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Article

Avinash Panwar, Bimal Nepal, Rakesh Jain, Ajay P.S. Rathore and Andrew Lyons

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of lean practices on performance improvement of process industries in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of lean practices on performance improvement of process industries in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey of Indian process industries, this paper proposes two sets of hypothesis to examine if there is any statistically significant impact of lean practices on certain specific performance metrics. First, the sample is classified into two classes of process industries: the adopters of lean and those who have not yet adopted the lean practices in their manufacturing operations. Then statistical tests are conducted to measure the differences in the level of performance between the two classes of Indian process industries with respect to nine performance measures. The survey results are augmented by two in-depth case studies. Case studies include one from lean adopter firms (a refinery) and another from the firms that have not yet adopted the lean practices (a primary metal manufacturing unit).

Findings

A survey result of 121 Indian process industries shows that adoption of lean practices results in a positive impact on inventory control, waste elimination, cost reduction, productivity, and quality improvement in process industries. On the other hand, based on the sample data on Indian process industries, no statistically significant improvement could be found on the lot size or space utilization between lean adopters and their counterparts.

Practical implications

This research provides guidance to the managers on how adoption of lean practices results in better performance in process industries in several operational areas.

Originality/value

To the knowledge, this study is the first attempt to analyze the impact of lean practices on a set of specific performance metrics in Indian process industry. Although this study focuses on the Indian process industry, the authors believe that findings of the research can inform other practitioners and researchers who are considering implementing lean in process industry sector in other developing countries like India.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article

Bimal Nepal, Malini Natarajarathinam and Krishna Balla

The purpose of this paper is to design and implement a new manufacturing process for biomedical products by removing an electro‐polishing (EP) operation. The research was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design and implement a new manufacturing process for biomedical products by removing an electro‐polishing (EP) operation. The research was performed in a major North American orthopedic industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Value stream mapping is used to analyze and identify the waste in the current manufacturing process of bone screw. Upon formulation of new (to‐be) process, it has been validated to meet the regulatory requirements for the products through autoclave, endotoxin level, and biomechanical tests. Statistical tests are performed to compare the EP versus non‐EP process.

Findings

The study has shown that the EP operation was not only redundant to bone screw manufacturing but also created other problems such as quality and production delays. The overall production lead time of the screws has been reduced from 17 to 4.5 days.

Research limitations/implications

Scope of the pilot study was limited to stainless steel screw. In future, the company plans to perform similar studies on other material types.

Practical implications

The EP operation is very common in the orthopedic industry. However, as found in this paper, it is not required for every component. The bone screw case study presented in the paper offers a huge saving for the company by eliminating a “wasteful” activity from the manufacturing process.

Originality/value

Biomedical products pose unique challenges to the process optimization efforts because of their stringent government and industry requirements. This paper provides an original case study of design, validation, and testing of an improved manufacturing process for a biomedical product.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article

Avinash Panwar, Bimal Nepal, Rakesh Jain and Om Prakash Yadav

– This paper aims to present existence comprehensive analysis of state of implementation of benchmarking concepts in Indian automotive companies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present existence comprehensive analysis of state of implementation of benchmarking concepts in Indian automotive companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is carried out through a mixed method of research approach comprising of a survey of 300 auto companies in India. Out of 300, 48 valid responses together with three additional case studies were used in the data analysis. Inclusion of case studies was aspired to get deeper insight into the issues pertaining to adoption of best practices, and subsequently the implementation of benchmarking activities.

Findings

Benchmarking has been unanimously accepted as an effective performance and productivity improvement tool by Indian auto companies. However, Indian automobile manufacturers still see benchmarking as a tool to compare product attributes, quality attributes, operations, and processes. Moreover, it has been perceived as being less applicable at strategic level. Results also show that benchmarking is in its primary stage in the Indian automotive industry, and it still needs much more commitment from top management for its proliferation. Lesser significance is given to competitor benchmarking due to the fear of losing competitive advantage, and the problem of confidentiality. Reasons identified in this study for not using benchmarking include “lack of human resources” as most important, followed by “financial constraints”, and “lack of internal expertise”.

Research limitations/implications

Research results should be generalized and reproduced with a larger sample size. Owing to the scarce application of benchmarking in small and medium enterprises (SMEs), separate study should be carried out to find ways to encourage benchmarking implementation in Indian auto component manufacturing SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into the extent of implementation of benchmarking concepts in Indian automobile industry. This study is the first attempt to understand propagation of benchmarking concepts, exclusively among Indian auto companies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article

Bimal Raj Regmi and Cassandra Star

– The purpose of this paper is to shed light onto the policy context of mainstreaming community-based adaptation (CBA) in Nepal. Scaling up CBA needs strong policy support.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light onto the policy context of mainstreaming community-based adaptation (CBA) in Nepal. Scaling up CBA needs strong policy support.

Design/methodology/approach

The content and processes of Nepal’s development policies and climate change policies and programmes were examined. The policy analysis was supported by a literature review, review of policy documents and interviews and discussions undertaken with policy-makers, practitioners and communities.

Findings

Findings show that despite a lack of clear focus on climate change, the decentralization provisions and bottom-up practices within Nepal’s development policies and plans could be the entry points for mainstreaming CBA. However, experience shows that decentralization alone is insufficient because it benefits only a few institutions and individuals, while marginalizing the real beneficiaries. One of the policy conditions to mainstreaming CBA in development is to ensure that there are specific provisions for decentralization and inclusive devolution that can provide power and authority to local institutions and communities to make independent decisions and benefit the needy. There should also be mandatory legal provisions, endorsed by a country’s government, for an inclusive, citizen-centric, participatory and bottom-up policy-making process that involves the most vulnerable households and communities.

Originality/value

This paper is of relevance to policy-makers and practitioners in Nepal seeking to make informed policy decisions on effectively mainstreaming CBA into development. The analysis provided of the synergy and trade-offs within existing policy provisions and processes can be used to guide the government and stakeholders in Nepal and other least developed countries (LDCs) in creating favorable national- and local-level policies and action plans.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Expert briefing

The movement to create a separate Gorkhaland out of West Bengal state.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB246671

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Book part

Jandhyala B. G. Tilak

India is described as an emerging donor. Actually India has started providing development assistance to developing countries immediately after independence. The amount of…

Abstract

India is described as an emerging donor. Actually India has started providing development assistance to developing countries immediately after independence. The amount of aid was relatively small, but grew over the years to a recognisable size. The chapter reviews the long experience of India in the framework of development assistance which is laid in the foundational principles of South-South Development Cooperation (SSDC). In the process of the review, the special features of the India’s programme, its unique character and overall prospects are highlighted. In the absence of reliable data on total and sector-wise assistance, the chapter concentrates on one major component of assistance, viz., technical cooperation a substantial part of which is devoted to training, that is, to the development of human capital. The analysis shows that given certain unique features of its aid programme, India has a great potential to emerge as a major donor country, and even to rank among big traditional donor countries. It can also influence the global aid architecture. There are many lessons that others can learn from the ‘Indian model of aid’. However, there are certain problems and challenges that India has to address for it to become a major international player in the aid business. One of the most important problems refers to the absence of detailed information. The available details on India’s assistance are sketchy and confusing; there are no detailed and consolidated statements of assistance, and it is only now a proper formal agency to coordinate all external assistance and to provide effective management in a cohesive manner has been set up. The analytical and critical account of India’s aid programme presented here is hoped to provide valuable fresh insights into the whole issue and should be of considerable academic and policy value.

Details

Post-Education-Forall and Sustainable Development Paradigm: Structural Changes with Diversifying Actors and Norms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-271-5

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Article

Mark A. Lutz

Introduction Relativism of all shades and kinds is in fashion. For some decades, it has been trying to enter the very bastion of the academic heartland by questioning the…

Abstract

Introduction Relativism of all shades and kinds is in fashion. For some decades, it has been trying to enter the very bastion of the academic heartland by questioning the prevailing cognitive realism in the philosophy of science (Kuhn, Feyerabend). More recently a somewhat different and stronger version of relativism has made some extraordinary advances in literary criticism (the movement of “deconstruction”) and spawned some controversy in the field of law (critical legal studies). The same tendencies have now emerged in architecture (Jencks). More alarmingly, perhaps, in the social sciences we observe a brand new interest in so‐ called “post‐modern” perspectives: post‐modern ethnography in anthropology (Tylor), new voices in sociology (Lash and Urri), and, of course, also the novel ideas representing economics as discourse with a distinctly post‐modern flavor (Amariglio; Rossetti; Milberg; Ruccio).

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Book part

Priyasha Kaul

The chapter explores how gender has been an integral part of the nation building project in post-liberalisation Hindi cinema, popularly, known as Bollywood.

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter explores how gender has been an integral part of the nation building project in post-liberalisation Hindi cinema, popularly, known as Bollywood.

Design/methodology/approach

This chapter is based on primary data gathered through interviews with prominent members of the Hindi film industry along with a detailed content analysis of commercially successful post-liberalisation mainstream Hindi films.

Findings

It highlights how the representation of gender has been a central axis around which the tension between tradition and modernity has been played out in Hindi Cinema. The construction of Indianness post-liberalisation has questioned gender politics but proposed easy resolutions which fit into the larger nationalist narrative. In doing so, it has used the diaspora as a category to produce a nationalist account which is simultaneously essentialised and transnational in the quest for projecting India’s aspirations on the global platform.

Originality/value

The chapter provides important insights into the role of popular Hindi cinema, often brushed off as frivolous, in contributing to the mainstream discourse on nationalism post-liberalisation.

Details

Gender and Race Matter: Global Perspectives on Being a Woman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-037-4

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