WHY DO FORAGERS SHARE AND SHARERS FORAGE? EXPLORATIONS OF SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF FORAGING

Socioeconomic Aspects of Human Behavioral Ecology

ISBN: 978-0-76231-082-1, eISBN: 978-1-84950-255-9

ISSN: 0190-1281

Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

Commonly studied hunter-gatherer traits, such as grouping and sharing, may require special attention when self-selection introduces bias into typical analyses. We therefore re-examine forager sociality by asking a series of nested questions: (1) To what extent are foraging groups random samples from the larger population? (2) What social and economic factors might explain the composition of foraging groups? (3) If certain groups of individuals preferentially forage together, do these same groups also preferentially share with each other when resident at their permanent settlement? (4) To what extent can we understand behavior in the foraging context without consideration of other contexts in which individuals live and work, and vice versa? Among the Ache of Paraguay, we show that foraging treks are not representative of the larger population, individuals vary in the kinds of treks in which they participate, and those who tend to share together at the reservation are more likely to forage together on trek.

Citation

Gurven, M., Hill, K. and Jakugi, F. (2004), "WHY DO FORAGERS SHARE AND SHARERS FORAGE? EXPLORATIONS OF SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF FORAGING", Alvard, M. (Ed.) Socioeconomic Aspects of Human Behavioral Ecology (Research in Economic Anthropology, Vol. 23), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 19-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0190-1281(04)23001-3

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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