (1992), "Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Employment Relations: The Theory and Practice of Organisational Change", Management Research News, Vol. 15 No. 5/6, pp. 13-15. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb028210

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1992, MCB UP Limited