Air traffic volumes in Ireland increase by 10 per cent

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology

ISSN: 0002-2667

Article publication date: 1 October 2004

Keywords

Citation

(2004), "Air traffic volumes in Ireland increase by 10 per cent", Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, Vol. 76 No. 5. https://doi.org/10.1108/aeat.2004.12776eab.009

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Air traffic volumes in Ireland increase by 10 per cent

Air traffic volumes in Ireland increase by 10 per cent

Keywords: Air safety, Aircraft, Air traffic control

The Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) recently announced that it had recorded a EUR6m profit on its operations in 2003. The IAA's Annual Report and accounts for 2003 shows an improved financial performance reflecting a growth in international traffic levels during 2003.

The IAA is the semi state body which regulates Irish aviation safety standards and provides air traffic control services in Irish airspace. IAA revenue primarily comes from charging aircraft that pass through Irish airspace.

IAA turnover in 2003 increased by 15.5 per cent to EUR110.6 million, up from EUR95.8 million in 2002. Over 80 per cent of turnover is revenue from aircraft that did not land in Ireland, but used Irish airspace en route to other destinations. Profit before tax at EUR5.96 million in 2003 compared to EUR4.78 million in 2002, reflecting the economic recovery in the aviation industry. Overall air traffic volumes utilising Irish airspace increased by 9.7 per cent.

IAA Chairman, Mr. Donal Geaney commented: “Following two challenging years for the industry, I am pleased to report that the Authority recorded an improved financial performance reflecting a growth in international traffic levels during 2003. This was evidenced in each of the Authority's main areas of operation”.

Key areas of operation were as follows:

  • en route traffic (i.e. all aircraft using Irish airspace whether landing or en route elsewhere) rose by 9.7 per cent to 272,000 movements;

  • terminal traffic (i.e. aircraft landing at the three main Irish airports) rose by 2.4 per cent to 270,000 movements

  • Shanwick airspace communications traffic rose by 4.5 per cent to 334,000 contacts (aircraft over the Atlantic are controlled mainly from UK Prestwick and Canada; the IAA radio station at Ballygirreen, Co. Clare provides the vital radio link between air traffic controllers and pilots.)

Significantly, in 2003 the IAA started operations from its new air traffic management system installed at Shannon and Dublin airports. Speaking at the IAA AGM, Chief Executive, Mr Eamonn Brennan said: “The EUR115m investment in the new national air traffic management system will help the authority to significantly increase future productivity. The new system will position the IAA to handle traffic increases which are likely to arise in the future”.

Last August a major agreement on North Atlantic airspace was concluded between the Irish and UK departments of transport. Building on that agreement the IAA entered into a significant co-operation pact with its counterpart, the UK National Air Traffic Services (NATS). From January 2005, the IAA will provide air traffic control services in a new 95,000 km2 block of airspace – NOTA (Northern oceanic transition area), off the north-west coast of Ireland. Control of NOTA extends the IAA's responsibilities to a total airspace block of some 450,000 km2, the gateway for over 90 per cent of air traffic between Europe and North America.