Clinical governance in Dutch hospitals

Daan Botje (Organisation and Quality of Health Care, NIVEL – Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands)
Thomas Plochg (Department of Social Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Niek S. Klazinga (Department of Social Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Cordula Wagner (Department for Organisation and Quality of Health Care, NIVEL, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands)

Clinical Governance: An International Journal

ISSN: 1477-7274

Publication date: 30 September 2014

Abstract

Purpose

For accountability purposes, performance information sharing and clear divisions of responsibilities between medical specialists and executive boards are critical. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether these aspects of clinical governance have been taken up by executive boards and medical specialists in the Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study aimed to explore the information-sharing between medical specialists and executive boards in Dutch hospitals as one key aspect of clinical governance. Between November 2010 and February 2011, 67 medical staff board chairs and 40 chief executive officers completed an online questionnaire concerning information-sharing and the clinical governance practices within their respective hospitals.

Findings

Almost all respondents acknowledged the importance of information-sharing. However, the actual sharing differed per type of performance information. Policy/management information was shared more often than patient care information. Similarly, medical specialists differ in the degree of responsibility the take for specific clinical governance tasks. Almost all were involved in managing complication registries (99 per cent), while few managed hospital accreditation (55 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

With executive boards and medical specialists being increasingly dependent of a shared budget, they have an extra incentive to share information and to take up clinical governance tasks. The study showed that Dutch medical specialists are sharing many types of performance information with the executive board, but that this should be increased to comply with the codes. Thus far, few hospital managers in the study have formalised this in an information protocol, which is potentially the next step for other hospital staff to incorporate as well. Those who have an information protocol seem to be aware of the business case for quality.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt to explore to what extent Dutch medical specialists share performance information with their respective executive boards and take up clinical governance tasks.

Keywords

Citation

Botje, D., Plochg, T., S. Klazinga, N. and Wagner, C. (2014), "Clinical governance in Dutch hospitals", Clinical Governance: An International Journal, Vol. 19 No. 4, pp. 322-331. https://doi.org/10.1108/CGIJ-08-2014-0028

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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