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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1977

Tom Kilcourse

Transactional analysis (TA) presents a model of man which has found applications far removed from the psychiatric practice of Dr Eric Berne, its originator. TA theory…

Abstract

Transactional analysis (TA) presents a model of man which has found applications far removed from the psychiatric practice of Dr Eric Berne, its originator. TA theory posits man as a being having three separate, identifiable ego states, namely child, adult and parent. There are two senses in which the term “transactional analysis” is used: as a generic term covering several analytic elements, and as a specific term relating to the analysis of transactions between people. The main analytic elements falling under the generic heading are known as games analysis, transactional analysis in the specific sense, structural analysis and script analysis. This article uses TA generally in its broader sense

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Patreese D. Ingram

Reveals the results of a study which investigated the principal’s leadership behaviour in schools which educate moderately and severely disabled students in regular…

Abstract

Reveals the results of a study which investigated the principal’s leadership behaviour in schools which educate moderately and severely disabled students in regular education classrooms on a full‐time basis. More specifically, notes that the purposes of this study were to determine whether the leadership behaviours of principals, as perceived by teachers, tended to be more transformational or more transactional; and whether there was a difference in the leadership behaviours of principals and the extent to which principals motivated teachers to exert effort beyond the ordinary. Forty‐four teachers from five school districts responded to the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) developed by Bass (1985). The independent variable was leadership behaviours of principals, defined as varying degrees of transformational and transactional leadership. The dependent variable was defined as principals’ ability to affect teacher motivation. Shows that the results of the study indicated that principals were perceived by teachers to exhibit more transformational leadership behaviours than they exhibited transactional leadership behaviours. Also, teachers tended to be more highly motivated under the leadership of principals who they perceived to be more transformational than transactional.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Telli E. van der Lei and Paulien M. Herder

This work is part of a research project that seeks to gain insight into the applicability of different actor analysis methods. This paper aims to describe the analysis of…

Abstract

Purpose

This work is part of a research project that seeks to gain insight into the applicability of different actor analysis methods. This paper aims to describe the analysis of the predictive value of two different actor analysis methods applied to the redesign of the water management of a Dutch polder.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's approach is a parallel application and comparison of the results of two separate actor analysis methods: conflict analysis and transactional analysis.

Findings

Transactional analysis was more accurate regarding the prediction of the real world outcomes than conflict analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The choice of analysis method may be of significant influence on the quality of understanding of the risks involved with different stakeholders. There may not be a single silver bullet.

Practical implications

An asset manager needs to apply multiple actor analysis techniques to fully grasp the impact of the threats posed by the stakeholders on the asset and its risk register.

Originality/value

The parallel application of the two methods and comparison of their predictive value is new.

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Taran Patel

Many managers of Indo‐French alliances consider culture to be a failure, rather than a success factor because they address the national or corporate level for…

Abstract

Purpose

Many managers of Indo‐French alliances consider culture to be a failure, rather than a success factor because they address the national or corporate level for cross‐cultural comparisons. In contrast, this study proposes using the Douglasian Cultural Theory (CT) to address the transactional level of culture. In so doing, it aims to overcome some of the limitations of the national, corporate and transactional approaches and provide a systematic framework for discussing the viability of international alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of 48 ethnographic interviews and field studies was conducted in 25 Indo‐French alliances.

Findings

Through an analysis of the ethnographic interviews and field studies conducted, the paper offers the following guidelines to managers for the design of viable alliances: the commonly‐cited interdependence of the hierarchical and competitive solidarities is not sufficient to ensure the viability of international alliances; the presence of a third solidarity seems essential; an analysis of failed alliances reveals that fatalism is not the third solidarity we are looking for; and an analysis of viable alliances shows that the egalitarian solidarity plays a role in ensuring the viability of international alliances by building a bridge between the hierarchical and competitive solidarity, thereby preventing gridlocks.

Research limitations/implications

Major methodological limitations of this study include over‐emphasis on ethnographic interviews for data and use of unsystematic criteria for identifying solidarities in Indo‐French alliances

Originality/value

Unlike the paper's predecessors, it recommends that cultural plurality, not cultural domination, leads to viable alliances. International managers often tend to impose their own thought styles on others, thereby neglecting the inherent wisdom of other thought styles. The paper stresses that cultural diversity without duality leads to viability.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Hoon Park and J. Kline

A major concern facing multinational corporations in the 1990s ishow to prepare managers to operate effectively within another culture.Unfortunately, many corporations…

Abstract

A major concern facing multinational corporations in the 1990s is how to prepare managers to operate effectively within another culture. Unfortunately, many corporations seldom provide cross‐cultural management training because it is considered unnecessary or ineffective by top management. Given such corporate mentality, a major concern facing trainers is how to develop cultural awareness and improve cultural sensitivity. Introduces a new approach for enhancing the efficacy of cross‐cultural training by extending one of the most effective psychotherapeutic counselling methods – transactional analysis – over the cross‐cultural setting. Presents conceptual framework which suggests that a crucial element of cross‐cultural training for managers must be to help them achieve an “adult ego state”, and thus ensure that they maintain the most effective cross‐cultural position – my culture′s OK, your culture′s OK. By using transactional analysis as a prerequisite to other approaches in cross‐cultural training, trainers can provide a more comprehensive programme which will not only enhance sensitivity and awareness, but ultimately lead to a greater usage of and appreciation for cross‐cultural training by organizations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Stuart Hannabuss

The process of Transactional Analysis is reviewed and the uses of its techniques demonstrated. A training exercise illustrating the three ego states in transactions is included.

Abstract

The process of Transactional Analysis is reviewed and the uses of its techniques demonstrated. A training exercise illustrating the three ego states in transactions is included.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Joyce Chapman and David Woodbury

The purpose of this paper is to encourage administrators of device‐lending programs to leverage existing quantitative data for management purposes by integrating analysis

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage administrators of device‐lending programs to leverage existing quantitative data for management purposes by integrating analysis of quantitative data into the day‐to‐day workflow.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study of NCSU Libraries' efforts to analyze and visualize transactional data to aid in the on‐going management of a device‐lending program.

Findings

Analysis and visualization of qualitative data related to technology lending revealed patterns in lending over the course of the semester, day, and week that had previously gone unrecognized. With more concrete data about trends in wait times, capacity lending, and circulation volume, staff are now able to make more informed purchasing decisions, modify systems and workflows to better meet user needs, and begin to explore new ideas for services and staffing models.

Practical implications

The concepts and processes described here can be replicated by other libraries that wish to leverage transactional data analysis and data visualization to aid in management of a device‐lending program.

Originality/value

Although much literature exists on the implementation and qualitative evaluation of device‐lending programs, this paper is the first to provide librarians with ideas for leveraging analysis of transactional data to improve management of a device‐lending program.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1978

D WRIGHT

‘We have a problem with communications’ is probably the most common phrase that trainers come across in their needs analysis process. Consequently a vast amount of…

Abstract

‘We have a problem with communications’ is probably the most common phrase that trainers come across in their needs analysis process. Consequently a vast amount of training effort is expended in the area of improving people's skills in how to communicate. What is neglected on the majority of courses is why people say and do things and especially why they react to a communication stimulus in a particular way. By analysing oneself it is possible to appreciate why some communication problems arise and Transactional Analysis by providing the framework for such an analysis is an important training tool in the search for improved communications.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2012

Bjørn E. Asbjørnslett, Haakon Lindstad and Jan Tore Pedersen

A trend in modern supply chain management has been to substitute information for inventory. In this chapter, an approach to how information and communication technology…

Abstract

A trend in modern supply chain management has been to substitute information for inventory. In this chapter, an approach to how information and communication technology can be used to achieve this in a maritime logistics context is outlined and described based upon a bulk shipping case.

The approach used is based on data-driven modeling and analysis, in which current logistics and commodity storage costs are benchmarked against a “best possible solution.”

To make a new solution operative, a change should be made based upon an analytical decision-making approach, ICT infrastructure development, and inter-organizational development. Thus, the proper use of analytical and transactional information and communication technology in maritime logistics would enable logistics chain stakeholders to track stock levels and ultimately allocate vessels to move cargo when that is logistically most cost effective. Further, this could support a development in the contractual relationships between producer and shipping line changing from a Contract of Affreightment to a Service Level Agreement relationship.

There is room for enhanced use of information and communication technology to provide decision and operational support at strategic, tactical, and operational levels within maritime logistics. This chapter explains some of the driving forces for this, together with a tested approach and method for this, given into a specific, practical case.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

KEN NIXON

The first article on the subject, which appeared in the August issue of Industrial and Commercial Training, described the development of a training course in BEA for…

Abstract

The first article on the subject, which appeared in the August issue of Industrial and Commercial Training, described the development of a training course in BEA for Passenger Services Staff. The aim of this training is to improve personal service. Its most important element is role‐playing of typical interactions between staff and passengers; these are recorded on video‐tape and replayed for viewing and discussion. A good deal of reading, thinking and research was done before and during the training development. Visits were made to the training centres of several airlines, in Britain and the USA; research workers in both countries were also consulted. Five relevant views of the subject will be examined. These are: • the concept of social skill — Michael Argyle • the analysis of verbal behaviours — Neil Rackham • T‐group training — particularly the research by Cary Cooper and Henry Odie for the Hotel and Catering ITB • transactional analysis — work in Pan American Airways and American Airlines • applied learning in management training — by Mel Sorcher and Arnold Goldstein of Syracuse, USA A reading list giving references to these ideas and authors is given at the end of the article. The intention here is briefly to describe these views, evaluate their relevance to Customer Service Training generally, and show how they have influenced the philosophy and the design of the BEA training. Naturally, more weight will be given to one view than to another in the analysis that follows, but it should be emphasised that there is no intention to choose nor to reject any particular theory or training development. The different approaches are often complementary, each provides insight into the problems of human interaction.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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