Diversity and diversion: Higher superstition and the dangers of insularity in science and technology studies

William R. Freudenburg (University of Wisconsin‐Madison)
Scott Frickel (University of Wisconsin‐Madison)
Rachel E. Dwyer (University of Wisconsin‐Madison)

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

ISSN: 0144-333X

Publication date: 1 June 1998

Abstract

Examines the debate over “Higher superstition” (Gross and Levitt, 1994). Puts forward the arguments in the book and the response to the book from members of the US science and technology studies community. Asserts that increases in technical control have been at the expense of social and individual control. Mentions “diversionary reframing” – changing the subject, possibly by diverting attention away from the subject matter to the person doing the criticizing. Explores public attitudes towards science and technology, quoting a number of layman approaches to the bafflement of science. Identifies the irony in Gross and Levitt’s arguments, particularly in developing the interface between science and technology. Recommends paying more attention to the social construction of beliefs.

Keywords

Citation

Freudenburg, W.R., Frickel, S. and Dwyer, R.E. (1998), "Diversity and diversion: Higher superstition and the dangers of insularity in science and technology studies", International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 18 No. 5/6, pp. 6-34. https://doi.org/10.1108/01443339810788416

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Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1998, MCB UP Limited

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