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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Cláudia de Freitas

This paper addresses access to formal health care among Cape Verdean immigrants in the Netherlands, and their transnational health‐seeking process in other European…

Abstract

This paper addresses access to formal health care among Cape Verdean immigrants in the Netherlands, and their transnational health‐seeking process in other European countries. Three barriers hindering Cape Verdeans' access to care have been identified: lack of information about the health services available, problems in the relationship with health providers and difficulties in dealing with the conditionality of help. These problems are deeply intertwined, and relate to two sets of factors. At the macro‐level these include the organisational and structural characteristics of the Dutch health care system. At the micro‐level, the problems concern the mismatch between users' and providers' expectations of health care provision.Despite the barriers encountered, Cape Verdeans strive to benefit from good health. The informants in this study employ two sorts of strategy to access good health care. On the one hand, they try to adapt their help‐seeking behaviour to the model prevalent in the Netherlands. On the other, they resort to transnational health care use in other European countries, including Portugal and France. These strategies prove Cape Verdeans' resilience in finding the care that is most appropriate to their needs.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Joost Willem Backer

This paper aims to provide a qualitative country case study of The Netherlands, adopting the macro-institutional social enterprise (MISE) framework as developed by Kerlin…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a qualitative country case study of The Netherlands, adopting the macro-institutional social enterprise (MISE) framework as developed by Kerlin (2009, 2013, 2017). The research question is twofold: How does the institutional context shape the social enterprise country model in The Netherlands, and To what extent can the MISE framework be a useful tool in explaining this dynamic between the institutional context and social enterprise country model?

Design/methodology/approach

This research applies the MISE framework developed by Kerlin (2017), which is founded upon the historical institutionalist approach.

Findings

The analysis of the institutional context in The Netherlands shows that the country context shares most traits with the autonomous diverse model. Its institutional environment should however be more enabling for the development of social enterprises. This discrepancy is explained through the notion of political will, resulting in the suggestion that the historical institutionalist approach of the MISE framework could be expanded by a greater focus on political will.

Research limitations/implications

To investigate the Dutch social enterprise country model, this paper principally relies on external sources, including surveys (McKinsey, 2016; PwC, 2016; Social Enterprise NL, 2015; 2016; 2018). This is problematic due to its subjective nature, small population size used and potential conceptual misfit with the definitions used in this research.

Practical implications

For academia, this paper enhances the understanding of the relations between the institutional environment and social enterprise by adding a case study of The Netherlands to the body of research around the MISE framework. Furthermore, the paper suggests to enhance the historical institutionalist approach of the MISE framework with a greater focus on political will. For advocates of social enterprises in The Netherlands, including policymakers, this paper may add to their understanding of the current developments around social enterprise in The Netherlands and possibly enhance their effectiveness of advocating for policies that are conducive to the development of social enterprises.

Originality/value

This research is the first in applying a universally applicable theoretical framework to the context of The Netherlands. For scholars of social enterprise in The Netherlands, it provides a comprehensive overview of developments of social enterprise in the country over recent years, as well as a thorough analysis of the current state of affairs. For international scholars of social enterprise, this research provides a case of comparison with other countries, taking into account all main institutions that shape a country and social enterprise in that country. For scholars of the MISE framework, this research offers an additional country case study that further helps improve the framework.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Hsin‐I Hsiao, Ron G.M. Kemp, Jack G.A.J. van der Vorst and S.W.F. (Onno) Omta

This paper aims to investigate outsourcing of different types of logistics activities in Taiwanese food industry, and benchmark with practices in The Netherlands.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate outsourcing of different types of logistics activities in Taiwanese food industry, and benchmark with practices in The Netherlands.

Design/methodology/approach

The outsourcing of four levels of logistics activities is investigated: transportation (level 1), packaging (level 2), transportation management (level 3), and distribution network management (level 4). A structured questionnaire was designed and sent to logistics managers in The Netherlands and Taiwan to evaluate the most commonly outsourced activities and identify specific outsourcing firm's characteristics.

Findings

About 69 per cent of the companies, in both countries outsource level 1 activities, 16 per cent level 2, and 37 per cent level 3 activities. Only few companies (about 10 per cent) outsource the highest level of activities. In particular, The Netherlands has higher percentages for levels 1 and 3. This might be caused by the fact that most Taiwanese companies emphasise low cost whereas the Dutch companies focus on flexibility in order to deal with higher complexities. When intentions for the future are included, Taiwan is planning to outsource level 2 (40 per cent) and level 4 activities (36 per cent) much more than The Netherlands (respectively 13 and 17 per cent). When zooming in, it was found that outsourcing strategies of companies in the subsectors differ. For instance, the dairy sector outsources more frequently than the meat sector on the first three levels. This might be caused by the fact that meat companies emphasise food quality, whereas dairy companies emphasise flexibility and reliability.

Research limitations/implications

This study investigated only food processors. The paper suggests further research should include other types of food organisations.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable insights in outsourcing strategies of food processing companies in Taiwan and The Netherlands for advanced logistics service providers who are looking at the market potential of Taiwan.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Warwick Funnell and Jeffrey Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to examine sixteenth century Netherlands business organisation and accounting practices, then the most advanced in Western Europe, to test…

1654

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine sixteenth century Netherlands business organisation and accounting practices, then the most advanced in Western Europe, to test Sombart's theory that scientific double entry bookkeeping was an essential prerequisite for the development of modern capitalism and the emergence of the public corporation during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Rather than being a development of Paciolian bookkeeping, double‐entry bookkeeping in sixteenth century Netherlands was grounded in northern German (Hanseatic) business practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixteenth century Dutch business records and Dutch and German bookkeeping texts are used to establish that north German Hanseatic commercial practices exercised the greatest influence on The Netherlands' bookkeeping practices immediately prior to the development of the capitalistic commercial enterprise in the first years of the seventeenth century.

Findings

Contrary to Sombart's thesis, scientific double‐entry bookkeeping was rarely used in sixteenth century Netherlands, which became Europe's most sophisticated commercial region during the late sixteenth century and early seventeenth century. Instead, extant commercial archives and the numerous sixteenth century accounting texts suggest that Hanseatic business practices and agents' (factors') bookkeeping were the dominant influence on northern Netherlands' business practices at this time. The organisation and administrative practices of Netherlands' businesses prior to the seventeenth century, especially their decentralised structure and lack of a common capital, were founded on Hanseatic practices that were considerably different to the best Italian practice of the time.

Research limitations/implications

North German influences on Dutch accounting and business practices have significant implications for social theories of the development of capitalism, notably that of Bryer, that assume the use of a scientific (capitalistic) form of double‐entry bookkeeping was essential to the development of capitalism from the seventeenth century. This is tested in a subsequent paper which examines the accounting practices of the Dutch East India Company (Verenigde Oost‐Indische Compagnie or VOC) which was founded in 1602 at the very cusp of modern capitalism. The research presented here was partially constrained by the scarcity of transcriptions of original sixteenth century bookkeeping records.

Originality/value

The vigorous debate in the accounting history literature about the dependence of modern capitalism upon a scientific (capitalistic) form of double entry bookkeeping prompted by Sombart has been mainly concerned with England. This paper introduces into the debate material which documents the accounting and business practices of the most commercially advanced region of Europe in the late sixteenth century and the influence of Dutch bookkeeping texts.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Jesse W.J. Weltevreden

To empirically study the uptake of collection‐and‐delivery points (CDPs) in The Netherlands and its consequences for retailers, shopping centres, and mobility.

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Abstract

Purpose

To empirically study the uptake of collection‐and‐delivery points (CDPs) in The Netherlands and its consequences for retailers, shopping centres, and mobility.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses 2006 data from an online consumer survey and data provided by the major CDP companies in The Netherlands. In addition, two Dutch directors of CDP companies were interviewed.

Findings

The service point is nowadays the dominant form of CDP in The Netherlands. However, in 2006 only 1.4 percent of all online orders in The Netherlands were delivered at a service point. In addition, Dutch consumers currently mainly use service points for returning their online orders. As such, positive mobility effects of service points are so far small. Nevertheless, for retailers operating a service point may lead to additional revenues, as one in four online shoppers make a purchase when collecting or returning a parcel.

Research limitations/implications

Since service points – at least in The Netherlands – are nowadays mainly used for returning online orders, future empirical research should not neglect the reverse logistics function of CDPs.

Practical implications

Online shoppers are more willing to use the service point concept when they have many service points in the vicinity of their home. In addition, service points with many consumers in their immediate surroundings also perform best. A five minutes driving distance by car seems the critical accessibility value for the success of this concept.

Originality/value

Using nation‐wide representative samples the paper makes a significant contribution to the scarce empirical literature on the uptake and consequences of CDPs for retailers, shopping centres, and mobility.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2012

Trine Agervig Carstensen and Anne-Katrin Ebert

Purpose – This chapter traces the development of cycling in several European countries over the period from the 1880s to the present, with special focus on the two cycling…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter traces the development of cycling in several European countries over the period from the 1880s to the present, with special focus on the two cycling nations, Denmark and The Netherlands.

Methodology – Drawing on a wide array of research on bicycle use in Europe in the twentieth century as well as primary sources, the chapter pays particular attention to the users of the bicycle, their organisations and the mixture of male and female, young and old, and rich and poor, because these users were the people who actually shaped cycling cultures.

Findings – While acknowledging that geographical conditions cannot be fully ruled out as contributing factors, the authors point out that political, social and cultural aspects were all woven together into what would become increasingly distinctive national cycling cultures.

Value – This study provides historical context for recent efforts to increase cycling participation by identifying relevant cultural, social and political factors, and providing insights into the trajectories of Dutch and Danish cycling cultures.

Details

Cycling and Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-299-9

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Fostering Productivity: Patterns, Determinants and Policy Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-840-7

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Rima Alkirawan, Ramin Kawous, Evert Bloemen, Maria van den Muijsenbergh, Simone Goosen, Jeanine Suurmond and Fijgje de Boer

This study is oriented towards getting insight into the perspectives, knowledge and practices among Syrian refugees regarding antibiotic use and prescribing in Dutch primary care.

Abstract

Purpose

This study is oriented towards getting insight into the perspectives, knowledge and practices among Syrian refugees regarding antibiotic use and prescribing in Dutch primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

A thematic qualitative study was carried out using semi-structured interviews with 12 Syrian refugees living in the Netherlands. Data analysis consisted of three steps and was oriented towards the development of themes.

Findings

Participants were confronted with restricted access to antibiotics in the Netherlands which was contrary to their experiences in Syria. Some of them continued to self-prescribe antibiotics, while others adhered to the Dutch General Practitioner (GP)’s advice. Especially mothers with young children took up the Dutch GP’s advice. Syrian refugees expressed health beliefs about the healing effects of antibiotics which are related to their past experiences of use and which influenced their current use. Respondents complained about the Dutch health-care system and expressed a preference for the one in Syria.

Research limitations/implications

Syrian refugees vary in their way of dealing with restricted access to antibiotics in Dutch primary care. More in-depth knowledge is required to improve refugee patient–doctor communication about antibiotic use.

Practical implications

The message that antibiotics are not needed may be challenging. Additional communication seems to be necessary to persuade Syrian refugees from self-prescribing antibiotics. Therefore, identifying refugee patient concerns and carefully counseling and communicating it with them is substantial. Developing educational toolkits consisting of various experiences of antibiotic use and ways of dealing with it can equip doctors to more adequately react to migrants’ needs for care.

Social implications

Primary care professionals seem insufficiently equipped to tackle issues related to antibiotic use amongst newly arrived migrants. Therefore, it is important to support professionals in their communication with this patient group about the proper use of antibiotics.

Originality/value

This study shows that more in-depth knowledge is needed about the strategies of newly arrived migrants and their complex reactions to treatment prescriptions with which they are not familiar.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Sophie Hennekam and Loubna Tahssain-Gay

The purpose of this paper is to provide a cross-cultural comparison of the attitudes toward diversity among human resource managers working for the same multinational…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a cross-cultural comparison of the attitudes toward diversity among human resource managers working for the same multinational company in the Netherlands and Morocco.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 35 semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted by telephone and were analyzed by the use of content analysis. Hofstede’s cultural dimensions were used as theoretical framework.

Findings

The findings suggest that attitudes toward diversity are changing and not always in line with Hofstede’s scores from 2010. Differences between the Netherlands and Morocco are discussed and trends in both countries are outlined.

Originality/value

While it has been argued that Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are relatively stable over time, the findings show that attitudes toward diversity are evolving in the light of the changing environment and that other cultural factors also play an important role.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

S.S. Gustafsson and M. Bruyn‐Hundt

Compares the way women are taxed in the Germany, Sweden and TheNetherlands by looking at both macro and micro data from the perspectiveof a wife′s contribution to family…

Abstract

Compares the way women are taxed in the Germany, Sweden and The Netherlands by looking at both macro and micro data from the perspective of a wife′s contribution to family income. The programs used for analysis are included in an appendix. Taxing husbands and wives by adding joint incomes and dividing by two (as in Germany) penalises dual‐earner couples and favours one‐earner couples. Completely separate taxation (as in Sweden) is a major incentive for couples to be dual‐earner. In The Netherlands the government reform of the tax system (1990) has reduced negative tax effects on secondary earnings without introducing the positive effects seen in Sweden. Tax incentives are not the only determinant of women′s participation in the labour market.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 18 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

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