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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Yunsoo Lee, Jae Young Lee and Jin Lee

The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between two sub-constructs of heavy work investment: work engagement and workaholism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between two sub-constructs of heavy work investment: work engagement and workaholism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to synthesize and critically assess existing research on the relationship between these concepts.

Findings

The review revealed three major shortcomings of the extant literature: a dichotomous perspective, variations in measurements and the unaddressed complexity of the relationship.

Originality/value

Based on these findings, this study provides a discussion on the limitations and suggestions for future research on work engagement and workaholism, including using a person-centered approach.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2007

Ronald J. Burke and Teal McAteer

This chapter addresses a number of issues related to work hours and work addiction. The dependent variables associated with working long hours include health-related…

Abstract

This chapter addresses a number of issues related to work hours and work addiction. The dependent variables associated with working long hours include health-related illnesses, injuries, sleep patterns, fatigue, heart rate and hormone level changes, as well as several work/non-work life balance issues. Motives for working long hours such as joy in the work, avoiding job insecurity or negative sanctions from a superior, employer demands, are addressed in detail, and a multitude of moderators shown to have affected the work hours and well-being relationship, are reviewed. These include reasons for working long hours, work schedule autonomy, monetary gain, choice in working for long hours. The chapter suggests a need for more research to better understand workaholism and work addiction, as well as provides a number of implications and organizational and societal suggestions for addressing work-hour concerns.

Details

Exploring the Work and Non-Work Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1444-7

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Malissa A. Clark, Gregory W. Stevens, Jesse S. Michel and Lauren Zimmerman

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a…

Abstract

This chapter examines the role of leader workaholism in relation to their own and their followers’ well-being. We begin with an overview of workaholism, along with a description of how workaholism may relate to typical leader behaviors. We propose a conceptual model linking the various components of workaholism to leaders’ well-being and followers’ well-being. In our model, we propose that leaders’ workaholism can negatively influence their own well-being, and also their followers’ well-being through interindividual crossover of affective, cognitive, and behavioral components of workaholism. Furthermore, the negative well-being outcomes experienced by the workaholic leader can also crossover to the followers through interindividual strain–strain crossover. Several moderating factors of these relationships are discussed, as well as avenues for future research.

Details

The Role of Leadership in Occupational Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-061-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Fatemeh Taheri, Mohammad Asarian and Pooyan Shahhosseini

This paper investigated the relationships among workaholism, work–family enrichment (work–life enrichment), and workplace incivility.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigated the relationships among workaholism, work–family enrichment (work–life enrichment), and workplace incivility.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on workaholism, incivility, and work–family enrichment were collected through the administration of a survey on 414 employees of a public bank in Iran.

Findings

Workaholism and life–work enrichment were positively and negatively related to uncivil behaviors, respectively, and workaholism was positively associated with work–family enrichment. Overall, work–family enrichment did not act as a mediator variable between workaholism and uncivil behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should consider public or private organizations and assess the different instigators of incivility considering the mediator or moderating role of gender.

Practical implications

Managers should focus on reducing workaholism and developing life–work enrichment in order to decrease uncivil behaviors.

Social implications

Given the hard economic and complex political conditions in Iran and increasing likelihood of uncivil behaviors, the results of the present study offer ways to minimize workplace incivility in employees.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the research on uncivil behavior by improving the understanding of organizational and personal factors (workaholism and work–life enrichment) that can influence workplace incivility among employees working in public organizations. It also addresses the usefulness of examining work–life enrichment disposition in understanding the relationship between workaholism and workplace incivility.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Ying An, Xiaomin Sun, Kai Wang, Huijie Shi, Zhenzhen Liu, Yiming Zhu and Fang Luo

Why do some employees choose to prolong their working hours excessively? The current study tested how core self-evaluations (CSEs) might lead to workaholism and how…

Abstract

Purpose

Why do some employees choose to prolong their working hours excessively? The current study tested how core self-evaluations (CSEs) might lead to workaholism and how perceived job demands might mediate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Insights from the extant literature underpin the hypotheses on how CSEs would affect the development of workaholism through perceived job demands. A sample of 421 working people in China completed the online surveys, and the mediation model was tested using Mplus 7.0 (Muthén and Muthén, 1998–2012).

Findings

This study found that different components of CSEs influence workaholism in different ways. Specifically, generalized self-efficacy positively predicts workaholism, whereas emotional stability negatively predicts workaholism. Moreover, most aspects of CSEs (generalized self-efficacy, emotional stability and locus of control) influence workaholism via perceived job demands, specifically via perceived workload but not via perceived job insecurity.

Originality/value

The current study is the first to explore how individuals' fundamental evaluations of themselves (i.e. CSEs) relate to workaholism. The results are helpful for the prevention and intervention of workaholism in organizations.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Shahnaz Aziz, Karl Wuensch and Saame Raza Shaikh

The purpose of this paper is to examine if facets of workaholism are associated with a family history of metabolic diseases.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if facets of workaholism are associated with a family history of metabolic diseases.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on workaholism and family history of health issues were collected, through administration of an online survey, from 194 employees.

Findings

Workaholism significantly related to a family history of metabolic diseases.

Research limitations/implications

Future researchers should collect objective disease data, examine work-related moderators as well as potential mediators, and implement longitudinal designs with much larger samples. That said, the data reveal a correlation between workaholism and family history of metabolic disease.

Practical implications

The results provide valuable information to help promote a healthy workforce and to improve employees’ health by reducing workaholic tendencies. They could also help to minimize health-related costs associated with metabolic diseases that could develop in parallel with workaholism, as well as costs in terms of a loss in productivity due absenteeism.

Originality/value

It is, the authors believe, the first study to investigate the relationship between facets of workaholism and family history of health issues that have often been associated with metabolic diseases.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Ilona van Beek, Toon W. Taris, Wilmar B. Schaufeli and Veerle Brenninkmeijer

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory…

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Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to investigate the motivational correlates of two types of heavy work investment: workaholism and work engagement. Building on Higgins's regulatory focus theory, the paper examines which work goals workaholic and engaged employees pursue and which strategies they use to achieve these goals. Furthermore, the paper examines how workaholism and work engagement relate to three different work outcomes: job satisfaction, turnover intention, and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from a cross-sectional survey study among 680 Dutch employees in the banking industry were analysed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The analyses revealed that workaholism was primarily and positively associated with having a prevention focus, whereas work engagement was primarily and positively associated with having a promotion focus. Furthermore, workaholism was negatively related to job satisfaction and job performance, and positively related to turnover intention, whereas work engagement was positively associated with job satisfaction and job performance, and negatively associated with turnover intention. Both forms of heavy work investment almost fully mediated the associations between the regulatory foci and the three work outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions rely on self-report data, a relatively homogeneous sample, and a cross-sectional design. This may have biased our findings to some degree and does not allow inferring causal conclusions.

Practical implications

The findings show that workaholic and engaged employees have different work goals and use different strategies to pursue these goals. Moreover, both forms of heavy work investment are oppositely related to work outcomes. Organizations may develop policies to reduce workaholism and to promote work engagement by influencing their employees' regulatory foci.

Originality/value

The present study demonstrates that two types of heavy work investment can be distinguished, each with a unique motivational make-up and a unique pattern of work outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Arnold B. Bakker, Akihito Shimazu, E. Demerouti, Kyoko Shimada and Norito Kawakami

The purpose of this study is to examine how two different types of heavy work investment – work engagement and workaholism – are related to family satisfaction as reported…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how two different types of heavy work investment – work engagement and workaholism – are related to family satisfaction as reported by employees and their intimate partner.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 398 Japanese couples completed self-reported questionnaires including the model variables. One year later, participants reported again on their family satisfaction. Structural equation modelling analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

As hypothesized, work engagement was positively related to work-family facilitation, which, in turn, predicted own and partner's family satisfaction, also one year later. In contrast, workaholism showed a positive relationship with work-family conflict, and had an indirect negative effect on own and partner's family satisfaction. The structural relationships between the variables from husbands to wives were similar to those from wives to husbands.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a non-experimental design does not allow for definitive conclusions regarding causality.

Practical implications

The findings contribute to the work-family interface literature by showing how experiences built up at work can have a positive or negative impact on one's partner's family satisfaction. The study highlights a growing need to promote work engagement and discourage workaholism within organizations since engagement has positive and workaholism has negative implications for employees' private life.

Originality/value

This study clearly shows the differences between two important work experiences – work engagement and workaholism. Using the spillover-crossover model, the study sheds a new light on the process through which employee work engagement and workaholism influence one's partner at home.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Zena Burgess, Ronald J. Burke and Fay Oberklaid

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by…

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1109

Abstract

Purpose − This study aims to examine gender differences in three workaholism and workaholism‐related variables. Design/methodology/approach − Uses measures developed by Spence and Robbins and examines gender differences in three workaholism components, workaholic job behaviors and work and well‐being outcomes among Australian psychologists. Findings − Females and males were found to differ on many personal and situational demographic characters, two of three workaholism components (work involvement, and feeling driven to work) males scoring higher. Females, however, reported higher levels of particular workaholic job behaviors (e.g. perfectionism, job stress) likely to be associated with lower levels of satisfaction and well‐being. Females and males scored similarly on work outcomes, family satisfaction, physical health and emotional health. Females indicated more psychosomatic symptoms and less community satisfaction but more friends satisfaction. Originality/value − Aids in the understanding of workaholism in organizations.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Ronald J. Burke

The topic of workaholism in organizations has received considerable attention in the popular media although our understanding of it is still quite limited. Most…

Abstract

The topic of workaholism in organizations has received considerable attention in the popular media although our understanding of it is still quite limited. Most definitions of workaholism convey the notion of singular commitment to work to the detriment of extra‐work activities. This study, using measures developed by Spence and Robbins (1992), examines the relationship of workaholism type to measures of extra‐work satisfactions (family, friends, community). Data were collected from 530 women and men managers and professionals using anonymous questionnaires. The results showed the hypothesized negative relationship between workaholism and extra‐work satisfactions. Implications for reducing workaholic behaviors are offered.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

1 – 10 of 547