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The relation between accounting information-based firm risk proxies and cost of equity capital across countries

Tony Kang (Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma, United States)
Mark Kohlbeck (School of Accounting, Florida Atlantic University, Florida, United States)
Yong Yoo (Business School, Korea University, Korea, Republic of)

Pacific Accounting Review

ISSN: 0114-0582

Article publication date: 2 February 2015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate international variability in the pricing of accounting information using ex ante cost of equity capital estimates. Prior literature shows that financial statement amounts are relevant for investor decisions only when there is appropriate economic and legal infrastructure (Ball, 2001).

Design/methodology/approach

Accrual quality and accounting loss are focussed upon as indicators of firm risk in financial statements.

Findings

The evidence suggests that accounting information is factored into ex ante cost of equity capital in countries with strong economic and legal infrastructures but not in those with weak infrastructures. Findings support Ball’s notion that the role financial reporting plays in a capital market depends on the strength of economic and legal infrastructure.

Originality/value

Findings support Ball’s notion that the role financial reporting plays in a capital market depends on the strength of economic and legal infrastructure.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors appreciate discussions with and comments received on earlier versions of this paper from Matthew Magilke and Wayne Thomas.

Citation

Kang, T., Kohlbeck, M. and Yoo, Y. (2015), "The relation between accounting information-based firm risk proxies and cost of equity capital across countries", Pacific Accounting Review, Vol. 27 No. 1, pp. 69-94. https://doi.org/10.1108/PAR-03-2013-0019

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited