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ANTECEDENTS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF CAUCUSING IN COMMUNITY MEDIATION

Gary L. Welton (Grove City College)
Dean G. Pruitt (State University of New York at Buffalo)
Neil B. McGillicuddy (Research Institute on Addictions, Buffalo, NY)
Carol A. Ippolito (Arvin/Calspan Corporation, Buffalo, NY)
Jo M. Zubek (State University of New York at Buffalo)

International Journal of Conflict Management

ISSN: 1044-4068

Article publication date: 1 April 1992

Abstract

This observational and interview study investigated the role of caucusing (private meetings between the mediator and a disputant) in community mediation. The results from 73 cases at two mediation centers indicate that mediators are more likely to caucus when disputants have a history of escalation, are hostile toward each other during the hearing, and fail to engage in joint problem solving. Caucus sessions were found to discourage direct hostility between the disputants but to encourage indirect hostility. There was also evidence that caucus sessions foster disputant flexibility and problem solving between the disputant and the mediator. However, no relationship was found between the occurrence or nature of caucusing and the likelihood of agreement or the quality of the mediated outcome.

Citation

Welton, G.L., Pruitt, D.G., McGillicuddy, N.B., Ippolito, C.A. and Zubek, J.M. (1992), "ANTECEDENTS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF CAUCUSING IN COMMUNITY MEDIATION", International Journal of Conflict Management, Vol. 3 No. 4, pp. 303-317. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb022717

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1992, MCB UP Limited