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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2005

James D. Tripp, Peppi M. Kenny and Don T. Johnson

As of 1982, federal credit unions were allowed to add select employee groups and thus create institutions with multiple-group common bonds. We examine the efficiency of…

Abstract

As of 1982, federal credit unions were allowed to add select employee groups and thus create institutions with multiple-group common bonds. We examine the efficiency of single bond and multiple bond federal-chartered credit unions by using data envelopment analysis (DEA), a non-parametric, linear programming methodology. Results indicate that multiple bond credit unions have better pure technical efficiency than single bond credit unions. However, single bond credit unions appear to be more scale efficient than the multiple bond credit unions. Our results also indicate that members of multiple bond credit unions may derive greater wealth gains than members of single bond credit unions.

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Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-161-3

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Thang Ngoc Bach, Hung Ly Dai, Viet Hung Nguyen and Thanh Le

This paper examines the effects of sub-national union coverage on the youth's labor market outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the effects of sub-national union coverage on the youth's labor market outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

In the context of the private business sector in Vietnam, this study link individual labor market data with union coverage at provincial level in the period 2013–2016 to investigate the effects of sub-national union coverage on the youth's labor market outcomes. Contingent on the outcome variable, we use the OLS and probit model that control for diverse individual characteristics, year- and industry-fixed effects, and particularly control for selection bias in the labor market.

Findings

The empirical results show that the union coverage is positively associated with a wide range of the youth's labor market outcomes, including employment status, wage rate, work hour, and job formality. Also, the coverage is complementary to individual labor contract in determining the youth's wage rate.

Originality/value

This study provides an in-depth study on the interplay between trade union and the youth's labor market outcomes that contributes to the literature of labor market institutions and youth employment policies in a dynamic transitional economy of Vietnam.

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Journal of Economics and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1859-0020

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Hisham Said, Aishwarya Mali and Ajay Deshmukh

Construction trade unions have been a vital force in improving the job standards and wellbeing of trade workers. However, the union membership in the construction industry…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction trade unions have been a vital force in improving the job standards and wellbeing of trade workers. However, the union membership in the construction industry has dropped by half between 1983 and 2017. The objective of this study is to identify and assess the controlling factors of construction electrical trade unionization in the United States.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved four main steps. Literature review and industry townhall meetings were conducted to identify the electrical trade unionization factors. A new unionization trend metric was developed using available union market share data to quantify the growth and decline of local unions. Mixed-mode surveying was used to collect questionnaire and interview data on the unionization factors in different local units of the electrical trade union. Finally, the survey data from the questionnaire and interviews were merged and their correlation with the unionization trend data was assessed.

Findings

The study found that the unionization of this specialty trade is dependent on increasing the crew ratio, expanding the non-apprenticeship union membership program, organizing larger contractors, and continuing the union focus on public and heavy industrial projects.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the construction management body of knowledge by providing a data-driven industry-wide assessment of the factors that affect electrical construction unionization. The study advances the understanding of construction trade unions by narrowing the theory-practice knowledge gap, illustrating the use of macro quantitative empirical research methods, and developing a new unionization trend metric.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Antonius Sumarwan, Belinda Luke and Craig Furneaux

This paper aims to explore how accountability to members is practised within credit unions. In particular, this study examines formal and informal practices and underlying…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how accountability to members is practised within credit unions. In particular, this study examines formal and informal practices and underlying approaches regarding accountability to members.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a case study approach, this study explores accountability within two credit unions in the lightly-regulated context of Indonesia through focus group discussions with credit union practitioners and documentary analysis.

Findings

Findings reveal both credit unions prioritised accountability to members for financial and social performance, underpinned by a socialising, relational approach and driven by a strong sense of social mission. Various mechanisms were adopted to directly address accountability to and empowerment of members, facilitating their participation and education. Further, several mechanisms of and approaches to accountability to other stakeholders indirectly enhanced the credit unions’ accountability to members.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the interrelated nature of credit unions’ accountability mechanisms to members. Further, empowerment through participation, education and small business development, suggests valuable investment in members’ social, intellectual and financial capital.

Originality/value

This study examines the socialising nature of accountability to credit union members and other stakeholders to support members’ interests, providing insights into how third sector organisations more broadly might enhance accountability to those the organisation seeks to serve.

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Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Terry E. Ashforth and Geoffrey N. Soutar

Research among credit unions in Western Australia is reported in which directors and managers of credit unions expressed their attitudes with regard to the corporate…

Abstract

Research among credit unions in Western Australia is reported in which directors and managers of credit unions expressed their attitudes with regard to the corporate objectives of their organisation, and future directions of development for the credit union movement are suggested.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

P.B. Beaumont and R.I.D. Harris

As the overall level of union membership and density has fallen in Britain throughout the 1980s (and into the 1990s), researchers have begun to pay more attention to the…

Abstract

As the overall level of union membership and density has fallen in Britain throughout the 1980s (and into the 1990s), researchers have begun to pay more attention to the non‐union employment sector. For instance, considerable use has been made of the second national Workplace Industrial Relations Survey (1984) to investigate the determinants of non‐union status. The major limitation of such work, however, is that it treats the non‐union sector as essentially homogeneous in nature. Such an approach sits rather awkwardly with the following facts and findings:

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Management Research News, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Paul Blyton

“Managerial unionism” commented one writer recently “consititutes an emergent industrial relations phenomenon of major significance”. Long established in the public sector…

Abstract

“Managerial unionism” commented one writer recently “consititutes an emergent industrial relations phenomenon of major significance”. Long established in the public sector the movement of junior and middle managers into trade unions is indeed becoming increasingly evident throughout private industry. Rising job insecurity, dissatisfaction with salary levels and a decline in the individual treatment of managers by employers are some of the factors encouraging this development. New unions have been created and existing ones adapted to meet the demand. There are now more than a dozen unions catering exclusively for managerial and executive grades, as well as the more general white‐collar unions which recruit managers, notably Clive Jenkins' Association of Scientific, Technical and Managerial Staffs.

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Employee Relations, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Examines union and non‐union consultation and representation arrangements at South West Water, UK.

Abstract

Purpose

Examines union and non‐union consultation and representation arrangements at South West Water, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Constitutes a briefing that is prepared by an independent writer who adds his own impartial comments.

Findings

Demonstrates that perceptions of trade union membership change over time and between people. Shows that South West Water has generally diluted trade union influence in recent years. Argues, however, that adopting a strategy of substituting unions at the workplace by individualizing the employment relationship and derecognizing the union may not always produce positive industrial‐relations outcomes.

Practical implications

Highlights that new European Union directives which seek to make sure employees are informed and consulted in employment matters, may mean that a mechanism for communication between management and employees at the workplace may not be enough, and that the right to be heard and have a say over important workplace issues, and at times an acknowledgement of differing interests, may be essential for achieving greater employee satisfaction and commitment.

Originality/value

Contains plenty to interest employer and trade union representatives involved in the ongoing debate over trade union influence.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Rajinder Garcha and John C. Phillips

This study was conducted to learn about the involvement of US academic librarians in local as well as national faculty union activities; their reasons for joining unions;…

Abstract

This study was conducted to learn about the involvement of US academic librarians in local as well as national faculty union activities; their reasons for joining unions; and the benefits they have gained because of their memberships in their unions. It was concluded that librarians who were members of unions generally earned higher salaries than those who were not. Since librarians had on several occasions worked closely with the teaching faculty on various union activities, several close bonds and relationships among them had occurred. Moreover, librarians viewed union membership as a vehicle to become more involved in decision‐making processes at their institutions.

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Library Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Francis Green and Jean Soper

At the start of the 1990s trade unions were reeling from a decade of Thatcherism, in which their density amongst employees had been whittled down to 35% by 1990. Several…

Abstract

At the start of the 1990s trade unions were reeling from a decade of Thatcherism, in which their density amongst employees had been whittled down to 35% by 1990. Several explanations for the decline have vied for attention: the changing composition of industry and of the economy generally, with more part‐time work, fewer large‐scale establishments, the collapse of manufacturing industries and so on; the changing legal environment; the distinctly uncongenial macroeconomic environment, which with lowish inflation and mass unemployment was a discouragement to membership (see for example Disney, 1990; Green, 1991). Such explanations have varying implications for unions' future prospects. For example, if the changed level environment were the key factor, one would predict a further decline of union membership in the 1990s, unless there were a change of government and a wholesale repeal of Thatcherite trade union laws (which is not to be expected). A distinction has been drawn in the literature between the structural factors that determine the social context in which individual employees make their decisions with regard to union membership, and the varying preferences that individuals may have in favour of or against unions. Attempts have been made to show that despite years of attacks from Thatcherism, it is not so much the attitudes and commitment of workers to unions that has changed, as the opportunities that they face. Thus it is said that for many the reason that they left unions is because unions simply were not available at the new workplaces (Gallie, 1989).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 16 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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