Automated prompting technologies in rehabilitation and at home

Brian O'Neill (Based at the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust, Glasgow, UK)
Catherine Best (Based at the Department of Psychology, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK)
Alex Gillespie (Based at the London School of Economics, London, UK)
Lauren O'Neill (Based at the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust, Glasgow, UK)

Social Care and Neurodisability

ISSN: 2042-0919

Publication date: 15 February 2013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the efficacy of an interactive verbal prompting technology (Guide) on supporting the morning routine. Data have already established the efficacy of such prompting during procedural tasks, but the efficacy of such prompting in tasks with procedural and motivational elements remains unexamined. Such tasks, such as getting out of bed in the morning and engaging in personal care, are often the focus of rehabilitation goals.

Design/methodology/approach

A single‐n study with a male (age 61) who had severe cognitive impairment and was having trouble completing the morning routine. An A−B−A′−B′−A″−B″ design was used, with the intervention phase occurring both in an in‐patient unit (B, B′) and in the participant's own home (B″).

Findings

Interactive verbal prompting technology (Guide) significantly reduced support worker prompting and number of errors in the in‐patient setting and in the participant's own home.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that interactive verbal prompting can be used to support motivational tasks such as getting out of bed and the morning routine. This study used a single subject experimental design and the results need to be confirmed in a larger sample.

Originality/value

This is the first report of use of interactive verbal prompting technology to support rehabilitation of a motivational task. It is also the first study to evaluate Guide in a domestic context.

Keywords

Citation

O'Neill, B., Best, C., Gillespie, A. and O'Neill, L. (2013), "Automated prompting technologies in rehabilitation and at home", Social Care and Neurodisability, Vol. 4 No. 1, pp. 17-28. https://doi.org/10.1108/20420911311302281

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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