From Lima to Paris – why a global agreement to reduce CO2 emissions is needed

Walter Leal-Filho (Faculty of Life Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Hamburg, Germany)

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management

ISSN: 1756-8692

Publication date: 16 March 2015

Citation

Leal-Filho, W. (2015), "From Lima to Paris – why a global agreement to reduce CO2 emissions is needed", International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Vol. 7 No. 1. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCCSM-12-2014-0143

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited


From Lima to Paris – why a global agreement to reduce CO2 emissions is needed

Article Type: Editorial From: International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, Volume 7, Issue 1

Welcome to a further issue of the International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management. In this editorial, I would like to comment on the results of the latest Climate Summit. The 20th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) and the 10th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the Meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP) took place from 1 to 14 December 2014 in Lima, Peru. It lasted two days longer than planned.

The Lima Summit was seen as a crucial moment to reach a climate agreement in 2015. But even though the Presidency of COP20-CMP10 led the process and endeavoured to take actions on the principles of transparency and inclusiveness to build trust and confidence, the limited degree of progress reached was regarded as frustrating. But at least a plan was agreed, which has prevented things from being stalled.

The plan, agreed on the very last day of the meeting, is deemed as an important first step towards a climate change agreement due to be finalised in Paris in 2015. Formally titled “the Lima Call for Climate Action” represents the first steps towards an agreement which needs to be closed in Paris at COP 21, to be held on 30 November 2015-11 December 2015. Among other things, the proposals call on countries to reveal how they will cut carbon pollution, ideally by March 2015. A major issue left unresolved for Paris is the burden for cutting greenhouse gas emissions: there is real agreement about who should pay, and how much.

The willingness to enter into agreements is necessary within the context of complex global negotiation processes, especially when these are related to the reduction of carbon emissions. It is hoped that the interests from individual countries will not prevent a final agreement to be reached in Paris.

Enjoy your reading.

Walter Leal-Filho, Editor