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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Huilin Liang and Qingping Zhang

Can Chinese social media data (SMD) be used as an alternative to traditional surveys used to understand tourists' visitation of attractions in Chinese cities? The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Can Chinese social media data (SMD) be used as an alternative to traditional surveys used to understand tourists' visitation of attractions in Chinese cities? The purpose of this paper is to explore this question.

Design/methodology/approach

Popular tourism SMD sources in China, such as Ctrip, Weibo and Dazhong Dianping (DZDP), were used as data source, and the relationships between these sources and traditional data sources were studied with statistical methods. Data from Shanghai were used in this study since it is rich in tourism resources and developed in information.

Findings

A systematic research method was followed and led to the following conclusions: There were positive correlations for attraction visitation between Chinese SMD and traditional survey data; Chinese SMD source could temporally indicate visits to Shanghai tourist attractions; Ctrip SMD generally performed less well than Weibo or DZDP, and different SMD performed differently depending on the specific attractions and time units in the visitation calculation process; and factors including visitation, distance from the city center and the grade of attractions might affect the prediction performance based on data from the SMD. The findings suggest that Chinese SMD could be used as a cost-efficient and reliable proxy for traditional survey data to predict Chinese attraction visitation.

Originality/value

This study applies and improves the methods of SMD reliability in attraction use studies, supplies the gap for premise, basis and foundation for the large amounts of tourism researches using SMD in China and could promote and inspire more efficient and advanced measures in tourism management and urban development.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2014

Simona Giorgi, Margaret E. Guider and Jean M. Bartunek

We discuss a recent effort of institutional resistance in the context of the 2008–2011 Apostolic Visitation of U.S. women religious motivated by Vatican concerns about…

Abstract

We discuss a recent effort of institutional resistance in the context of the 2008–2011 Apostolic Visitation of U.S. women religious motivated by Vatican concerns about perceived secularism and potential lack of fidelity among Catholic sisters. We examined the process of and women’s responses to the Visitation to shed light on the institutional work associated with productive resistance and the role of identity and emotions in transforming institutions.

At a time when the male leadership can be blamed for leading the church to a state of crisis – a time when the voices of women are needed more than ever – even the modest roles accorded to female clerics have come under attack. The specific reasons for the investigation are unclear (or, more probably, not public), but the suspicion, clearly, can be put in the crassest terms: too many American nuns have gone off the reservation.

– Lisa Miller, Female Troubles, Newsweek, May 27, 2010

At a time when the male leadership can be blamed for leading the church to a state of crisis – a time when the voices of women are needed more than ever – even the modest roles accorded to female clerics have come under attack. The specific reasons for the investigation are unclear (or, more probably, not public), but the suspicion, clearly, can be put in the crassest terms: too many American nuns have gone off the reservation.

Details

Religion and Organization Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-693-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Karin Alant and Johan Bruwer

The purpose of this paper is to discern the intra‐regional visitation patterns of wine tourists. Exploratory research was conducted in two branded wine regions, to…

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1738

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discern the intra‐regional visitation patterns of wine tourists. Exploratory research was conducted in two branded wine regions, to conceptualise the spatial movement of wine tourists in a theoretical construct.

Design/methodology/approach

Information was obtained from a random sample of 214 visitors to 25 wineries in two branded wine regions in South Australia. Data were collected by means of face‐to‐face interviews using a highly structured questionnaire at each of the winery cellar door venues.

Findings

A conceptual theory regarding winery visitation sets (VSs) was developed. Discernable spatial visitation patterns to wineries result from the dynamic interaction of visitors’ needs and the incumbent winery profiles that exist in a hierarchy within a wine region. The grouping of sequentially visited wineries in the three‐tier hierarchy form specific VSs of wineries. Winery profiles are initially determined by visitation incidence: the most visited Regional Centre Point (RCP) winery is followed by sequentially less visited regional profile (RP) wineries and a third tier of regional attribute (RA) wineries. Visitation pattern trends are identifiable and differ between first‐time and repeat visitors.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible to detail the market segmentation of wine tourists quite accurately in terms of their psychographics and demographics and favoured visitation patterns within the branded wine region. This will also provide important insights into the balance of winery and cellar door roles in the region and confirm the “optimal” number of wineries required to fulfil the needs of the ever‐increasing numbers of wine tourists.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to academic researchers, wine industry practitioners and travel and accommodation providers alike as it provides the foundation for a conceptual theory to explain the discernable intra‐regional visitation patterns of wine tourists to the cellar doors of wineries.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Salmi Mohd Isa and Lizana Ramli

To establish tourist visitation to new tourism areas is in most cases dependent on tourists' behavior. Indeed, tourist visitation is considered among the primary…

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4900

Abstract

Purpose

To establish tourist visitation to new tourism areas is in most cases dependent on tourists' behavior. Indeed, tourist visitation is considered among the primary components of the marine tourism operation. Such behavior is usually enacted in the form of destination awareness, destination image and motivation. Word of mouth is likely to influence tourist to visit. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that may influence tourists to visit marine tourist destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study has utilized self-administered questionnaire survey and the target population are the visitors that came to FRI Aquarium. The survey period was from August 2012 to September 2012. Total of 179 responses were collected during this period.

Findings

This study demonstrates that destination awareness, motivation and WOM are factors that influence the tourist to visit the FRI Aquarium. Interestingly, destination image however, has shown insignificant relationship with tourist visitation. WOM also found to be has a full mediating effect for awareness towards tourist visitation. For example, before visit, visitor may require some information beforehand and word of mouth is a direct medium to transfer the information. A key implication for FRI Aquarium is that it might be wise to assess such variables for their marketing strategies.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample was obtained from one marine aquarium in Malaysia. The comparative studies between aquariums are important to understand if there are any similarities and differences. It would be better to conduct the survey in other local aquariums such as the Underwater World, Langkawi and the KL Aquaria, Kuala Lumpur. Second, a longitudinal study is relevant to further investigate the factors that will influence the visitor visitation. Thus, future study should gather data from those who had visited the aquarium several times. This approach might improve the destination image results, which in this study shows insignificant relationship. That said, acknowledgements of these limitations also suggest a new direction of future research.

Practical implications

FRI Aquarium is suggested to create more awareness to the public by placing an advertisement via mainstream and social media. Hence, FRI Aquarium is suggested to design environmentally marine life oriented educational programs in order to motivate and encourage more visitors to visit the place.

Originality/value

In sum, this paper conjectures that an understanding of factors that influence the tourist to visit the marine tourism destination are worthy of additional research. Consequently, the findings help to understand how these factors can provide alternative sources of marketing to attract the long-term economic sustainability of the FRI Aquarium in marine tourism.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

A.J. Templeton, Kelly Goonan and Alan Fyall

National Park Service (NPS) units generate a significant economic impact for states and local gateway communities across the USA. Utah is home to 13 NPS units with…

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1078

Abstract

Purpose

National Park Service (NPS) units generate a significant economic impact for states and local gateway communities across the USA. Utah is home to 13 NPS units with visitation accounting for 18% of the state's US$9.75bn tourism economy in 2018. Twelve NPS units, including five national parks, are located in Southern Utah, driving an economy that is heavily dependent on tourism. This paper examines the challenges and opportunities for visits to national parks post-COVID-19, generally and in the specific context of Southern Utah. Although the assumption is that visits to national parks will recover quickly, this paper will critically examine how visitation may change and what adaptive measures and alternative forms of unit management may be necessary.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting a holistic-inductive paradigm, this paper utilizes a descriptive case study approach. Data were collected across a variety of mediums focusing on interviews with key stakeholders in and around Southern Utah.

Findings

The results from this study highlight the various challenges faced in parks and gateway communities vis-à-vis changing patterns of visitation, adaptive measures and alternative forms of unit management necessary due to COVID-19 and their impact on the future management and marketing of national parks for touristic purposes.

Originality/value

This paper examines the impacts of COVID-19 on an often-neglected yet significant area within tourism, yielding implications for industry, visitors and destination communities.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Pandora L. Kay, Emma Wong and Michael Jay Polonsky

The purpose of this paper is to draw together the previous academic and industry research on non‐attendance of cultural attractions, followed by qualitative in‐depth…

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3076

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw together the previous academic and industry research on non‐attendance of cultural attractions, followed by qualitative in‐depth interviews to identify commonalities or gaps in the previous research on barriers, constraints and inhibitors, as well as to propose linkages between these.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐method approach is used – where barriers, constraints and inhibitors are identified by means of thematic content analysis of the literature. A set of probing questions is developed based on these themes and is then examined in in‐depth interviews with individuals that had not visited cultural attractions in the past two years, in an attempt to triangulate data, as well as to identify connections between barriers.

Findings

From the literature, eight interconnected barriers to visitation are identified: physical access; personal access; cost; time and timing; product; personal interest and peer group; socialisation and understanding; and information. The in‐depth interviews generally support these, although it is also identified that there are complex interrelationships between the issues.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the neglected question of why people do not attend cultural attractions by triangulating thematic findings from the content analysis of diverse literature with in‐depth interview responses from one non‐visitor segment. This results in an interconnected model of barriers that can be used to assist managers to develop strategies addressing low visitation rates within targeted segments.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Adlin Baizura Ariffin, Mohd Salehuddin Mohd Zahari and Mohd Hafiz Hanafiah

This article aims to illustrate the influence of the adaptive reuse of historic buildings on tourists’ appreciation and actual visitation.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to illustrate the influence of the adaptive reuse of historic buildings on tourists’ appreciation and actual visitation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed the perception of tourists on the adaptive reuse of historic buildings activity in Kuching city, Malaysia, via the causal research design and self-administered questionnaire. Two hundred forty-two respondents participated in this survey.

Findings

This study found that the tourists highly acknowledged the practices of adaptive reuse of the historic buildings. Their positive behaviour is evident when most of the tourists perceived the adaptive reuse of the historic buildings influence their level of appreciation and subsequently translated it into their actual visitation.

Practical implications

Based on these findings, this study proposes that the adaptive reuse of historic buildings be marketed as a heritage tourism product. This promising indication from the tourists will undoubtedly draw several practical implications to the local authority policy on the practices of historic buildings adaptive reuse and how it benefits the heritage tourism development.

Originality/value

This study confirms that adaptive reuse is an excellent initiative as it is not only preserving the historical treasures for future generations but is a catalyst for tourism development and helps to generate income for the community.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Meg Houghton

For many wineries and wine regions the annual wine festival is a strategic tool for encouraging cellar door visitation. Wine festivals offer the opportunity to socialise…

Abstract

For many wineries and wine regions the annual wine festival is a strategic tool for encouraging cellar door visitation. Wine festivals offer the opportunity to socialise, possibly with friends and family, whilst learning about and enjoying a natural, agricultural setting and product. Revenue and recognition is generated for the participating wineries, awareness of the area and its resources is enhanced, and the community at large and outside providers find a new source of customers. Whilst this is a worthy list of benefits for all stakeholders, is there a longer‐term direct benefit to wineries? This study of wine festival participants looks at the propensity of wine festival attendees to be persuaded to revisit the participating wineries as a consequence of their attendance at a wine festival. The paper concludes that there are positive future visitation benefits not just for the wineries staging the festival but also the influence extends and benefits the wider industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Susan Warner

Flexible scheduling in school libraries is supported by the American Association for School Libraries (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and…

Abstract

Flexible scheduling in school libraries is supported by the American Association for School Libraries (AASL) and the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). Support is based on the constructivist theory of learning and posits increased learning, collaboration, and visitations by classes, small groups, and individuals to the availability of resources during the time of need, yet there is no direct evidence to support flexible scheduling. The quantitative study sought to examine the relationship between media center scheduling on students’ academic achievement, teacher and media specialist collaboration, and class visitation in an elementary school. The researcher utilized an experimental posttest-only control group design. The point-biserial correlation was utilized to identify any relationship between groups who utilized the media center on a fixed versus a flexible schedule and criterion-referenced test scores. No significant relationship was found between scheduling patterns, student achievement, and collaboration. However, the research supported increased number of visitations by classes on a fixed schedule.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-287-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Sergio Moreno-Gil and J.R. Brent Ritchie

This paper aims to better understand museums’ image. The study examined the influence of visitors’ socio-demographic (gender, social class), tripographic (party group…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to better understand museums’ image. The study examined the influence of visitors’ socio-demographic (gender, social class), tripographic (party group, previous experience with the museum and timing of the decision to visit the museum) and geographic characteristics (national – international visitors), on the different components and dimensions of perceived museums’ image (cognitive and affective) in a major tourism destination.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focussed on museums located on Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). The population of the study included museum attendees who visited the main museums of the island (13 museums). The selection of respondents (252) was made following a systematic random sampling at the exit gate of the museums.

Findings

The repeat visitors and those who plan the visit in advance were found to have a more positive museums’ image for both the cognitive and the affective components of museum image. There was also a positive influence of party group on the cognitive and affective dimensions of image, whereas families showed a less positive image. In addition, there were significant relationships between the visitors’ socio-demographic characteristics of gender, and social class, and the affective and cognitive components of image – women and higher classes achieving a better image. National visitors also showed a more positive image on both the cognitive and affective components of museum image. Six image dimensions were found and specific effects on each are discussed.

Originality/value

This study adds to the growing literature on museums for a better understanding of the perceived image of this cultural product (museums) at the destination, and how it can be managed according to the profile of their publics. Additionally, it considers the different dimensions of museums’ image: quality of visitation experience, convenience and functionality, price, general appearance, museum shop and affective image.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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