To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Problem Solving Therapy for People with Personality Disorders: An Overview

Mary McMurran (Division of Psychiatry, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nottingham)
Arthur Nezu (Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA)
Christine Nezu (Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA)

Mental Health Review Journal

ISSN: 1361-9322

Article publication date: 1 June 2008

Abstract

The National Institute for Mental Health in England's (2003) paper, Personality Disorder: No Longer a Diagnosis of Exclusion, led to a need for effective treatments for people with personality disorders. Problem‐solving therapy (PST) is an appropriate treatment because, rather than trying to change basic personality structure, the aim is to help people with personality disorder to learn new skills to manage their emotional dysregulation and to work within their abilities to cope more effectively with life's problems. This overview describes the underpinning model of social problem‐solving and explains how PST aims to assist with problem‐solving difficulties.

Keywords

Citation

McMurran, M., Nezu, A. and Nezu, C. (2008), "Problem Solving Therapy for People with Personality Disorders: An Overview", Mental Health Review Journal, Vol. 13 No. 2, pp. 35-39. https://doi.org/10.1108/13619322200800012

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited