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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Boniface Michael and Rashmi Michael

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association between memory (short- and long-term), a foundational cognition in learning and face-to-face, video-based and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the association between memory (short- and long-term), a foundational cognition in learning and face-to-face, video-based and flipped instructional modalities.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a one-way analysis of variance and linear regression analyses to compare students’ aggregated answers on multiple-choice questions over two different periods, including a repeat question from an earlier examination. Also, student-level answers were subjected to a binary logistic regression.

Findings

Face-to-face unambiguously was associated with superior short-term memory including ethics. Video-based performance was associated with a superior long-term memory, and flipped’s performance lay in between for both memory types.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not account for students’ learning styles, instructors’ preferred teaching approach and computer-aided virtual simulations.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may serve as a reference point for optimally blending multiple instruction modalities to leverage its association with memory for learning matched to instructors’ styles, students’ curricular pathway and coping with institutional imperatives.

Social implications

This paper provides a way for higher education institutions to match instructional modalities to memory needs, including business ethics as students’ progress on their pathways towards graduation.

Originality/value

This study illuminates the association between memory, a widely accepted foundational cognition in learning that has been under researched compared to critical thinking and reasoning, and three instructional modalities: face-to-face, video-based and flipped classroom.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Abstract

Details

Viewpoints on Interventions for Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-089-1

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Emily Bouck and Rajiv Satsangi

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation…

Abstract

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation and achievement of students with disabilities in mathematics in general and in inclusive mathematics settings in particular. In this chapter, assistive technology to academic and functional mathematics will be discussed; particularly, manipulatives, calculators and other technology-mediated mathematics interventions (e.g., apps or computer programs) will be highlighted.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Cheryl Rosaen

This critical analysis investigates 23 studies on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation to gain a better understanding of the potential of…

Abstract

Purpose

This critical analysis investigates 23 studies on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation to gain a better understanding of the potential of video-based pedagogy for supporting pre-service teachers’ development of the complex set of knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed for teaching literacy in today’s classrooms.

Methodology/approach

This study extends what has been learned from prior reviews to investigate research focused on the use of video in pre-service literacy teacher preparation with particular attention paid to the extent to which pre-service teachers’ work with video helps them examine literacy teaching and learning in relation to race, language, culture, and power.

Findings

Working with video has strong potential for engaging pre-service teachers in reflecting on their own teaching, deepening their understanding of the challenges of engaging in literacy practices, fostering expertise in systematically describing, reflecting on, and analyzing their teaching, providing multiple perspectives on instruction, analyzing and assessing student growth, and discussing developmentally appropriate instruction. Results were mixed regarding changing teachers’ knowledge and beliefs. Overall, the tasks pre-service teachers completed did not explicitly guide them to focus on the relationship between characteristics of the diverse learners featured in the videos and issues of teaching and learning.

Practical implications

Literacy teacher educators could do more to take advantage of the affordances of using video to work more explicitly toward goals of helping pre-service teachers develop a critical consciousness, an inquiring stance, and a sense of agency, along with examining teaching practices that represent culturally responsive teaching. Pre-service teachers need explicit guidance in what to observe for and more focused discussion regarding their developing knowledge and beliefs about student diversity.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2015

Mark W. Conley and Hosun Kang

To demonstrate how teacher candidate narratives in response to videos depicting science and literacy instruction can be used to both teach and evaluate beginning teachers…

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate how teacher candidate narratives in response to videos depicting science and literacy instruction can be used to both teach and evaluate beginning teachers’ emerging conceptions of disciplinary literacy.

Methodology/approach

Teacher candidates viewed and responded to videos depicting exemplary practice in science education and then videos of their own practice. Qualitative discourse analysis was used to investigate the science teacher candidates’ interpretations of problems of practice, their views of scientific literacy and understandings of their students.

Findings

The teacher candidates displayed distaste for textbooks, reinforced by negative experiences with textbooks in school settings, and yet they viewed textbooks as essential for effectively teaching knowledge about science. At the same time, each viewed the natural world as the ideal “text” for teaching knowledge about science, at times compensating for the weaknesses of textbooks and at other times entirely replacing textbooks as the source of knowledge about science. We consider what this means for preparing teachers for effective subject matter and literacy practice.

Practical implications

Video reflections like these demonstrate that what teacher candidates understand about video representations of others’ and their own teaching are far from literal and are interpreted through the educational and background lenses of the teacher candidates’ themselves. We suggest that a great deal more work needs to be done to better understand how to use video reflection to best develop teacher candidates’ conceptions of subject matter and literacy practice.

Details

Video Research in Disciplinary Literacies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-678-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Wu He, Ivan Ash, Mohd Anwar, Ling Li, Xiaohong Yuan, Li Xu and Xin Tian

An organization’s ability to successfully manage intellectual capital is determined by the actions of its employees to prevent or minimize information security incidents…

Abstract

Purpose

An organization’s ability to successfully manage intellectual capital is determined by the actions of its employees to prevent or minimize information security incidents. To prevent more data breaches to intellectual capital, organizations must provide regular cybersecurity awareness training for all personnel. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of different evidence-based cybersecurity training methods on employees’ cybersecurity risk perception and self-reported behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The study participants were randomly assigned into four groups (i.e. malware report, malware videos, both malware report and malware videos and no interventions) to assess the effects of cybersecurity training on their perceptions of vulnerability, severity, self-efficacy, security intention as well as their self-reported cybersecurity behaviors.

Findings

The results show that evidence-based malware report is a relatively better training method in affecting employees’ intentions of engaging in recommended cybersecurity behaviors comparing with the other training methods used in this study. A closer analysis suggests whether the training method contains self-relevant information could make a difference to the training effects.

Originality/value

This paper reports an in-depth investigation on how different evidence-based cybersecurity training methods impact employees’ perceptions of susceptibility, severity, self-efficacy, security intention as well as on their self-reported cybersecurity behaviors.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Stacey Jones Bock, Christy M. Borders, Kristi Probst and Shaqwana Freeman-Green

In 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the statistic that 1 out of every 59 children had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)…

Abstract

In 2018, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the statistic that 1 out of every 59 children had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Young children with ASD have unique needs specifically related to the characteristics that impact their communication and social emotional and behavioral development. These unique needs require early and intensive intervention to minimize their lifelong impact. It is important to identify and use evidence-based interventions to help parents support their children at home, and as a continuation of the skills they are being taught in other settings. This chapter will address the prevalence of young children with ASD, the impact and need for family involvement in intervention, and service provision and potential interventions.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Emily C. Bouck and Courtney Maher

The term intellectual disability is broad and encompassing. Regardless of the severity of a child’s intellectual disability, early education is important. This chapter…

Abstract

The term intellectual disability is broad and encompassing. Regardless of the severity of a child’s intellectual disability, early education is important. This chapter discusses educational considerations of young learners with intellectual disability. Specially, the chapter focuses on academics, life skills, social skills and social development, and behavior. Instructional content and instructional strategies are shared for these areas considering young children, although particular attention in paid to preschool and early elementary age students.

Details

Special Education for Young Learners with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-041-3

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Jean Smith

Technology can be both the bane and the boon of bibliographic instruction librarians. While none of us would hesitate to extol the virtues of automation and…

Abstract

Technology can be both the bane and the boon of bibliographic instruction librarians. While none of us would hesitate to extol the virtues of automation and computerization, it becomes more evident that, in some ways, library instruction is driven by technology. Technological advances give us new classes to teach, but also offer new methods of instruction. Considering what we want to teach, and considering the methods available ten years ago as compared to the present, we've come a long way—but so have our students. This is not to say they are any more knowledgeable of library research methods; but rather, computer and video technology are now second nature for them. Introducing this technology into the classroom means we have the ability to provide library instruction in a way that encourages students to learn—on their own terms.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Robert D. Marx and Peter J. Frost

Video has emerged as a widely used teaching tool among management educators in academic and corporate settings. This paper reviews research in comparative media and…

Abstract

Video has emerged as a widely used teaching tool among management educators in academic and corporate settings. This paper reviews research in comparative media and management education to identify how video can be used with traditional written material for optimal educational outcomes. Implications for research and practice are examined.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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