8. INTERNATIONAL ATTITUDES TOWARD CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: IDENTIFYING RISK FACTORS FOR MALTREATMENT

and

Administering Special Education: In Pursuit of Dignity and Autonomy

ISBN: 978-0-76231-145-3, eISBN: 978-1-84950-298-6

ISSN: 1479-3660

Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

International rates of child maltreatment, particularly for children with disabilities are difficult to determine due to a lack of centralized data bases, a tendency to not keep consistent records of disability characteristics in cases of suspected maltreatment, and in extreme cases, because maltreatment is not acknowledged or addressed publicly (Bonner et al., 1997; Morris, 1999). Therefore, most of the data on prevalence rates of maltreatment in disabled children are from western cultures such as the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. There is some evidence to suggest that the rates internationally are probably at least equal to those in the U.S. samples (Cooke & Standen, 2002; Gringorenko, 1998). Finklehor (1994) found that the rates of sexual abuse were consistent across nations for both males and females. The nations in that study included most European countries, Canada, Dominican Republic, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. On the other hand, Forrester and Harwin (2000) note that measuring child maltreatment internationally is nearly impossible due to the varying cultural norms, national resources, and the tendency for many forms of maltreatment to go unnoticed. They suggest that an alternative to measuring maltreatment internationally may be to evaluate each nation’s willingness to both address issues regarding the rights of children and to provide services to children who are maltreated.

Citation

Rotzien, A. (2004), "8. INTERNATIONAL ATTITUDES TOWARD CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES: IDENTIFYING RISK FACTORS FOR MALTREATMENT", Alexander, K. and Hunter, R. (Ed.) Administering Special Education: In Pursuit of Dignity and Autonomy (Advances in Educational Administration, Vol. 7), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 167-188. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3660(04)07008-8

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Please note you might not have access to this content

You may be able to access this content by login via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
If you would like to contact us about accessing this content, click the button and fill out the form.