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Actors with intellectual disabilities in mental health simulation training

Chris Attoe (Maudsley Simulation, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Gregoire Billon (Maudsley Simulation, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Samantha Riches (Mental Health in Learning Disabilities, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Karina Marshall-Tate (Mental Health in Learning Disabilities, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
James Wheildon (Baked Bean Company, London, UK)
Sean Cross (Maudsley Simulation, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice

ISSN: 1755-6228

Article publication date: 10 July 2017

Abstract

Purpose

People with intellectual disabilities experience poorer health outcomes than the general population, and a significantly increased risk of mental health comorbidity. Their access to healthcare has been consistently shown as inadequate, and their access to mental health support is still largely wanting. Adequate training and education should improve these shortcomings but there is limited evidence available as to the best way to achieve this. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the co-production and co-delivery of a simulation training course to support healthcare professionals to provide care for people with intellectual disabilities, with a particular focus on their mental health needs. This training was designed with actors with intellectual disabilities, who participated as simulated patients in scenarios during the course and subsequently provided feedback on their experience.

Findings

This paper focusses on the positive experiences of the simulated patients, reporting on and interpreting their direct feedback on their experience of contributing to the development and delivery of the course and being involved as co-educators.

Originality/value

It is highlighted that the co-production and delivery of this simulation training with people with intellectual disabilities has the potential to realise some of the key principles called upon when attempting to improve how they are treated, by illustrating concrete participation, independence, and access to fulfilling lives. The value and benefits of interprofessional education to achieve these educational aims is further highlighted, particularly for the potential to generate a sense of shared responsibility within mainstream services in caring for people with intellectual disabilities.

Keywords

Citation

Attoe, C., Billon, G., Riches, S., Marshall-Tate, K., Wheildon, J. and Cross, S. (2017), "Actors with intellectual disabilities in mental health simulation training", The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, Vol. 12 No. 4, pp. 272-278. https://doi.org/10.1108/JMHTEP-04-2017-0024

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited