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Dementia: towards a perceptual control theory perspective

Phil McEvoy (Six Degrees Social Enterprise CIC, Salford, UK)
John Eden (Six Degrees Social Enterprise CIC, Salford, UK)
Lydia Morris (University of Manchester, Manchester, UK)
Warren Mansell (University of Manchester, Manchester, UK)

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

ISSN: 1471-7794

Article publication date: 12 December 2016

153

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the psychosocial experiences of people living with dementia using a perceptual control theory (PCT) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual paper.

Findings

The paper suggests that people with dementia may control their perceptions by using four modes of control: control, automatic, passive observation and imagination.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights how a perceived sense of “too little” or “too much” control can create psychological and emotional distress, as people with dementia seek to respond to the changing contextual circumstances of their lives. However, more work needs to be done to develop specific PCT informed strategies that may serve the goal of helping people who are living with dementia to maximise their functioning and alleviate their distress.

Originality/value

The potential benefits of adopting a PCT perspective to understand the experiences of people living with dementia have only been explored in a relatively superficial way. This paper is a first attempt to develop a more considered analysis.

Keywords

Citation

McEvoy, P., Eden, J., Morris, L. and Mansell, W. (2016), "Dementia: towards a perceptual control theory perspective", Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Vol. 17 No. 4, pp. 229-238. https://doi.org/10.1108/QAOA-03-2015-0013

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2016, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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