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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Francesco Contò, Demetris Vrontis, Mariantonietta Fiore and Alkis Thrassou

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potentialities of cross border projects to develop and promote wine culture, and consequently tourism and hospitality; paying…

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1450

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potentialities of cross border projects to develop and promote wine culture, and consequently tourism and hospitality; paying particular attention to the process and actions supporting the development and refinement of cultural attributes, traditional values and regional identity.

Design/methodology/approach

Methodologically, it is a deductive reasoning exploratory research, based on the findings of an extensive undergoing project across ten countries, spanning from Italy to Eastern Europe, and theoretically founded on an extensive literature review.

Findings

The findings identify the spectrum and nature of opportunities and constraints of cross border collaborations in developing the wine industry and reaping of its wider economic and cultural benefits. Further to the scholarly value of the findings, the paper identifies and presents the descriptive managerial/industrial implications, along with prescriptively explicit directions toward practical implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The research is exploratory and therefore, by nature, in need of further empirical validation.

Practical implications

The research constructs a viable framework for an integrative approach involving the improved definition of regional cultural image and identity, proper strategic industry-region and cross-border collaborations, and socio-economic development.

Social implications

To promote cross border countries and cultural territorial values and identity.

Originality/value

The research's value lies in its multi-perspective outlook which keeps the wine business at its focus, but investigates its development outside the strict confines of its own industry to present potentialities through strategic collaborations with the tourist industry and other regions/countries in integrative synergistic approach and with strong cultural elements.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Kyuho Lee, Melih Madanoglu, Steve W. Henson and Jae-Youn Ko

Confucian philosophy emphasizes gender roles that place significant restrictions on the consumption of non-traditional products. The authors use wine to advance our…

Abstract

Purpose

Confucian philosophy emphasizes gender roles that place significant restrictions on the consumption of non-traditional products. The authors use wine to advance our understanding of how South Korean female consumers have established a new female gender role and identity by adopting new communities that allow non-traditional consumption while still accepting gender roles. This paper aims to examine how South Korean female consumers create a unique consumption culture with respect to wine consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

A hermeneutic approach was adopted to understand what motivates South Korean female consumers to join a wine consumption community and their perceptions about consuming wine. Researchers conducted 26 semi-structured face-to-face interviews that ranged from 45 to 120 min, with an average duration of 1 h.

Findings

The results of the study suggest that wine can be a medium for emancipating women from traditional gender roles and social images of women embedded in South Korean society that call for women to sacrifice themselves for their families. In addition, the study’s findings suggest that Western wine marketers need to understand the power of wine consumption communities that are a unique consumption ritual among South Korean female wine consumers.

Originality/value

South Korean female respondents drink wine as both a way to seek pleasure through a Western alcoholic beverage and to consume and experience Western culture and lifestyles. However, South Korean female respondents tend to drink wine within consumption communities, which are a powerful consumption ritual in South Korea. In other words, although South Korean female respondents consume wine to experience and learn about Western culture and lifestyles, they have entirely not abandoned their traditional consumption rituals.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2016

Jennifer Smith Maguire and Dunfu Zhang

Previous research suggests that constructions of legitimacy play a central role in the development of markets, yet little attention has been given to how that legitimacy…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research suggests that constructions of legitimacy play a central role in the development of markets, yet little attention has been given to how that legitimacy is constructed through the material practices of market actors. This paper aims to address this gap via an examination of cultural intermediaries in the fine wine market of Shanghai.

Methodology/approach

An interpretive thematic analysis was carried out on data from 13 semi-structured interviews with fine wine intermediaries based primarily in Shanghai (5 wine writers/educators; 5 sommeliers/retailers; 3 brand representatives).

Findings

The dimensions of the legitimation of wine were examined, identifying three key themes: the legitimacy of intermediaries as experts; the legitimacy of a particular mode of wine consumption; the legitimacy of the intermediaries as exemplars for not-yet-legitimate consumers. These findings suggest that cultural intermediaries’ personal, consuming preferences and practices are significant to the formation of a new market, and that they must negotiate potential tensions between interactions with legitimate, not-yet-legitimate and illegitimate consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations with regard to generalizability are discussed with regard to potential future research.

Social implications

The focus on cultural intermediaries and dimensions of legitimation can be used to examine the case of other emerging markets to anticipate the pathways to institutionalizing new forms of taste and consumption practices.

Originality/value

The paper offers an empirical insight into the market dynamics of distinction in the Shanghai wine market and conceptual insight into the importance of cultural intermediaries as exemplar consumers.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-495-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Jorge Pelegrín-Borondo, Ruben Fernández Ortiz and Lino Meraz-Ruiz

This study aims to compare the influence of emotions produced by the wine and the winery visit on wine purchase intent at two destinations with different cultural views…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the influence of emotions produced by the wine and the winery visit on wine purchase intent at two destinations with different cultural views (old and new wine worlds).

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was adopted using a total sample of 600 tourists from two different wineries, one in La Rioja (Spain, Europe) and the other in Baja California (Mexico, North America). All the tourists surveyed at the European winery were European, and all the tourists surveyed at the North American winery were North American.

Findings

The results expand on previous research. At the tested wineries, the emotions produced by the wine (product) had a greater influence than those produced by the winery (environment); however, the intensity of their respective influences varied depending on whether the winery was in the new or old wine world.

Research limitations/implications

While the wine description was controlled by showing the same offer at both destinations, the winery visit experience was neither controlled nor controllable because the tours were real. Additionally, although the research variables were very similar in this study, the effect of differences in income between the tourists from the different regions was not considered.

Practical implications

Winery managers wishing to positively influence wine purchases at their establishments should focus their efforts on generating high positive emotions through the wine offer. They should also keep in mind the possible need for different approaches because of cultural differences between the tourists (North American or European) visiting the winery. To sell wine and build their brand, they should identify those tourists truly interested in wine.

Originality/value

Although the literature recognizes the influence of the emotions produced by the product and the environment on wine purchase intent, this is the first study to simultaneously compare the influence of the emotions generated by both the wine on offer (product) and the winery visit (environment) on wine purchase intent in tourists to two different wineries (new vs old wine world).

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Caroline Ritchie

The UK wine market is one of the largest in the world. The purpose of this paper is to investigate current social and cultural influences affecting the buying behaviour of…

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2621

Abstract

Purpose

The UK wine market is one of the largest in the world. The purpose of this paper is to investigate current social and cultural influences affecting the buying behaviour of UK wine consumers within off‐trade environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Three stakeholder groups involved in the provision and sale of wine in the UK are identified. Data gathered from these stakeholders, via semi‐structured interviews, are used to classify groups of UK wine consumers and to develop a question schedule for a series of six wine consumer focus groups.

Findings

The results show that intended usage and or consumption situation have significant influence upon purchasing behaviour. The purchase decision is further influenced by whether intended usage is to be private or public. Significant gender differences are identified; wine buying is often perceived as a predominantly male role although more women actually buy more wine. Differences in low involvement and novice behaviours are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The sample population used was small and may not be representative quantitatively. However the use of focus groups enabled the gathering of significant qualitative data.

Practical implications

As a mature, sophisticated wine market, wine purchasing and consumption in the UK has become so incorporated into lifestyle that the consumption context drives purchasing behaviour whether overtly or covertly. Understanding the context of presumed use enables better understanding of consumer behaviour to be developed.

Originality/value

This study suggests that whilst high and low involvement market segments can be, and have previously been, identified these are artificial and fluid constructs since most wine consumers utilise a range of behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Amie Sexton

The purpose of this paper is to trace the dispersed yet influential presence of the French in the Australian wine industry from the beginning of the industry until the…

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958

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the dispersed yet influential presence of the French in the Australian wine industry from the beginning of the industry until the present day. It looks at the physical presence of the French on Australian soil (e.g. winemakers, companies, vines) and the French cultural influence (e.g. publications, stereotypes, promotion). It aims to provide an historical context in which to place questions concerning contemporary Australian attitudes to French wine and to wine in general.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical review of French presence and influence on the Australian wine industry using historical and contemporary documents and records.

Findings

While the French presence in Australia has always been minimal, it exerts a powerful influence on the Australian wine industry. Throughout the history of the industry, French individuals and culture have maintained the image of “French expertise”, thus French wine is still the point of reference for the Australian wine industry and consumer. The high status enjoyed by French wine can be attributed in part to the historical influence of the French on Australian wine.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into attitudes to French wine in Australia is needed to understand consumer preferences.

Originality/value

The paper represents one of the first attempts to investigate the presence and influence of French wines and winemaking in the Australian wine industry. It presents an historical account of the French in the Australian wine industry and the influence of French culture on Australian wine.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Hanqin Zhang Qiu, Jingxue (Jessica) Yuan, Ben Haobin Ye and Kam Hung

The aims of this study were to investigate the influencing factors of wine tourism development in China, assess the marketing efforts made by the wine-tourism…

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3825

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study were to investigate the influencing factors of wine tourism development in China, assess the marketing efforts made by the wine-tourism stakeholders, and provide constructive suggestions for the development of China's wine tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for the purposes of this research. The study site is the Bohai Bay wine region in Shandong Province, the birthplace of China's modern wine industry and the largest wine-producing area in China. Chateau Changyu-Castel and Chateau Junding were visited in June 2010. Qualitative data were collected in the forms of observations of the wineries, interviews with wine tourists, focus groups with tourism practitioners, and analyses of travel blogs, document excerpts, and official web sites. Content analysis produced a thematic framework on people, promotion, and place.

Findings

A number of facilitating and detrimental factors were revealed pertaining to China's wine tourism development on the three themes: people, promotion, and place.

Research limitations/implications

The number of wine tourists being interviewed is relatively small, and the wineries chosen are relatively large ones. Results may not be generalized to other wine tourists and wineries in China.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the development of wine tourism in China, such as food and wine pairing that combines wine with local (Chinese) cuisine at the wineries, positioning, and genuine government support.

Originality/value

Research on wine tourism and wine tourists in China is scant. The current research fills a research gap by examining China's wine tourism phenomena from multiple perspectives, including those of tourists, tourism practitioners, and wine tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Teagan Altschwager, Jodie Conduit, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva and Steve Goodman

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term branded marketing events (BMEs), and examine the role of its experiential components as a strategic tool for the…

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1796

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term branded marketing events (BMEs), and examine the role of its experiential components as a strategic tool for the facilitation of customer brand engagement. This study examines five experiential components of BMEs at events held in Australia and France to determine their respective impact on customer brand engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were distributed to attendees of ten events by six wine brands in South Australia, and six events in five sub-regions of Bordeaux.

Findings

Findings suggest that BMEs influence customers’ brand engagement and brand purchase intention in both Australia and France. However, the experiential components within the events had differing effects. Australian customers were influenced by cognitive, sensorial, and relational experiences and their increased customer brand engagement strongly influenced brand purchase intention. French customers, however, required pragmatic event experiences to build brand engagement.

Originality/value

Recognizing their mutual experiential and interactive foundations, this study integrates the research domains of marketing events, customer experiences and customer brand engagement, and contributes to the strategic understanding of how branded event experiences facilitate customer brand engagement.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Lynnaire Sheridan, Abel Duarte Alonso and Pascal Scherrer

Many studies underline the critical relationship between local communities and rural‐based industries. However, the dynamics of the relationship between wineries and local…

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1112

Abstract

Purpose

Many studies underline the critical relationship between local communities and rural‐based industries. However, the dynamics of the relationship between wineries and local communities is rarely considered in research despite the importance of these links for rural communities. This paper investigates this dimension from the perspective of Canary Islands' small wine growers.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 23 winery operations located on the islands of Tenerife and La Palma accept the invitation to participate in the form of face‐to‐face interviews.

Findings

The level of participation and contribution to the community varies between operations, with some small family operations in particular limiting their external involvement, while others see it as a necessary and/or beneficial relationship. Most wineries in the study are active in their communities, participating in local events and employing local residents. However, generational changes that threaten both the wine business and tradition, or mass tourism leading to land value increases are critical challenges to the winery‐community relationship.

Research limitations/implications

With over 200 largely small‐family wineries in the Canary Islands, it is acknowledged that the sample of wineries in this paper may not be representative of the region's wine industry.

Practical implications

The strengthening relationships between wineries and local communities for cultural events can build nostalgia for local wine production. This, in turn, appears to be vital for preserving the local wine culture and tradition by making winery ownership and work well‐regarded by the local community.

Originality/value

To date limited research has been conducted on the redeveloping Canary Islands' wine industry, particularly from winery operators' points of view.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2009

Abel Duarte Alonso and Jeremy Northcote

Wine is an integral part of so‐called “Old World” nations, amalgamating with the local history and landscape, and providing a powerful “origin branding”. To date, however…

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2397

Abstract

Purpose

Wine is an integral part of so‐called “Old World” nations, amalgamating with the local history and landscape, and providing a powerful “origin branding”. To date, however, these dimensions have been discussed to a very limited extent in emerging “New World” wine regions, where the lack of a traditional heritage of wine making presents special challenges in terms of origin branding. The focus of most previous research has been on the viewpoints of consumers, not those of producers. This study seeks to explore these dimensions among small wine growers.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach, 42 interviews with winery operators from several emerging Western Australian wine regions were conducted.

Findings

In the absence of historical wine pioneers and traditions, winery operators in emerging wine‐producing regions use alternative means for “origin branding” that emphasise heritage and landscape characteristics centring on the wider “rural idyll”. These associations serve to forge a “vintage” identity for their industry, which essentially masks its youth for their region.

Research limitations/implications

In view of the more than 200 small wineries operating in Western Australia the number of respondents in the study may not allow for making generalisations of the state's wine industry.

Practical implications

The current growth in the number of wineries in the regions studied and the increasingly acknowledged quality of their wine product may help towards the establishment of their history and identity, thus contributing to origin branding over time.

Originality/value

The study explores the importance of history and landscape among winery operators in promoting their wineries and their wine products in the context of emerging wine regions, an area for the most part ignored in contemporary research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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