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Work‐role expectations and work family conflict: gender differences in emotional exhaustion

Margaret Posig (Associate Professor of Management in the Charles H. Kellstadt Graduate School of Business at DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA)
Jill Kickul (Associate Professor and holds the Elizabeth J. McCandless Chair in Entrepreneurship at the Simmons School of Management, Boston, Massachusetts, USA)

Women in Management Review

ISSN: 0964-9425

Article publication date: 1 October 2004

Abstract

A model integrating work‐role expectations of employees, work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict, and a component of burnout was proposed and empirically tested on 163 employees, who were also part of dual‐earner couples. Gender differences were found in the proposed model. For males, work‐family conflict mediated the relationship between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Although the same indirect relationship was found for females, a direct relationship also existed between work‐role expectations and emotional exhaustion. Additionally, for females, family‐work conflict was found to be a key contributor to work‐family conflict and emotional exhaustion. Managerial implications and future research directions are discussed.

Keywords

Citation

Posig, M. and Kickul, J. (2004), "Work‐role expectations and work family conflict: gender differences in emotional exhaustion", Women in Management Review, Vol. 19 No. 7, pp. 373-386. https://doi.org/10.1108/09649420410563430

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited