To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

INFORMATION SHARING AND GROUP CONFLICT: GOING BEYOND DECISION MAKING TO UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS OF INFORMATION SHARING ON GROUP PERFORMANCE

Neta A. Moye (Vanderbilt University)
Claus W. Langfred (Washington University)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 April 2004

Abstract

We investigated the role of task and relationship conflict as mediators of the relationship between information sharing and group performance. We suggest that, in addition to the commonly studied effect of conflict on information sharing, the reverse causal direction is theoretically likely and relevant in today's business climate. Specifically, we hypothesize that information sharing will reduce both task and relationship conflict with beneficial effects on team performance in established groups. We also explore boundary conditions to these conflict‐reducing effects of information sharing, suggesting that the lower a group's task interdependence, the more information sharing reduces task conflict, and the lower a group's average general mental ability, the more information sharing reduces relationship conflict. Analysis of data from 38 groups supported our expectations, revealing the expected negative relationships between information sharing and both task and relationship conflict, as well as the expected moderating effects of task interdependence and general mental ability.

Keywords

Citation

Moye, N.A. and Langfred, C.W. (2004), "INFORMATION SHARING AND GROUP CONFLICT: GOING BEYOND DECISION MAKING TO UNDERSTAND THE EFFECTS OF INFORMATION SHARING ON GROUP PERFORMANCE", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 15 No. 4, pp. 381-410. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022919

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited