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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Malcolm Philip and Peter Lindley

The authors make the case for concluding that current workforce models stop short at workforce planning. These are not truly integrated approaches that take an inclusive…

Abstract

The authors make the case for concluding that current workforce models stop short at workforce planning. These are not truly integrated approaches that take an inclusive approach to the involvement of stakeholders. Nor do current models put the service users first in terms of designing a holistic workforce development process driven by and for the service user. The authors go on to articulate the key features of such a service user‐focused approach.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Meera Alagaraja, Pradeep Kotamraju and Sehoon Kim

This paper aims to review technical vocational education and training (TVET) literature, identify different components of the TVET system and develop a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review technical vocational education and training (TVET) literature, identify different components of the TVET system and develop a conceptual framework that integrates human resource development (HRD) and national human resource development (NHRD) outcomes. The renewed focus on technical vocational education and training (TVET) is important for human resource development (HRD), as it expands current understanding of its role in economic development through workforce training. National human resource development (NHRD) perspectives recognize the role of TVET in linking regional and national economic development strategies. Furthermore, TVET’s focus on literacy education, poverty alleviation and inclusion of marginalized and vulnerable populations emphasizes social development outcomes that are critical for NHRD. Using this background, the integration of HRD and NHRD outcomes into one conceptual TVET framework for addressing workforce, economic and social development outcomes has been proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

A targeted literature review approach was used for exploring relevant research on TVET systems, identifying the components which support and/or inhibit its effectiveness and an integrative framework that connects education, workforce development, social development and economic development was developed.

Findings

Three major themes were identified. The first theme identifies nine sub-themes that make an effective TVET system. These are as follows: national TVET policy, regional TVET policy, training, participation, curriculum, coordination of stakeholder institutions, individual and institutional attitudes toward skill development, managing supply-demand mismatches and economic and social development outcomes. The second major theme underlines the increasing overlap and connection between workforce development, social development and economic development strategies. In the third and final finding, effective TVET systems are positioned as the linking pin connecting the four TVET components (skills, education, innovation and knowledge) to the strategic goals of workforce development, economic development and social development.

Originality/value

Integrating national and organizational-based HRD strategies is a unique focus and reflects the broader examination of the differences in the relationship between corporate HRD and more traditional TVET systems. It is argued that the role of TVET in social and workforce development at the regional and societal level cannot be ignored. HRD and NHRD outcomes were integrated by utilizing TVET as a framework for linking economic, social and workforce development strategies.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Yesim Deniz Ozkan-Ozen and Yigit Kazancoglu

The aim of this paper is to identify and analyse workforce development challenges in the digital age by first, presenting these challenges and relationship between them…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify and analyse workforce development challenges in the digital age by first, presenting these challenges and relationship between them, and then proposing a structural model that categorizes these challenges and proposes suggestions for managers to improve human resources practices and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Fuzzy total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) is used as the methodology, which gives an interpretive structural model by presenting direct and transitive relationship between workforce development challenges and categorizes them under autonomous, dependent, independent and linkage groups.

Findings

In total, 13 different workforce development challenges are presented in this study. Results showed that lack of IT/digital skills has a critical role in workforce development in terms of affecting other challenges. Dependent group includes requirements for longer learning time and specialized training, lack of analytical thinking and dealing with complexity, and lack of interdisciplinary thinking and acting. On the other hand, lack of ability in decentralized decision-making and shortage of workforce with adequate skillset within the labour market have more macro-impacts on others. Most of the challenges located in the linkage group, which means that most of the challenges are interrelated with each other.

Originality/value

Originality of this paper is presenting a systematic structure for workforce development in Industry 4.0 that considers challenges systematically.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Annemarie Wille and Barry Nixon

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this…

Abstract

New Zealand is not alone in facing challenges for the building and sustaining of a future health workforce that can meet the needs of a diverse population. In this article, the author describes how New Zealand has begun to build on models developed from the UK and elsewhere to attend to workforce issues in the child and adolescent mental health and addictions sector. The workforce planning development model being implemented by the Werry Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health has a solid pedigree, with a very New Zealand focused process for implementation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2021

Joy Akehurst, Paul Stronge, Karen Giles and Jonathon Ling

The aim of this action research was to explore, from a workforce and a patient/carer perspective, the skills and the capacity required to deliver integrated care and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this action research was to explore, from a workforce and a patient/carer perspective, the skills and the capacity required to deliver integrated care and to inform future workforce development and planning in a new integrated care system in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews and focus groups with primary, community, acute care, social care and voluntary care, frontline and managerial staff and with patients and carers receiving these services were undertaken. Data were explored using framework analysis.

Findings

Analysis revealed three overarching themes: achieving teamwork and integration, managing demands on capacity and capability and delivering holistic and user-centred care. An organisational development (OD) process was developed as part of the action research process to facilitate the large-scale workforce changes taking place.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not consider workforce development and planning challenges for nursing and care staff in residential, nursing care homes or domiciliary services. This part of the workforce is integral to the care pathways for many patients, and in line with the current emerging national focus on this sector, these groups require further examination. Further, data explore service users' and carers' perspectives on workforce skills. It proved challenging to recruit patient and carer respondents for the research due to the nature of their illnesses.

Practical implications

Many of the required skills already existed within the workforce. The OD process facilitated collaborative learning to enhance skills; however, workforce planning across a whole system has challenges in relation to data gathering and management. Ensuring a focus on workforce development and planning is an important part of integrated care development.

Social implications

This study has implications for social and voluntary sector organisations in respect of inter-agency working practices, as well as the identification of workforce development needs and potential for informing subsequent cross-sector workforce planning arrangements and communication.

Originality/value

This paper helps to identify the issues and benefits of implementing person-centred, integrated teamworking and the implications for workforce planning and OD approaches.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Roslyn Hope and John Allcock

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Andrea Wigfield, Katy Wright, Elizabeth Burtney and Diane Buddery

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the implications of the increasing use of Assisted Living Technology in the social care sector and to assess the implications for the workforce in terms of job roles, skills, knowledge, training, and support.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used, through a quantitative electronic survey of staff working in social care (as well as some health care) organisations in England, and three qualitative case studies of local authorities.

Findings

The research shows that the organisations involved in delivering Assisted Living Technology, the types of Assisted Living Technology being introduced, and the way in which it is being delivered, have implications for job roles and the skills and knowledge needed by staff. The associated training and workforce development similarly varies across the social care sector; it is ad hoc, disparate, and provided primarily by individual employers or by suppliers and manufacturers.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for a standardised Assisted Living Technology workforce development approach which can be used across the social care sector.

Practical implications

The varied nature of Assisted Living Technology providers and delivery models presents a challenge to the development and implementation of a standardised programme of workforce development.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of new empirical research arising from a quantitative and qualitative study of the workforce development implications of Assisted Living Technology in the English social care sector.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Robert W. Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores the current skills gap debate as a component of the American economy. This is an important issue as there is an increased economic uncertainty and global competition impacting many sectors. The paper specifically defines the current skills gap dilemma with respect to the USA and uses the Tampa, FL example of the practical implications of these concerns using recent survey and focus group data.

Design/methodology/approach

The research for this paper includes an outline of the economic development structures in place in Tampa, FL, a description of the existing mandate(s) to improve workforce training; the review of a key recent, public record report on workforce skills; and, the results of a focus group developed using key stakeholders. Initially, a public record document report titled Clarus Corporation (2013) “Hillsborough Community College: Workforce Development Scan” was reviewed to provide context and preliminary data to guide the research. In the second phase, a survey was conducted to develop a focus group of 18 key stakeholders in Hillsborough County. Nine of these stakeholders represented the education sector. These were purposefully selected from the Tampa Bay Higher Education Alliance (TBHEA) which represents approximately 30 regionally accredited academic institutions in the Tampa community (TBHEA, n.d.). In addition, another nine respondents were selected by purposeful selection representing employers who had experience with workforce training and development initiatives.

Findings

The group survey conducted for this paper confirms concerns by both employers and educators with respect to the existing and the future skill sets of employees. In particular, respondents note that basic skills such as communication and technical skills need more attention. Also, the focus group respondents confirm the importance of technical service certification. Fundamentally, economic development professionals, educators and employers need to develop and implement strategies and action plans to ensure that the skills gap be identified correctly and properly addressed. These initiatives must be developed with broad stakeholder input and these initiatives must be viewed as dynamic reflecting changing circumstances.

Research limitations/implications

This research should be viewed as exploratory in nature. The research could serve as a template to develop and track the concerns and issues of key stakeholders in the economic development process with respect to skills in the workforce on a regional or indeed a statewide basis.

Practical implications

Nations, states and local governments are more active in structuring workforce development support mechanisms and specific training opportunities to assist employees and businesses. All levels of government highlight the fact that they have skilled, competitive employees to assist in recruiting new companies to consider locating in their respective jurisdictions and in retaining companies.

Social implications

Having a clear understanding of the skills being demanded by employers as they strive to remain globally competitive is important. Local economic development officials, academicians and employers must be on the same page. Although relationships between these sectors are critical flexibility and adaptability are key to reflect changing demands.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence of the perceptions employers and educators have with respect to the skills gap issue in a fast growth jurisdiction. This jurisdiction promotes itself as having an abundant and skilled labor force. Data suggest that there are some concerns emerging from stakeholders.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

A majority of human resource executives report that their inability to attract and retain middle-skills talent frequently affects their firm’s performance. Middle-skills…

Abstract

A majority of human resource executives report that their inability to attract and retain middle-skills talent frequently affects their firm’s performance. Middle-skills jobs, those that require more than a high school diploma, less than a four-year college degree, and pay above the national living wage, account for nearly half of labor demanded in the United States. As technology transforms the workplace, digital skills are becoming increasingly important and in higher demand. In today’s dynamic workforce, managers are facing managing and developing interdisciplinary and multilevel teams while combating a technical skills divide (lack of qualified workers), making it difficult to recruit and retain a high-technology, middle-skill-level workforce. This chapter focuses on addressing unique challenges relevant to recruitment, upskilling, and management best practices as they relate to the integration of technology and middle-skill-level workers in a highly successful workplace.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Preecha Suvarnathong, Teeradej Chai-Aroon, Uthaithip Jiawiwatkul and Pasakorn Intoo-Marn

The purpose of this study was to investigate the provincial-level systems and mechanisms to develop health volunteers to improve the health of the immigrant workforce in Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the provincial-level systems and mechanisms to develop health volunteers to improve the health of the immigrant workforce in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study obtained data from document research, in-depth interviews with 58 people involved at policy and provincial levels working to develop health volunteers to improve the health of the immigrant workforce. Data were collected from May–October 2017; then the content of the conceptual framework was analyzed, the research objectives were examined and summary and induction analysis interpreted data from documents, observations and interviews.

Findings

Thailand has four systems for developing health volunteers to improve the health of the immigrant workforce: recruitment, training and knowledge management, welfare and motivational and financial and other supportive resources. Development is driven through the mechanisms of the Provincial Public Health Office with Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and network partners. The health volunteer development exhibits two patterns: developing migrant workers to become migrant health volunteers and developing village health volunteers to perform health care for the immigrant workforce. All development patterns mainly rely upon the regular operating budget, which is often inadequate. Frequently, some provinces make attempts to seek other funding sources. In fact, health volunteer development is subjected to local authorities of the four provinces whose systems and mechanisms of development differ from one another.

Originality/value

The findings from this study could help develop health volunteers to significantly improve the health of the immigrant workforce in the Thai health service system.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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