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Welfare states, families, job attribute preferences, and work

Elizabeth A. Corrigall (Penn State Worthington Scranton, Dunmore, Pennsylvania, USA)

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal

ISSN: 1352-7606

Article publication date: 2 May 2008

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between welfare state configurations, family status, family responsibilities, job attribute preferences, employment, and weekly paid work hours.

Design/methodology/approach

International data for women and men were analyzed separately using regressions to determine if different welfare state configurations and individual family status and responsibilities predicted job attribute preferences. Additional regressions examined the effects of welfare state configurations, family status, family responsibilities, and job attribute preferences on women's and men's employment and weekly paid work hours.

Findings

In many cases, the variables were significant predictors of women's and men's job attribute preferences, employment and paid work hours.

Practical implications

While the attributes that people seek from their employment vary from individual to individual, it is also important to recognize that there are cultural patterns that can inform motivational efforts.

Originality/value

This multinational study is the first to examine the relationship between family status, conducting housework, providing family income, and job attribute preferences while considering labor market opportunities for women and societal support for the family. In addition, it examines the effects of these variables on employment and weekly paid work hours.

Keywords

Citation

Corrigall, E.A. (2008), "Welfare states, families, job attribute preferences, and work", Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 144-161. https://doi.org/10.1108/13527600810870598

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited