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THE SMART NEGOTIATOR: COGNITIVE ABILITY AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN NEGOTIATION

Ingrid Smithey Fulmer (Michigan State University Eli Broad Graduate School of Management, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48224–1122. (fulmer@msu.edu))
Bruce Barry (Vanderbilt University)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 March 2004

6435

Abstract

What does it mean to be a “smart” negotiator? Few scholars have paid much attention to this question, a puzzling omission given copious research suggesting that cognitive ability (the type of intelligence commonly measured by psychometric tests) predicts individual performance in many related contexts. In addition to cognitive ability, other definitions of intelligence (e.g., emotional intelligence) have been proposed that theoretically could influence negotiation outcomes. Aiming to stimulate renewed attention to the role of intelligence in negotiation, we develop theoretical propositions linking multiple forms of intelligence to information acquisition, decision making, and tactical choices in bargaining contexts. We outline measurement issues relevant to empirical work on this topic, and discuss implications for negotiation teaching and practice.

Keywords

Citation

Smithey Fulmer, I. and Barry, B. (2004), "THE SMART NEGOTIATOR: COGNITIVE ABILITY AND EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN NEGOTIATION", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 15 No. 3, pp. 245-272. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022914

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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