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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Heejin Lim and Michelle Childs

The new focus of brand communication in social media has driven firms to develop the effective visual content strategy. In light of narrative transportation theory, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The new focus of brand communication in social media has driven firms to develop the effective visual content strategy. In light of narrative transportation theory, this study aims to investigate the impact of a photo’s narrative elements on self-brand connection through viewers’ transportation and emotional responses. Additionally, this study tests the role of telepresence on Instagram in this psychological mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Using between-subjects experimental design, two experimental studies test the effect of implied movement (Study 1) and diverse narrative elements such as a character, implied motion for chronology and the relevant background (Study 2).

Findings

Results demonstrate that a single narrative element, i.e. implied motion, does not induce a viewer’s transportation to the presented image. Rather, the viewer’s transportation occurs as a function of complex and diverse narrative elements, such as implied motion and the background as a context.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that the concept of photo narrative should be taken into consideration in a visually-oriented social media environment. To increase self-brand connection, social media communication should be designed with diverse elements to promote viewers’ active simulation and create meaning to the branded photo story.

Originality/value

This study expands the theory of narrative transportation by applying it to a visual form. Additionally, this research investigates the effect of social media communication on self-brand connection; the findings of this study demonstrate that a major goal of social media communication is not to sell products but to strengthen consumer-brand relationships through branded storytelling.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Arch G. Woodside

Chapter 4 shows and tells how to create visual art to achieve deep understanding about stories that individuals tell. Creating visual narrative art (VNA) of stories…

Abstract

Synopsis

Chapter 4 shows and tells how to create visual art to achieve deep understanding about stories that individuals tell. Creating visual narrative art (VNA) of stories achieves several objectives. First, creating VNA revises and deepens sense-making of the meaning of events in the story and what the complete story implies about oneself and others. Second, creating VNA surfaces unconscious thinking of the protagonist and other actors in the story as well as the storyteller (recognizing that in many presentations of stories an actor in the story is also the storyteller); unconscious thinking in stories relating to consumer and brand experiences reflect one or more archetype (Jung 1916/1959) fulfillments by the protagonist and the storyteller; given that almost all authors agree on a distinction between processes that are unconscious, rapid, automatic, and high capacity, (System 1 processing) and those that are conscious, slow, and deliberative (System 2 processing, see Evans, 2008), VNA enables and enriches processing particularly relating to system 1 processing–enabling more emotional versus rational processing. Third, creating VNA of stories is inherently and uniquely fulfilling/ pleasurable/healing for the artist; using visual media allows artists to express emotions of the protagonist and/or audience member, to vent anger, or report bliss about events and outcomes that words alone cannot communicate; VNA provides a tangible, emotional, and holistic (gestalt) experience that is uniquely satisfying and does so in a form that many audience members enjoy over and over again. Chapter 4 elaborates on the rationales for its central proposition, briefly reviews relevant literature on VNA, and illustrates one mode of VNA for the complementary stories told by a consumer and brand.

Details

Case Study Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-461-4

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2013

Seulgi Lee and Eunju Ko

This study explores the meaning of Cinderella archetype through the use of visual narrative art (VNA) created from the chosen motion film. First, the present study…

Abstract

This study explores the meaning of Cinderella archetype through the use of visual narrative art (VNA) created from the chosen motion film. First, the present study describes basic concepts of several qualitative research methodologies including visual sociology, cognitive sculpting (CS), storytelling, and VNA. Mapping contexts that the movie describes deepens the understanding of the stories and enactments. Second, the paper briefly examines the Cinderella archetype in storytelling. Finally, the paper illustrates VNA via CS of a subject movie for improving interpretations and sense-making of the story.

Details

Luxury Fashion and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-211-0

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Shelley Margaret Hannigan and Jo Raphael

This paper explains a collaborative self-study research project that included an evolving arts-based inquiry (ABI) approach. The combined experiences of a visual artist/art

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explains a collaborative self-study research project that included an evolving arts-based inquiry (ABI) approach. The combined experiences of a visual artist/art educator and a drama educator, informed the design and use of ABI strategies to investigate practices of Australian teacher educator-researchers. These strategies are shared along with results from interviews that reveal the dynamics and value of this particular model of ABI within a larger research project.

Design/methodology/approach

ABI was included in the methodology of collaborative self-study. It involved listening to participants’ arts-based and written responses then basing the next provocations on these outcomes. This gave ownership to the group members and reinforced the community of practice foci.

Findings

ABI challenged academic identities and practices. It allowed for more enjoyment in the workplace, for reflection and reflective practice to develop. It provided opportunities for shifting perspectives and perceiving teaching practice differently, inspiring more creativity in teaching. It also improved relationships with co-workers and held the group together.

Research limitations/implications

The authors share this research to recommend others a way to collaborate within group research projects.

Practical implications

The authors found it vital to have a co-ABI facilitator from within the group to collaborate with, in order to develop the most appropriate ABI provocations within an emerging research project.

Social implications

This model of research can generate honest and in-depth insights for participants (members of a community of practice) as to how and why they do the work (practices) they do.

Originality/value

The study’s use of ABI offers an original perspective in the use of this methodology.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2013

Arch G. Woodside, Suresh Sood and Karlan M. Muniz

The main thesis here is that the stories that some brands tell to consumers enable consumers to achieve archetypal experiences. Examining the stories consumers tell in…

Abstract

The main thesis here is that the stories that some brands tell to consumers enable consumers to achieve archetypal experiences. Examining the stories consumers tell in natural contexts involving shopping for and using brands informs explanations of associations of archetypes, brands, and consumers. The study advances the use of degrees-of-freedom analysis (DFA) and creating visual narrative art (VNA) as useful steps for confirming or disconfirming whether or not the stories consumers tell have themes, events, and outcomes that match with the core storylines told by brands. As a proposal, an extension of thematic apperception tests (TATs) is relevant in applying the DFA to brand-consumer storytelling research. The study includes a review of early work on TATs, DFA, archetypal theory, and how brands become icons. The study's theory, method, and findings provide useful tools for brand managers and researchers on issues that relate to psychology and marketing.

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2013

Kyung Hoon Kim and Bing Xu

This study explores archetypes of luxury brand Chanel through the use of visual narrative art created from studying consumer blog entries. The chapter describes visual

Abstract

This study explores archetypes of luxury brand Chanel through the use of visual narrative art created from studying consumer blog entries. The chapter describes visual narrative art as a qualitative research tool. Mapping contexts and stories that blog entries describe figure out the archetype of the brand. This study extends understanding of archetypes of luxury brand from different consumers’ perspectives.

Details

Luxury Fashion and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-211-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2020

Christin Seifert and Veena Chattaraman

This study aims to provide a holistic understanding of how visual storytelling influences the objective and subjective cognitive responses of consumers, namely objective…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a holistic understanding of how visual storytelling influences the objective and subjective cognitive responses of consumers, namely objective aesthetic impression and subjective aesthetic association, and aesthetic judgments in response to differing levels of novelty in design innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-factorial experimental study manipulating the novelty of chair designs (moderate/high) and visual design stories (present/absent) was conducted among 263 female US consumers to test the proposed research model.

Findings

With respect to the main effects of novelty and visual design stories, consumers had more positive cognitive responses and aesthetic judgments to: product designs with moderate (vs high) novelty; and products with visual design stories than without. A significant interaction effect uncovered that visual design stories particularly aided products with high (vs moderate) design novelty with respect to objective aesthetic impressions. Examination of the structural relationships between the variables revealed that subjective aesthetic associations mediate the relationship between objective aesthetic impressions and aesthetic judgments.

Practical implications

To mitigate risk in radical design innovations, marketers should use visual storytelling to communicate product form associations and enable consumers to successfully decode the meaning of novel designs during initial encounters.

Originality/value

By examining a holistic model involving both perceptual and conceptual product concepts, this study fills a critical research void to develop insightful implications on bridging the gap between novel product designs and consumer understanding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2016

Toni Eagar and Stephen Dann

This research was conducted to outline the capturing and analysis of composite texts. We contextualize this using selfies as image and textual data sourced from Instagram…

Abstract

Purpose

This research was conducted to outline the capturing and analysis of composite texts. We contextualize this using selfies as image and textual data sourced from Instagram and analyzed using a three stage analysis approach from a genre perspective.

Methodology/approach

The capturing of composite texts is outlined for numerous services available to researchers to study social media contexts. The analysis applies a three-stage technique of (1) what is shown, (2) what is said, and (3) what is the central narrative to overcome interpretive limitations of privileging text over image or vice versa.

Findings

Based on their structural characteristics, seven genre types emerged from the coded sample set.

Research limitations/implications

Issues arise in capturing this data as social media platforms change their access and usage policies and as capturing services alter their capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper outlines a novel approach to capturing and understanding the mimesis and diegesis of selfies as composite texts.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-495-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Stephen Lloyd

– This paper aims to enrich discussion on pilgrimage tourism by analyzing motivations for visiting Sissinghurst, and of essential components of the pilgrimage experience.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enrich discussion on pilgrimage tourism by analyzing motivations for visiting Sissinghurst, and of essential components of the pilgrimage experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes data triangulation and the application of two powerful Jungian archetypes to decode motivations to manage and to participate in a journey to an iconic pilgrimage site (Sigginghurst Castle Garden, in Kent, England and administered by the National Trust) using the analysis of interview-based, published, broadcast media and internet blog storytelling.

Findings

Pilgrim tourists seek and achieve individuation by being part of the essential experience of a site; with its founders, its owners and management and with its continuing re-birth story.

Research limitations/implications

The paper illustrates the application of Jungian archetypes to identify motivations to engage in a tourism experience and as a means for managers to identify a destination's essential characteristics.

Practical implications

This work provides a means for managers to identify a destination's essential characteristics.

Originality/value

The paper documents an original research approach to a previously under-researched research topic.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate the impact of different cues-in-contexts affecting the implicit thinking and sensemaking of the observer (e.g., researcher) to the emic story…

Abstract

Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate the impact of different cues-in-contexts affecting the implicit thinking and sensemaking of the observer (e.g., researcher) to the emic story being told in the visuals. The creation of Figs. 2 and 3 rests on a theoretical platform of Carl Jung's (2009) archetypal theory and method of decoding his own dreams. Jung's (2009) paintings of his dreams to enable conscious interpretation of his conversations within the collective unconscious inform a call for creating visual narrative art to inform meanings of personal and collective unconscious relating to stories consumers tell about buying and using brands.The collective unconscious contains the wisdom and experience of untold ages and thus represents an unparalleled guide for explaining the meaning of what is happening and what will happen. “Active imagination” and “self-experimentation” are terms Jung refers to in his use of paintings and sculpture to create dialogues between “directed thinking” (conscious thinking or what in the 21st century is referred to as “system 2 thinking”) and fantasy thinking (personal and collective unconscious, what is similar to “system 1 thinking,” see Evans, 2003). (Woodside, Megehee, & Sood, 2011).

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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