Contemporary Cleopatras: the business ethics of female Egyptian managers

Liesl Riddle (School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA)
Meghana Ayyagari (School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA)

Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues

ISSN: 1753-7983

Publication date: 23 August 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore gender differences in ethical attitudes along two dimensions: perceived ethical strategies for career advancement, or upward‐influence ethics; and perceived ethical roles of business in society and the natural environment, or business social and environmental responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a variance decomposition procedure, the paper identifies substantive differences in the ethical perceptions of Egyptian male and female managers.

Findings

Female managers find more covert upward‐influence strategies – strategies that are less aboveboard and transparent – acceptable and eschew overt upward‐influence tactics – strategies that are aboveboard and transparent. Female managers also envision a larger role for business in society, particularly in terms of social responsibilities than do male managers.

Research limitations/implications

The study is exploratory, employing a small sample in a single country.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to ongoing debates about the role that a person's gender plays in influencing his/her ethical perspective, examining the issue in a developing country context. This paper's contribution is also methodological, demonstrating how variance decomposition can be used to examine these issues.

Keywords

Citation

Riddle, L. and Ayyagari, M. (2011), "Contemporary Cleopatras: the business ethics of female Egyptian managers", Education, Business and Society: Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues, Vol. 4 No. 3, pp. 167-192. https://doi.org/10.1108/17537981111159957

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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