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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

Kaat De Pourcq, Katrien Verleye, Bart Larivière, Jeroen Trybou and Paul Gemmel

Focal service providers increasingly involve customers in the decision-making about outsourcing parts of the service delivery process to third parties. The present study…

Abstract

Purpose

Focal service providers increasingly involve customers in the decision-making about outsourcing parts of the service delivery process to third parties. The present study investigates how customers' outsourcing decisions affect the formation of the waiting experience with the focal service provider, by which the objective waiting time, environmental quality and interactional quality act as focal drivers.

Design/methodology/approach

To test our hypotheses in the context of cancer care, we gathered process data and experience data by means of a patient observation template (n = 640) and a patient survey (n = 487). The combined data (n = 377) were analyzed using Bayesian models.

Findings

This study shows that opting for a service triad (i.e. outsourcing non-core services to a third party) deduces customers' attention away from the objective waiting time with the focal service provider but not from the environmental and interactional quality offered by the focal service provider. When the type of service triad coordination is considered, we observe similar effects for a focal service provider-coordinated service triad while in a customer-coordinated service triad the interactional quality is the sole experience driver of waiting experiences that remains significant.

Originality/value

By investigating the implications of customer participation in the decision-making about outsourcing parts of the service delivery process to third parties, this research contributes to the service design, service triad and service operations literature. Specifically, this study shows that customer outsourcing decisions impact waiting experience formation with the focal service provider.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Liliane Abboud, Nabila As'ad, Nicola Bilstein, Annelies Costers, Bieke Henkens and Katrien Verleye

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types…

Abstract

Purpose

Dyadic interactions between customers and service providers rarely occur in isolation. Still, there is a lack of systematic knowledge about the roles that different types of nontechnological third parties – that is, other customers, pets, other employees and other firms – can adopt in relation to customers and service providers during encounters. The present study aims to unravel these roles and highlight their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties.

Design/methodology/approach

This research relies on a systematic review of literature in the Web of Science using a search string pertaining to the research study’s objectives. In total, 2,726 articles were screened by title and abstract using clear inclusion and exclusion criteria, thereby extracting 189 articles for full-text eligibility. The final sample consisted of 139 articles for coding and analysis.

Findings

The analyses reveal that other customers, pets, other employees and other firms can adopt five roles: bystander, connector, endorser, balancer and partner. Each role has different implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties. Additionally, the five roles are associated with distinct constellations of the customer, the service provider and the third party. These roles and constellations are dynamic and not mutually exclusive.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the service encounter literature by providing a thorough understanding of the various third-party roles and their implications for customers, service providers and/or third parties during encounters. As such, this research sheds light on the conditions under which third parties become “significant others” in service encounters and identifies avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Robert C. Lieb, Robert A. Millen and Luk N. Van Wassenhove

Provides a comparison of third‐party logistics services utilizationbetween large manufacturing firms in the USA and Western Europe. Allthese firms had been utilizing…

Abstract

Provides a comparison of third‐party logistics services utilization between large manufacturing firms in the USA and Western Europe. All these firms had been utilizing third‐party providers for at least three years, although many had been doing so for five years or longer. The group of Western European firms is more committed to outsourcing, as evidenced by the substantially greater percentage of their total corporate logistics budget allocated to third‐party firms. The strategic decision to utilize third‐party companies is more often made at the corporate level and includes input more frequently from other functional areas in Western European firms. However, many of the findings indicate that the issues faced by both groups of executives are very similar, such as their reservations to outsourcing and their experiences with implementation. Almost all the executives indicated that they are satisfied with the performance of third‐party providers, and would, at least moderately, increase their use of such firms.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

B.S. Sahay and Ramneesh Mohan

To carry out a comprehensive survey on 3PL practices in India and to establish the impact of usage of third party logistics services on business results.

Abstract

Purpose

To carry out a comprehensive survey on 3PL practices in India and to establish the impact of usage of third party logistics services on business results.

Design/methodology/approach

Begins by analysing the studies carried out on 3PL practices and establishing a research framework. The input variables to the research framework depict the organization‐specific characteristics, such as the extent of usage of 3PL services, the reasons for outsourcing and the impact of the usage of 3PL services. The output function of future usage of 3PL services is influenced by the three input variables. Data collected through survey questionnaire on the input and output variables are used to establish impact of usage of 3PL services on business performance through statistical analysis.

Findings

The usage of 3PL services reveals positive and significant impact on business performance though 3PL practices are still at a nascent stage in India. Additionally, results clearly indicate that significant increase in outsourcing has been planned across all activities of the logistics function in the next 2‐5 years.

Research limitations/implications

Further research work should focus on managing 3PL relationships; selection and contract management of 3PL service providers for building collaborative supply chain partnerships; and identifying critical success factors for 3PL implementation and establishing performance measures for long‐term 3PL relationships.

Practical implications

Detailed study to motivate supply chain managers to outsource and use 3PL services to focus on the core business, drive logistics cost reduction, and improve supply chain efficiency. These indicators should also help the 3PL service providers plan the depth and scope of their service offerings to user organizations in India.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the current 3PL and supply chain practices and the emerging trends in 3PL services for achieving improved business results and supply chain efficiencies.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

A. Michael Knemeyer and Paul R. Murphy

This paper provides a comparison of users and providers of third‐party logistics (3PL) services with respect to relationship marketing elements, such as trust and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides a comparison of users and providers of third‐party logistics (3PL) services with respect to relationship marketing elements, such as trust and communication, as well as relationship marketing outcomes, such as retention and recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

Constructs for the relationship marketing elements and outcomes were derived from the extant literature and modified to reflect the nature of 3PL arrangements. The relevant data were collected from separate, but consistent, mail surveys that were sent to users of 3PL services as well as providers of 3PL services.

Findings

The results indicate statistically significant differences between 3PL users and providers across eight of nine relationship marketing elements, with the lone non‐significant comparison involving the communication construct. There are also statistically significant differences between 3PL users and providers for each of the four relationship marketing outcomes.

Research limitations

Although the present study utilized previously validated relationship marketing elements and outcomes, future research could examine other relationship marketing elements and outcomes. Future research could also investigate relationship marketing issues through dyads/matched pairs of 3PL users and providers.

Originality/value

This manuscript examines 3PL with respect to theories and/or frameworks that comes from outside the logistics discipline, an approach advocated by Stock. Moreover, the paper adds to Moore's 3PL/relationship marketing research by investigating relationship elements and outcomes. The current paper adds to the rather limited literature that incorporates both 3PL user and provider perspectives.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Anu H. Bask

Outsourcing of logistics services has increased rapidly during the last few years. Accordingly, third‐party logistics and supply chain management as a research phenomenon…

Abstract

Outsourcing of logistics services has increased rapidly during the last few years. Accordingly, third‐party logistics and supply chain management as a research phenomenon has gained increased attention from academia. However, a strategic view focusing on the relationship between supply chain management and third‐party logistics service strategies has gained little attention. This paper focuses on alternative supply chain strategies and their relationship to different types of third‐party logistics services. A normative framework for organizing these relationships is developed. The strategic view adopted in this paper fills a gap in the understanding of how third‐party logistics providers should offer their services more effectively and efficiently to different types of supply chains.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

P.C. Jha, Remica Aggarwal and Surya Prakash Singh

The purpose of this research is to first explore various third party logistic service provider supply chain enablers. Thereafter the interrelationship amongst the various…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to first explore various third party logistic service provider supply chain enablers. Thereafter the interrelationship amongst the various supply chain enablers has been studied using ISM Methodology. Despite the complex relationships third party logistic service providers (3PLs) share with their clients or firms, they often attract a demand owing to the flexibility and competitive edge they provide to their client firms in adapting to the rapidly changing market conditions, focusing on their core competencies and developing long-term growth strategies for them. Choosing and evaluating the right third-party logistic service provider is an important responsibility for logistic managers. This largely depends on selecting appropriate 3PLs supply chain enablers that assess the 3PLs on different fronts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an ISM approach for studying the interrelationships between various 3PLs enablers and accordingly constructing a hierarchical structure of them.

Findings

The results suggest that delivery, service reliability and risk and uncertainty factors have the highest importance.

Research limitations/implications

Selection of the 3PLs is a critical issue when they are required to be selected by the company at the global level. This often requires doing a comparative study for both domestic as well as global service providers. Choosing appropriate supply chain enablers as the basis for selection of 3PLs therefore will serve as a research topic to be further explored both by researchers as well as company managers. Further studying the inter-relationships amongst various supply chain enablers will provide basis to managers to justify their choice.

Originality/value

The novelty of the research lies in the application of methodology to the case of third-party logistic service provider selection

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Yangyan Shi, Tiru Arthanari and Lincoln Wood

This paper aims to examine the opportunity for third-party logistics providers (3PLs) to develop further value-added services for their clients, focused on purchasing. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the opportunity for third-party logistics providers (3PLs) to develop further value-added services for their clients, focused on purchasing. The provider perspectives on third-party purchase (3PP) services are examined in conjunction with their business environment, with a survey informed by transaction cost economics.

Design/methodology/approach

New Zealand 3PL providers were surveyed, and 166 responses were received. Structural equation modeling was used to test the conceptual model.

Findings

From the perspective of 3PL providers, uncertainty, frequency and transaction size, but not asset specificity, are significantly associated with client value from a 3PP service. While asset specificity in investments is not required by 3PLs, they need a high frequency of orders, sufficient order size and low levels of uncertainty as supporting conditions for the development of 3PP services.

Research limitations/implications

The sample focuses on 3PL providers and therefore does not address the behavioral characteristics of users or customers of the services.

Originality/value

This study shows that 3PP services may be further developed by 3PL providers to improve the value offered to their clients.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Pat McAllister

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main…

Abstract

Purpose

Focussing on the UK’s institutional real estate universe, this paper analyses variations in the operational management of real estate investment portfolios. For the main categories of institutional investors, the key tasks in real estate operational management, and the ways in which these tasks are typically bundled and categorised by investment managers are reviewed. Three broad operational management models are outlined. Case studies of real estate operational management models in practice are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach is primarily descriptive, drawing upon illustrative investor case studies.

Findings

A range of operating models are identified for managing real estate investment portfolios. Specialists real estate investors tend to have highly vertically integrated operating models viewing most operational management functions as core operational capabilities. Multi-asset owners tend to have a vertically disintegrated operating model outsourcing fund, asset, property and facilities management. Investing institutions such as fund houses and specialist real estate investment advisors seem to have converged upon a common hybrid operating model with high margin, analytical functions such as fund and asset management being insourced and low margin, routine functions such as property and facilities management being outsourced.

Originality/value

Despite the size of the global, institutional real estate investment universe (estimated by DTZ to be worth more than USD 13.6 trillion in 2015), the topic of how (and how effectively) these assets are managed by institutional investors has attracted very little attention from the real estate research community. This paper provides some initial analysis and insights into operational management models for real estate investment portfolios in the contemporary real estate investment management landscape.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Jay Sankaran, David Mun and Zane Charman

Reports an inductive, qualitative investigation into third party logistics contracts in New Zealand. The objective of the study was to uncover managerial insights into…

Abstract

Reports an inductive, qualitative investigation into third party logistics contracts in New Zealand. The objective of the study was to uncover managerial insights into effective logistics outsourcing that are appropriate to the New Zealand context. A salient feature of the research is the methodology that involved going back‐and‐forth between data gathering (the principal source of data was flexible interviews) and analysis, which was conducted through formal coding techniques. Analysis reveals that the third party provider’s refraining from premature monetary commitments is an instrumental variable in the effectiveness of third party logistics contracts in New Zealand. Also uncovers how the uniqueness of the NZ context shapes third party logistics in NZ.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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