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Samuel Bailey and the question of his ‘influence’: a sceptical view

English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists

ISBN: 978-0-85724-061-3, eISBN: 978-0-85724-062-0

ISSN: 0743-4154

Publication date: 23 December 2010

Abstract

Elie Halévy essentially expressed the view recorded by James Mill in his anonymously written ‘On the Nature, Measures, and Causes of Value’7 that the first chapter of the Critical Dissertation relating to the nature of value ‘contains not an assertion, who which, as far as ideas politico-economical are concerned, Mr. Ricardo would not have assented; it contains, not indeed, as far as such ideas are concerned, an assertion which is not implied in the propositions which Mr. Ricardo has put forth. It is a criticism on some of Mr. Ricardo's forms of expression…’ ([J. Mill], 1826a, p. 157). The justification for the Ricardian reaction is clear enough, as I shall now show.8

Citation

Hollander, S. (2010), "Samuel Bailey and the question of his ‘influence’: a sceptical view", Allington, N.F.B. and Thompson, N.W. (Ed.) English, Irish and Subversives among the Dismal Scientists (Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology, Vol. 28 Part 2), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 153-198. https://doi.org/10.1108/S0743-4154(2010)000028B010

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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