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The development and future of deaf forensic mental health services

Simon Gibbon (Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist at St Andrews Healthcare, Northampton, UK)
Colin Doyle (Clinical Service Development Manager at St Andrews Healthcare, Northampton, UK)

The British Journal of Forensic Practice

ISSN: 1463-6646

Article publication date: 16 August 2011

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the need for and development of specialist deaf secure mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a review article; it begins by giving a brief overview of deafness and the relationship between deafness, mental health problems and offending. Following this, relevant literature and Department of Health (DoH) guidance is summarised and a description of the current UK services is given.

Findings

In 2001, Young et al. highlighted the needs of deaf mentally disordered offenders and the requirement for specialist forensic mental health services for this group. Since then several DoH guidance documents have been published that, amongst other things, highlighted the need to develop deaf forensic mental health services. There have now been substantial service developments in this area but substantial gaps remain – most notably, a lack of specialist mental health provision for deaf prisoners.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the development and future of deaf forensic mental health services.

Keywords

Citation

Gibbon, S. and Doyle, C. (2011), "The development and future of deaf forensic mental health services", The British Journal of Forensic Practice, Vol. 13 No. 3, pp. 191-196. https://doi.org/10.1108/14636641111157832

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited