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Buzz: A Theory, Illustrated in Toronto and Chicago

Can Tocqueville Karaoke? Global Contrasts of Citizen Participation, the Arts and Development

ISBN: 978-1-78190-736-8, eISBN: 978-1-78190-737-5

ISSN: 1479-3520

Publication date: 15 July 2014

Abstract

The rise of arts and culture is transforming citizen politics. Though new to many social scientists, this is a commonplace for many policy makers. We seek to overcome this divide by joining culture and the arts with classic concepts of political analysis. We offer an analytical framework incorporating the politics of cultural policy alongside the typical political and economic concerns. Our framework synthesizes several research streams that combine in global factors driving the articulation of culture into political/economic processes. The contexts of Toronto and Chicago are explored as both enhanced the arts dramatically, but Toronto engaged artists qua citizens, while Chicago did not.

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Acknowledgements

Acknowledgments

The authors thank for their helpful comments Herman Boschken, Meghan Kallman, Sarah Cappeliez, and Stephen Sawyer. Sarah Cappeliez and Nicholas Musillami provided valuable research assistance. This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

Citation

Silver, D. and Clark, T.N. (2014), "Buzz: A Theory, Illustrated in Toronto and Chicago", Can Tocqueville Karaoke? Global Contrasts of Citizen Participation, the Arts and Development (Research in Urban Policy, Vol. 11), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 175-220. https://doi.org/10.1108/S1479-352020140000011025

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014 Emerald Group Publishing Limited