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WHEN WILL GRIEVANTS DESIRE VOICE?: A TEST OF SITUATIONAL, MOTIVATIONAL, AND ATTRIBUTIONAL EXPLANATIONS

Bruce Barry (Vanderbilt University)
Debra L. Shapiro (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Publication date: 1 February 2000

Abstract

Justice research has established that voice enhances procedural justice—a phenomenon known as the ‘voice effect’—through both instrumental and non‐instrumental mechanisms. However, limited research attention has been devoted to the underlying motivational bases for the operation of one or the other explanatory mechanism in a given situation. We report the findings of two laboratory studies examining situational, motivational, and attributional underpinnings for the voice effect. We found that motivation to voice varied with characteristics of the authority to whom a grievance is directed. In both studies, an interaction revealed that non‐instrumental motivation for voice is more important when instrumental motivation is lacking or unavailable. In Study 2, we introduce the role of social attributions into research on the voice effect, finding that grievants' judgments about their objectives in using voice vary with the attributions they make about the motives behind the authority's actions. We discuss implications of our findings for both theory and practice.

Citation

Barry, B. and Shapiro, D.L. (2000), "WHEN WILL GRIEVANTS DESIRE VOICE?: A TEST OF SITUATIONAL, MOTIVATIONAL, AND ATTRIBUTIONAL EXPLANATIONS", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 11 No. 2, pp. 106-134. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022837

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited