Search results

1 – 10 of 84
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Remko van Hoek and David Loseby

While there is a rich body of risk management literature and while there have been valuable theoretical advancements on the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a rich body of risk management literature and while there have been valuable theoretical advancements on the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on risks, this paper aims to posit that at least four more advancements are needed.

Design/methodology/approach

The co-author from Rolls Royce (RR) illustrates the risks experienced and risk management approaches taken in its manufacturing and supply chain operations both in the earlier stages of the pandemic as well as after the first year of the pandemic.

Findings

The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique risk scenario that is beyond the scope of most existing risk management literature. The impact of the pandemic is very multi-faceted, not location specific but very global and experienced throughout the entire supply chain, across industries and over a much extended timeline with multiple time horizons. In manufacturing operations, there have been major instances of supply chain heroism in the first year of the pandemic and there is a lot more work ahead.

Originality/value

The authors' co-created paper enriches the perspective on COVID-19 research in manufacturing and supply chain operations by pointing at empirical opportunities, the need for more inter disciplinary research and the need to consider multiple time horizons.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Remko I. van Hoek

Both postponement and outsourcing have been identified as important characteristics of modern and competitive supply chains. The implementation of postponement may require…

Downloads
4553

Abstract

Both postponement and outsourcing have been identified as important characteristics of modern and competitive supply chains. The implementation of postponement may require extensive (spatial) reconfiguration of the supply chain. Presents findings from interviews with managers of food, electronics, automotive and clothing manufacturers in The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Findings reveal that in food supply chains both postponement and outsourcing are applied to a lesser extent than in other industries. Reasons, which refer to the industry‐specific characteristics, are given. Ways for food companies to assure competitiveness are then described on the dimensions of postponement, outsourcing and spatial reconfiguration. A framework is developed to position chains in terms of degree of outsourcing, level of postponement and spatial configuration. The framework can help managers diagnosing and repositioning their organizations, along the dimensions mentioned.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Remko van Hoek, David Loseby and Chee Yew Wong

Downloads
446

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 50 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Remko I. van Hoek

The supply chain concept fundamentally changes the nature of organizations; control is no longer based on direct ownership and control, but rather based on integration…

Downloads
9879

Abstract

The supply chain concept fundamentally changes the nature of organizations; control is no longer based on direct ownership and control, but rather based on integration across interfaces between functions and companies. This has consequences for the measurement of performance. Traditional measurement approaches may have to be abolished and a supply chain measurement system developed. Traditional performance measures may limit the possibilities to optimize supply chains as management does not “see” supply chain wide areas for improvement. This note raises issues critical to measuring supply chain performance. A new measurement approach should lead the way for supply chain competitiveness and should direct management attention to areas for supply chain optimization. A preliminary framework for measuring unmeasurable performance is developed.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Laura Birou and Remko Van Hoek

This paper aims to fill a void in existing research by focusing on in-company efforts to develop supply chain (SC) talent, with a specific focus on the role that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to fill a void in existing research by focusing on in-company efforts to develop supply chain (SC) talent, with a specific focus on the role that executives can play in this process. This study uses the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm and theory of training motivation as theoretical background for the exploration. In addition to that, this paper provides meaningful information for executives aspiring to contribute to the development of supply chain management (SCM) talent including the primary drivers, benefits, barriers and bridges (Fawcett et al., 2008). Using this framework will lead to the development of a conceptual model to facilitate future research efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies three case companies where there was an active executive engagement in the recruiting, on-boarding and ongoing development of SC talent.

Findings

In all three case companies’ executive engagement was high and the executives acted as champions of the SC talent development program including designing and stewardship of the program. They also got personally involved in recruiting, training and mentoring. In alignment with the RBV of the firm, all three case companies were strongly driven by a need to improve the competitive advantage of their firm through the SC competencies and capabilities. This strategic directive is driven by the executive suite and typically involved a combination of goals including improving functional capability development, internal stakeholder relationships and growth in business value contributions. This leads to the need for attracting new talent, due to talent shortages and developing more future-proof capabilities of the SC talent. Talent that is future-proof can effectively handle the current scope of work and successfully implement changes that the SCM strategy aspires to. Hence, the executive ownership is very much driven by a strategic imperative to improve the knowledge, skills and abilities and critical realization of the importance of talent recruitment and development. This study also finds that there are very specific SCM drivers, benefits, barriers and bridges in play making it important for SCM executives and teams to engage and not rely on generic human resource (HR) processes and frameworks only.

Research limitations/implications

We found that in the three case companies’ executive engagement in talent development had a positive impact. We also identified specific roles of the executives such as, the benefit of engagement across multiple hierarchical layers of the organization and, the risk of programs being shorter lived when focused on a narrower talent issue. Our research focus contributes to the existing supply chain literature involving talent management. It also suggests actions for supply chain executives, for the educational provision of universities and multiple research opportunities.

Originality/value

There is no evidence of prior research in fields of HR management, talent development or SCM related to the impact of executive engagement in this process. This paper studies three case companies where there was an active executive engagement in the recruiting, on-boarding and ongoing development of SC talent. Findings show the critical impact of personal and extended engagement of senior-level executives and their leadership teams, in SC talent development. This paper offers specific techniques and approaches, generates suggestions for further research, managerial action and university implications.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Remko van Hoek

This paper considers CSCMP Supply Chain Hall of Famer Henry Ford's innovation and its transformative impact on supply chain management. Credited with the assembly line…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper considers CSCMP Supply Chain Hall of Famer Henry Ford's innovation and its transformative impact on supply chain management. Credited with the assembly line, Ford's innovation also included a supply chain design around the concept of flow, integrated supply and the enablement of economies of scale and productivity to drive down consumer prices and create affordable product for a growing market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers literature and builds upon the history of the innovation to consider supply chain implications and future opportunities to further the innovation into modern supply chains.

Findings

Ford did not “invent” the assembly line but he did build the supply chain around it. He stewarded core supply chain principles of great relevance well before they become popular, including a focus on lifelong learning, making failure safe, waste elimination and helping make the world a better place. There are many opportunities to continue to build upon the innovation for future supply chain success.

Originality/value

The supply chain field is sometimes said to be “historically challenged.” This paper reviews the essence and lessons learned from the assembly line and supply chain design and the leadership principles of Henry Ford and the Ford production system. We also connect leadership principles of the Ford supply chain to those of Ohno and Deming to map out the evolution of the Ford supply chain management approach over multiple decades and into the supply chain body of knowledge. Finally, we reflect upon how supply chain design aspects of the Ford supply chain may need to further evolve into the future. Based upon this reflection we recommend opportunities for further research and innovation that build upon the supply chain management roots provided by Henry Ford.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Remko van Hoek

There is great interest in blockchain in the supply chain yet there is little empirical research to support the consideration of the technology. Ferdows (2018) calls for…

Downloads
2922

Abstract

Purpose

There is great interest in blockchain in the supply chain yet there is little empirical research to support the consideration of the technology. Ferdows (2018) calls for research aimed at learning from pioneers in the field and Gartner points out that the interest in blockchain holds similarities to the interest surrounding RFID 15 years ago. As a result, there may be opportunities to leverage insights from RFID research to inform the consideration of blockchain. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Reyes et al. (2016) framework for the implementation of RFID may inform the consideration of blockchain in the supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage approach is used to explore RFID implementation considerations from the Reyes et al. (2016) RFID implementation framework, using an initial exploration of managers interested in blockchain using a focus group and a survey and to more in depth explore three case companies pioneering blockchain.

Findings

Several RFID implementation considerations can inform the consideration of blockchain but there are also differences in considering blockchain. A framework is developed that details considerations found to be relevant by implementation stage.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited amount of empirical research on blockchain in the supply chain and advances research beyond the consideration of use cases into the exploration of actual implementation of blockchain in the supply chain. The decision framework developed both leverages and nuances findings from RFID research and can inform managerial decision making. It also adds to research a multi-stage approach to implementation and uncovers rich opportunity to further learn from pioneers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

van Hoek Remko

The COVID-19 crisis has caused major supply chain disruptions, and these can be traced back to basic supply chain risks that have previously been well identified in…

Downloads
14399

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 crisis has caused major supply chain disruptions, and these can be traced back to basic supply chain risks that have previously been well identified in literature. The purpose of this paper is to suggest a pathway for closing the gap between supply chain resilience research and efforts in industry to develop a more resilient supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon virtual roundtables with supply chain executives, supplemented with interviews and publicly available datapoints about COVID-19 impact on the supply chain, we explore challenges in industry and suggest opportunity areas where research can support efforts in industry to improve supply chain resilience.

Findings

During the COVID-19 crisis, participating supply chain executives are experiencing textbook supply, demand and control risks in the supply chain. They also observe a lack of preparedness, shortcomings of current response plans and the need for greater supply chain resilience. Focus areas in improving resilience mirror generic recommendations from literature and provide a rich opportunity to reduce the gap between research findings and efforts in industry.

Research limitations/implications

More empirical, event-based and less conceptual research into supply chain resilience has been called for several times during the last two decades. COVID-19 provides a very rich opportunity for researchers to conduct the type of research that has been called for. This research may contribute to the structurally de-risking of supply chains. Areas of research opportunity include decision models for supply chain design that avoid overfocusing on costs only, and that consider the value of flexibility, short response times and multiple sources as well as methods for enriching supplier segmentation and evaluation models to reduce a focus on savings and payment terms only.

Practical implications

Key levers for de-risking the supply chain include the need to balance global sourcing with nearshore and local sourcing, the adoption of multiple sources and a greater utilization of information technology to drive more complete and immediate information availability. Perhaps most importantly, talent management in supply chain management needs to promote a focus not just on costs, but also on resilience as well as on learning from current events to improve decision-making.

Social implications

There is a great opportunity for supply chain managers to grow their contribution to society beyond risk response into the proactive reduction of risks for the future. Researchers can serve society by informing this progress with impactful research.

Originality/value

This article offers initial empirical exploration of supply chain risks experienced in the context of COVID-19 and approaches considered in industry to improve supply chain resilience. Opportunities for empirical, event-based and less conceptual research that has been called for years, are identified. This research can help close the gap between supply chain resilience research and efforts in industry to improve supply chain resilience. Hopefully the research opportunities identified can inspire the flurry of research that can be expected in response to the multiple special issues planned by journals in our field.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2013

Heather Lutz and Laura Birou

This paper aims to provide the results of a large‐scale survey of courses dedicated to the field of logistics in higher education. This research is unique because it…

Downloads
1411

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide the results of a large‐scale survey of courses dedicated to the field of logistics in higher education. This research is unique because it represents the first large‐scale study of both undergraduate and graduate logistics courses.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis was performed on each syllabus to identify the actual course coverage: requirements, pedagogy and content emphasis. Content analysis is a descriptive approach to categorize data and the results may be limited by the categorizations used in analysis. This aggregated information was utilized to compare historical research findings in this area with the current skills identified as important for career success. These data provide input for gap analysis between offerings in higher education and those needs identified by practitioners.

Findings

Data gathering efforts yielded a sample of 118 logistics courses representing 77 schools and six different countries. The aggregate number of topics covered in undergraduate courses totalled 95, while graduate courses covered 81 different topics. The primary evaluation techniques include the traditional exams, projects and homework. Details regarding learning objectives and grading schema are provided along with a gap analysis between the coverage of logistics courses and the needs identified by practitioners.

Originality/value

The goal is to use these data as a means of continuous improvement in the quality and value of the educational experience. The findings are designed to foster information sharing and provide data for benchmarking efforts in the development of logistics courses and curricula in academia as well as training and development by professionals in the field of logistics.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Remko van Hoek and David Dobrzykowski

Reshoring is one of the supply chain risk management techniques suggested in literature. However, literature suggests that the decision-making involved in reshoring is…

Abstract

Purpose

Reshoring is one of the supply chain risk management techniques suggested in literature. However, literature suggests that the decision-making involved in reshoring is complex and not fully understood. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, reshoring may represent a way to reduce reliance on global sources and improve resilience of their supply chains. This paper aims to explore if the pandemic is driving reshoring decisions and if the pandemic will actually lead to companies reshoring parts of their supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper critically engages with senior(-most) supply chain managers from three manufacturing companies as they proceed through reshoring decision-making. This enables to develop experiential knowledge about reshoring decision-making processes and their context, as well as insights into the relevance of existing knowledge about reshoring. While not a full multiple case study, the opportunity to engage directly with senior(-most) supply chain managers as they consider reshoring, enables near real-time learning. Not only is reshoring a very timely topic literature has also called for more event-based empirical research. Further to that, it is hoped that this can complement this special issue and support, in a timely manner, the many researchers that are actively studying the impact of the pandemic on supply chains.

Findings

Reshoring was being actively considered by all three companies during the research process in Q3 and Q4 of 2020. During this period the pandemic has not yet led to substantial implementation of reshoring, at least by the companies studied in this paper. In response to tariffs on Chinese imports, companies had been diversifying their supply base away from China, but doing so by developing alternative, global sources. Additionally, companies are using alternative risk management techniques, such as supplier collaboration, in the short to medium term. Reshoring decision-making is indeed found to be complex and requires a longer-term time horizon for decision-making and implementation. Logistical challenges and growth in demand do drive a willingness of consumers to pay a premium for locally sourced products. However, when supply normalizes these considerations might lose relevance well before reshoring decision-making and implementation can be completed.

Originality/value

This paper studies reshoring in a real-world setting, learning directly from insights from industry as they emerge. This paper develops four extensions to existing knowledge, develop these in frameworks and hope that this will support ongoing consideration in industry and support the many researchers that are active in this domain today. This paper also suggests several directions for further research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

1 – 10 of 84