Search results

1 – 10 of over 13000
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Seyed-Hadi Mirghaderi

This paper aims to develop a simple model for estimating sustainable development goals index using the capabilities of artificial neural networks.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a simple model for estimating sustainable development goals index using the capabilities of artificial neural networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Sustainable development has three pillars, including social, economic and environmental pillars. Three clusters corresponding to the three pillars were created by extracting sub-indices of three 2018 global reports and performing cluster analysis on the correlation matrix of sub-indices. By setting the sustainable development goals index as the target variable and selecting one indicator from each cluster as input variables, 20 artificial neural networks were run 30 times.

Findings

Artificial neural networks with seven nodes in one hidden layer can estimate sustainable development goals index by using just three inputs, including ecosystem vitality, human capital and gross national income per capita. There is an excellent similarity (>95%) between the results of the artificial neural network and the sustainable development goals index.

Practical implications

Instead of calculating 232 indicators for determining the value of sustainable development goals index, it is possible to use only three sub-indices, but missing 5% of precision, by using the proposed artificial neural network model.

Originality/value

The study provides additional information on the estimating of sustainable development and proposes a new simple method for estimating the sustainable development goals index. It just uses three sub-indices, which can be retrieved from three global reports.

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Kathryn H. Au and Taffy E. Raphael

Purpose – This chapter discusses the application of the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) to school change and the learning of groups of leaders, teachers, and…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter discusses the application of the Gradual Release of Responsibility (GRR) to school change and the learning of groups of leaders, teachers, and students. Specifically, the authors describe the Seven Levels to Success, a model for school change that supports teachers in building their school’s own staircase (coherent) curriculum in literacy. The authors discuss the effectiveness of this model for capacity building – giving schools a “deep bench” of leaders and teachers who can sustain improved student achievement over a period of years.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The theoretical underpinning of this research is provided by the Vygotsky Space, a construct that shows how learning may be understood in terms of the intersections of collective and individual actions, and public and private settings. This construct allows us to understand what drives a school’s advancement through the Seven Levels and how that advancement can be restarted after it has been slowed or interrupted. The authors report findings about school change from 20 years of work in 264 elementary and secondary schools, reflecting a wide range of students and communities across the United States.

Findings – While schools’ typical advancement in the Seven-Level model is neither steady nor linear, it adheres to an overall pattern: Leaders must take ownership first, followed by teachers and then students. To build their school’s staircase curriculum, teachers must see themselves as creators rather than consumers of curriculum. Teachers who see themselves as creators take ownership of their curriculum. Their deep understanding of the curriculum promotes continuous improvements and related success in improving their students’ literacy learning. Four case examples illustrate change in a variety of school settings, providing existence proofs of how the Seven-Level model functions to improve students’ literacy learning.

Research Limitations/Implications – The authors highlight the importance of the school as the unit of analysis in change efforts, and of understanding a school’s progress over time. The authors emphasize considering the role of multiple constituencies, beginning with school leaders and encompassing teachers, students, and families. One implication of this study is that more attention should be paid to the role of school leaders – administrators, curriculum coordinators, and teacher leaders – in setting the stage for sustainable improvement.

Practical Implications – The authors provide guidance to practitioners working on school change within the framework of the Seven Levels to Success and other social constructivist models. Specifically, the authors give examples of relevant actions external consultants and school leaders take at critical junctures in a school’s progress.

Originality/Value of Paper – This chapter breaks new ground in applying the GRR model and the Vygotsky Space to the area of school change in literacy. Summarizing 20 years of work with the Seven-Level model demonstrates potential of teacher-developed curricula for the sustainable improvement of students’ literacy learning.

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Gary Getz and Joe Lee

A key cause for missing strategy goals is that leaders do not invest the same amount of time, energy, and resources in managing the implementation of the strategy as they…

4442

Abstract

Purpose

A key cause for missing strategy goals is that leaders do not invest the same amount of time, energy, and resources in managing the implementation of the strategy as they do in setting the strategy. They also do not realize that managing strategy execution requires well orchestrated management processes – letting existing business processes run the course will not drive the transformation required. So, in order for companies and business units to reach the audacious ambitions stated in their strategies, they must thoughtfully manage the way the strategy is implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

Our experience transforming Global 1000 companies for over 20 years has shown the “Three pillars of effective strategy execution” methodology to be powerful yet flexible in helping companies to deliver on strategy execution.

Findings

The three pillar approach addresses the direction, structure, and people required to be effective in strategy implementation over the planning horizon. It keeps companies from falling into the trap of emphasizing only one pillar or sub‐element (e.g. structural re‐organization, detailed interpretation of the strategy content, or employee communications) while neglecting others, and allows for ongoing adaptation and re‐balancing of the three pillars as they learn.

Practical implications

Managers should develop implementation plans that specifically address the following issues to execute their strategy effectively: direction – getting specific with strategy to the point where it is relevant for everyone and everything in the company; structure – creating an organizational architecture that shadows the strategic architecture; people – engaging and mobilizing employees for sustained commitment.

Originality/value

Managers must manage their progress on the three pillars in a coordinated way, ensuring that no one element gets too far ahead of the others. Many companies have failed by letting re‐organization get out in front of cascading the content of the strategy, for instance. Balance is a great virtue in implementing the threepillar model.

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Shang Gao, Sui Pheng Low and Serene Simin Ng

Sluggish performance in construction productivity (CP) is a common occurrence worldwide. This phenomenon is also observed in Singapore. In this context, the role of trade…

Abstract

Purpose

Sluggish performance in construction productivity (CP) is a common occurrence worldwide. This phenomenon is also observed in Singapore. In this context, the role of trade unions (TUs) has also been mentioned but appears to be little understood. Hence, this study evaluates the role of TUs in contributing to CP. The key issue is to determine whether TUs have a role to play in contemporary society in improving CP.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes on multiple research methodologies; more specifically, the mixed-method of survey questionnaires and interviews is used. Firstly, a survey questionnaire was employed to obtain broad viewpoints on the general understanding of the target groups towards the CP issues in Singapore. The survey questionnaire also attempts to study the TUs in greater depth by examining their existing strategies of and hindrances to improving CP. Once findings were gathered from the survey questionnaire, the interviews were carried out to probe deeper into the phenomena in the results.

Findings

The research findings showed there is a generally positive outlook that TUs have the ability to contribute to CP. The study finds that the TU respondents possess strong attributes within the normative pillar, but weak attributes in the regulative and cultural–cognitive pillars.

Originality/value

This study uses the Institutional Theory as a general framework, which identifies a union's functions and activities in three pillars that underpin the institutional theory and defines its impact on construction productivity.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Theingi Theingi, Hla Theingi and Sharon Purchase

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how institutional mechanisms operate within both formal and informal channels of cross-border remittance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how institutional mechanisms operate within both formal and informal channels of cross-border remittance.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face interviews were conducted with Myanmar migrants mostly working in Thailand. Thematic coding was used to analyze field notes and identify themes in channel member perceptions and institutional environmental process.

Findings

Informal money transfer channels have achieved higher levels of legitimacy when compared to formal channels. Channel legitimacy is a more important attribute than efficiency. Lack of financial infrastructure, such as bank branches and ATM machines particularly in rural or outlying areas of Myanmar, the requirements for formal documentation and language and communication are the major institutional constraints that encourage the development and use of multiple channels in Myanmar. Formal money transfer channels develop with stronger regulative institutional processes, whereas informal money transfer channels develop with stronger cultural-cognitive and normative institutional processes.

Research limitations/implications

Using convenience sample of remitters mainly from one area of Thailand and other channel members from Yangon, the financial capital of Myanmar, may limit the applicability of the findings, which calls for future research.

Practical implications

Banks and money transfer offices need to improve legitimacy perception within migrant communities by building stronger networks with local banks and international banks. They could provide Myanmar speaking front-line service personnel and include brochures in the Myanmar language to improve the communication process. The findings and recommendations from this study are also applicable to informal channels and formal financial institutions in other ASEAN countries that are preparing to make investments in Myanmar. Moreover, Myanmar banks should also consider opening branches to cater for Myanmar workers in ASEAN, especially in Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia.

Originality value

This paper applies institutional theory within channels, investigates the context of a financial channel rather than a product channel, addresses the importance of institutional environmental mechanisms and constraints in influencing channel behavior and is embedded in the situational context of Myanmar, a newly opened South-East Asian economy where little prior research has been conducted.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Anika Meyer and Ina Fourie

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of utilising a holistic ergonomic approach, covering engineering, cognitive and social perspectives, to cultivate…

1072

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the value of utilising a holistic ergonomic approach, covering engineering, cognitive and social perspectives, to cultivate beneficial and productive collaborative information seeking (CIS) systems and environments, specifically with regard to three main CIS pillars (control, communication and awareness).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach, based on a selective corpus of CIS literature, was utilised to perform a content analysis to note if terms and concepts normally associated with engineering, cognitive and social ergonomics can be used to eliminate terms reflecting issues related to three CIS pillars (control, communication and awareness) that can benefit from a holistic ergonomic approach.

Findings

The content analysis revealed that a fairly extensive amount of holistic ergonomic terminology is prominent within the CIS literature, therefore establishing a connection between the two disciplines: CIS and ergonomics. This suggests that CIS system issues could benefit from the insights of a holistic ergonomic approach.

Research limitations/implications

Since this is an exploratory study the scope of CIS literature utilised in the content analysis was limited to a selection considered most important by the authors; this should be supplemented by further research.

Practical implications

Intended to instigate interest in further exploration of the beneficial and productive implications and practical application of holistic ergonomics in designing CIS systems and environments.

Originality/value

This is the first research paper in the Library and Information Science literature that explores the potential of utilising holistic ergonomics to cultivate CIS systems and environments.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Pornanong Budsaratragoon and Boonlert Jitmaneeroj

The purpose of this study is to investigate the causal interrelations among the four pillars of corporate sustainability, which indicate a firm’s contribution to…

2290

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the causal interrelations among the four pillars of corporate sustainability, which indicate a firm’s contribution to environmental, social, governance and economic activities. Moreover, this study identifies the critical drivers of corporate sustainability by focusing on the levels of market developments and geographical regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on corporate sustainability data of 2,725 global companies in 2016, this study uses a combination of analytical techniques including cluster analysis, data mining, partial least square path modeling and importance performance map analysis.

Findings

This study finds that companies in European developed markets exhibit the highest-ranking of corporate sustainability. In line with the social impact hypothesis, environmental, social and governance performance positively affects economic performance. Moreover, there is strong evidence of causal relationships and synergistic effects among the four pillars of corporate sustainability. In accordance with the institutional theory, the patterns of causal directions and the critical pillars depend on levels of market developments and geographical regions. Overall, social and environmental pillars are among the most critical drivers of corporate sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology does not aim to provide a new weighting scheme for calculating the corporate sustainability index.

Practical implications

Corporate managers should consider sustainability practices in all dimensions to benefit from synergistic effects among environmental, social, governance and economic activities. Furthermore, corporate sustainability strategies should not be generalized across countries with different levels of market developments and geographical regions.

Originality/value

This study prioritizes environmental, social, governance and economic pillars of corporate sustainability in emerging and developed markets across geographical regions.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Gabriela Pereira Soares, Guilherme Tortorella, Marina Bouzon and Madjid Tavana

This study aims to propose a method for measuring lean supply chain management (LSCM) maturity based on the main lean practices and existing waste of a supply chain.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a method for measuring lean supply chain management (LSCM) maturity based on the main lean practices and existing waste of a supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage approach was developed. First, a thorough literature review was performed to raise concepts and previous findings on maturity models (MMs) and LSCM. This review’s outcomes were then validated by experts in the field using the fuzzy Delphi method (FDM). Subsequently, the proposed model was illustrated and assessed based on a multi-case study.

Findings

All companies attained high outcomes in the elimination of the waste pillar. The pillars of logistics management, continuous improvement and information technology management also stood out in the three organizations’ results. The company with the lowest maturity level operates in a make-to-order production policy, which may harm the lean supply in its supply chain.

Practical implications

The proposed model can reveal external opportunities and threats and internal strengths and weaknesses in supply chains (SCs). It is also capable of providing a clear roadmap for SC improvement in companies.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study to date has proposed a MM in the LSCM context using FDM and considering the crucial relationship between lean practices and wastes.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Sanjay Bhattacharya and K.S. Momaya

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) holds the potential to improve capabilities- and technology-based innovation, which will enable breakout for architectural…

Abstract

Purpose

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) holds the potential to improve capabilities- and technology-based innovation, which will enable breakout for architectural, engineering, construction and operation and maintenance (AECO) companies, for international competitiveness. Though the top management of such companies is convinced on the utility of the applications, they are unsure on the strategy of implementing the same. The objective of this research is to suggest a strategy framework for digital transformation of the AECO value chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The nascent level of research on 4IR in construction necessitated the adoption of the integrative review methodology for the study. Extensive literature review of research on strategy and 4IR has been utilized to establish the validity of the first two pillars, namely “a strategy of simple rules in a complex environment; and deployment of dynamic capabilities.” The validation of a construct for the third pillar of “confluence of change and continuity forces” has been achieved via hypothesis testing of data obtained through a questionnaire survey.

Findings

The present study has integrated three diverse ideas of strategy, named as the pillars, to facilitate sustainable digital transformation. Within the third pillar, top three continuity forces which offer resistance to change are organization culture, existing delivery processes and networks, and existing standard operating procedures. On the other hand, the leading drivers of change are needs of competitiveness; global industry trends and the advent of new technologies/innovations.

Research limitations/implications

This provides a practical approach to operationalize digital transformation of the AECO at an organization level. The validation relied on opinion and perspectives of a sample frame in the Indian context, which was its limitation.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a strategy framework of three pillars to help address specific strategy dilemmas during implementation of digital transformation of particular organizations in AECO. The study contributes to both theory and practice by helping leaders of AECO companies, associations, policymakers and the academia to strategize transformations successfully.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Ubaid Illahi and Mohammad Shafi Mir

The purpose of this paper is to quantify and evaluate transport sustainability from an integrated perspective. It is argued that transportation systems being…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to quantify and evaluate transport sustainability from an integrated perspective. It is argued that transportation systems being interdisciplinary and complex, the integrated approach towards quantification and evaluation would present its sustainability goals’ attainment in a much better way.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed integrated methodology is divided into five major steps that are sub-divided. It adopts a three-tier classification system i.e. pillar, sub-division and indicator. In total, 116 sustainable transportation indicators (STIs) were classified into 10 subdivisions corresponding to three sustainability pillars. The weighting and aggregation of STIs were done using a combination of a statistical tool called principal component analysis/factor analysis, a machine learning tool called fuzzy logic and equal weighting method. The final output that the proposed integrated methodology generates is a new composite index called the integrated sustainable transportation index (IIST).

Findings

To check the credibility of the proposed integrated methodology, it was applied to 26 states and the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. Based on the computed IIST, 27 study zones were ranked and mapped. The results showed that while Tamil Nadu (0.643), Telangana (0.574) and Maharashtra (0.564) were the best-performing states, Goa (0.347), Chhattisgarh (0.436) and Meghalaya (0.439) were the worst-performing states, as far as the relative transportation sustainability is concerned.

Practical implications

The proposed integrated methodology could be useful for transportation evaluators, planners and policymakers who can recognize, track and improve the strengths and overcome the weaknesses within a transportation system.

Originality/value

The novelty of this research work is that it uses a multi-stage multi-tool approach to quantify and evaluate transport sustainability that minimizes the demerits of single-stage individual tools while maximizing their merits.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 13000