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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2006

Patricia Tuitt

The political landscape that has been unfolding since the attacks on the World Trade Centre in September 2001 has created an urgent imperative for a reappraisal of the…

Abstract

The political landscape that has been unfolding since the attacks on the World Trade Centre in September 2001 has created an urgent imperative for a reappraisal of the place of individual force within philosophies of violence, particularly those that are directed to law. An extensive critique of the relation between law and violence has emerged around the works of philosophers, such as Walter Benjamin, Franz Fanon, Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben (1998, In: D.H. Roazen (Trans.), Homo sacer: Sovereign power and bare life. California: Stanford University Press), but it is questionable whether any of these provide us with the conceptual tools with which to address what is being presented (correctly or otherwise) as a particular problematic of the 21st century. Indeed, I would argue that a certain intellectual malaise surrounds discussion around individual force and that this state of affairs is in large measure due to the way in which critical theory and philosophy has addressed questions concerning the relation between individual violence and the juridical order. Without exception such accounts declare that individual violence undermines the authority of law itself. The following seeks to interrogate this contention and in doing so to begin to construct a more nuanced way of conceiving how the law preserves its authority.

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-323-5

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Olufemi Adeniyi Fawole and Ebenezer Bayode Agboola

Dating violence has, in recent times, been a social problem that has been creating different levels of concern especially among parents, and those in the academia, in…

Abstract

Purpose

Dating violence has, in recent times, been a social problem that has been creating different levels of concern especially among parents, and those in the academia, in Nigeria. Studies have shown causes to be largely due to personality types, but little relate it with violence between the parents of the perpetrator. This study examines the influence of violence between parents and the effect on dating violence among students in Nigerian Universities.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Questionnaires were administered to 460 students who had experienced violence in their dating relationship. The study had 55.7% of the respondents being females.

Findings

All of the respondents had experienced dating violence at one point or the other in their relationship. About 36.7% of the respondents reported to having been in dating relationship with a partner who had witnessed violence in the home. Data analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Co-efficient indicate that the variables of parental conflict and dating violence were significantly positively correlated among the students.

Originality/Value

The study was limited because it focuses on only one university, and research in the area of dating violence in Nigeria has not been extensively reported. The study therefore emphasizes the impact of socialization process on dating behavior of young adults in Nigeria as well as the need to have further studies on these dating patterns. This study will serve as addition to the gradually increasing literature on dating behavior of young adults in the Nigerian society.

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Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Jill Radford

Effective professional approaches to the issue of domestic violence are in danger of being undermined by a lack of clarity in definition. This article argues that the…

Abstract

Effective professional approaches to the issue of domestic violence are in danger of being undermined by a lack of clarity in definition. This article argues that the gender neutral specification of domestic violence, the breadth of circumstances that comprise it and the encouragement of local variations allow a shift of focus away from the real problem of violence by males upon females and coherent crime reduction strategies.

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jackie Barron

This paper is based on a survey of service provision for women experiencing domestic violence and who have additional complex mental health or substance use needs. Postal…

Abstract

This paper is based on a survey of service provision for women experiencing domestic violence and who have additional complex mental health or substance use needs. Postal questionnaires were sent to domestic violence organisations, community mental health teams, mental health NHS trusts and substance use services. The views of women survivors of domestic violence were also sought. The survey, undertaken by Women's Aid, identifies some shortcomings in existing provision and makes recommendations for future development of services. More refuge provision is needed which can accommodate women with mental health and substance use needs, and their children.Mental health professionals and those working in drug and alcohol services also need training in domestic violence, to enable them to respond more appropriately to the needs of abused women and to work effectively in partnership with refuge organisations.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Heather Barclay and Diane Mulligan

Efforts at tackling different forms of targeted violence may benefit from lessons generated from the longer‐standing work in tackling violence against women. These include…

Abstract

Efforts at tackling different forms of targeted violence may benefit from lessons generated from the longer‐standing work in tackling violence against women. These include the conceptualisation and articulation of targeted violence as a cause and consequence of inequality, and as a human rights issue. There is a need to develop effective coalitions and to make explicit the relevance and implications of targeted violence across all public services so that those affected receive the support they require. The importance of education and prevention is also highlighted. While such lessons can help reframe the issues and policies around targeted violence, they should not be transposed uncritically.

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Safer Communities, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Sexual Violence on Campus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-229-1

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2006

Katalin Fábián

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists paid special attention to domestic…

Abstract

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists paid special attention to domestic violence. In post-communist Europe, it took even longer but the Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, and Slovene governments eventually reacted to domestic and global pressure and established new definitions and norms dealing with domestic violence. Analyzing the process of norm development on domestic violence in Central Europe can direct us toward determining to what extent political and economic processes and decisions in Europe are driving globalization, or are being driven by globalization.

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European Responses to Globalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-364-8

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Avery Everhart and Gwen Hunnicutt

This research explores the experiences of self-identified queer victims of intimate partner violence, their personal encounters with violence-response organizations, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the experiences of self-identified queer victims of intimate partner violence, their personal encounters with violence-response organizations, and the extent to which their gender/sexual identity impacted their willingness to disclose their abuse.

Design/methodology/approach

Eleven respondents were recruited from online queer social networking sites and were interviewed via e-mail or Skype.

Findings

All respondents identified as gender variant or had an abusive partner who identified as gender variant. All study participants reported having experienced physical abuse. Several reported sexual and emotional abuse. Respondents reported a reluctance to seek institutional support and intervention. Several respondents were unable to recognize abuse as abuse until much later. When asked about whether or not they sought intervention, most respondents in this study described a sort of isolation, where they perceived that they were facing prejudice and stigmatization, and risked being dismissed and delegitimized. Several respondents sensed that there simply were no organizations that were sensitized and available to queer-identified victims. Even if they had pursued help from existing institutions, several respondents communicated a doubt that they could truly be of service, since these institutions likely operated with heteronormative narratives and practices. Collectively, the respondents in this study describe experiences as victims of IPV that are clearly mediated by homophobia and cissism.

Implications

We emphasize the need for an “intersectional awareness” in scholarship and organizing surrounding IPV. We critique the state’s gender-based practices of violence intervention and propose alternative possibilities for more inclusive intervention and organizing on behalf of queer victims of violence.

Originality/value

The body of literature that exists on IPV among LGBTQ persons is small, and much of this literature is focused on how patterns of IPV differ from heterosexual violence. In exploring IPV among self-identified queer victims, we depart from most research on IPV in that our analysis is not so much concerned with the gender or sex assignment of the victim, but rather the gendered context in which the violence is playing out.

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Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Book part
Publication date: 15 October 2013

Bianca Baggiarini

This chapter discusses how private military corporations (PMCs) and their employees have been implicated in discourses and practices of sexual violence. I examine how PMCs…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses how private military corporations (PMCs) and their employees have been implicated in discourses and practices of sexual violence. I examine how PMCs have become seemingly permanent fixtures of international relations since the end of the Cold War. Furthermore, the purpose is to contribute to the ongoing conversations about PMCs and gender. To do this, I examine one instance of sexual violence in the context of PMCs. I argue that, since the legal case was forced into private arbitration, this maneuver reflects critical shifts in the normalizing power of law, away from a model of a social contract toward global neoliberal economics.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing postmodern feminist theory alongside a Foucauldian discourse analysis, I explore the case of one PMC contractor who alleged rape by multiple coworkers in Iraq. I examine the limitations of standpoint feminism in relation to theories and representations of sexual violence.

Social implications

I claim that military outsourcing raises serious concerns for feminists theorizing issues of gender and wartime sexual violence. PMC personnel are unaccountable when they are implicated in cases of sexual violence. Feminist critique is urgent given the various ways PMCs have been implicated in reproducing gender inequality and in sexual violence.

Originality/value

This chapter advances feminist knowledge about wartime sexual violence in a context where PMCs now play a significant role in the reproduction of practices that normalize sexual violence in public and private militarized spaces, both “at home” and “abroad.”

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Gendered Perspectives on Conflict and Violence: Part A
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-110-6

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2010

Glenn W. Muschert and Anthony A. Peguero

Purpose – This chapter explores the problem of school shootings as a source of anxiety and fear in schools. Such fear has generated calls for security in schools and has…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores the problem of school shootings as a source of anxiety and fear in schools. Such fear has generated calls for security in schools and has been a catalyst for the development and deployment of antiviolence policies in schools.

Methodology/approach – The chapter begins by examining the development of the Columbine Effect, which is a set of emotions surrounding youth social problems, particularly violence in schools. This Columbine Effect is then explored in relation to its role in the development of policies to mitigate the problem of school violence. These purposes are linked using a multilevel typology of school violence and their sources, created by Henry (2009).

Findings – The chapter explores the levels of violence addressed by six antiviolence policies: crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), zero tolerance, anti-bullying programming, emergency management planning, peer mediation, and school climate programming. The analysis indicates the level(s) of violence each type of policy is designed to address and identifies research evidence regarding the efficacy of each policy. The analysis also focuses on the unintended consequences of school antiviolence policies, especially those which reduce violence on one or more levels, while exacerbating the problem on other levels.

Research limitations/implications – The analytical approach was selective, rather than exhaustive. Nonetheless, the analysis has suggested a number of ironies concerning the unintended consequences of antiviolence programming in schools. This suggests the need for broader analysis in this area.

Practical implications – The analysis identifies a number of detrimental effects that have resulted from school violence policy initiatives ranging from the socialization of youth toward a society of control and authority. In addition, the chapter helps to clarify the (often negative) effects of hype about violence in schools.

Originality/value of chapter – Although not often connected, this chapter explores the intersection between the discourse of school violence (typically, a social problems framing concern) and the development of school antiviolence policies (typically, an applied social scientific concern).

Details

New Approaches to Social Problems Treatment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-737-0

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