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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Dah-Kwei Liou, Li-Chun Hsu and Wen-Hai Chih

Based on the tricomponent attitude model, a research model is developed to investigate the factors that influence users’ use intentions regarding broadband television

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the tricomponent attitude model, a research model is developed to investigate the factors that influence users’ use intentions regarding broadband television. These factors are divided into vendor’s service and personal psychology perspectives. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The research sample consisted of 631 respondents with experience in using broadband television. This study adopted structural equation modeling to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results show that the structural model has a good fit and indicates that perceived system quality, perceived content quality, customization, perceived ease of use, and perceived risk directly influence users’ opinions toward broadband television and indirectly affect their continuance intention to use through attitude to use.

Practical implications

From a managerial standpoint, this study can assist internet protocol television (IPTV) service providers in understanding the critical determinants that influence consumers’ continuance intention to use IPTV.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the understanding of consumers’ continuance intention to use IPTV by introducing customers’ perspectives for vendor’s service factors (perceived system quality, perceived content quality, customization, and perceived ease of use) to current theoretical models. From a personal psychology perspective, this study provides sound evidence that the determinants of perceived price level and perceived risk are critical factors that affect consumers’ attitude to use and continuance intention to use of broadband televisions.

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Melissa M. Yang

Guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System’s model, this study documented acculturation and parental involvement in low-income Chinese immigrant homes that serve as…

Abstract

Guided by Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological System’s model, this study documented acculturation and parental involvement in low-income Chinese immigrant homes that serve as predictors of parental mediation. By surveying 165 parents of 3–13-year-old immigrant children, this study found that low-income Chinese parents enacted restrictive mediation the most and exhibited a slow acculturation process even after an average of seven years of emigration. Higher parental acculturation was related to a higher use of active and restrictive mediation. Additionally, different aspects of parental involvement also served as predictors of the three mediation strategies. Chinese cultural emphasis on academic excellence and success was used to help interpret the findings. Future research should consider implementing research-based adult media literacy programs for immigrant parents to help them practice their parental mediation skills in the host culture.

Details

Media and Power in International Contexts: Perspectives on Agency and Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-455-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Kara Chan

The purpose of this paper is to examine how perceptions of truthfulness of television advertising and perceptions of brands vary among urban and rural children in Mainland…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how perceptions of truthfulness of television advertising and perceptions of brands vary among urban and rural children in Mainland China and also to collect information about the basis of judgment children used to determine whether commercials are true.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive statistics were compiled to give the perceptions of television advertising and brands of the overall sample, as well as the urban and rural sub‐samples. Chi‐square tests and independent sample t‐tests were conducted to examine the urban‐rural difference in perceptions of television advertising and brands. The sample was divided into two groups that were of similar size (age six to nine and age ten‐15). Chi‐square tests were conducted to examine the age difference in advertising perceptions.

Findings

The urban‐rural difference in consumer perceptions of advertising and brands indicates that children's development in consumer socialization depends on the environment. Urban respondents were more skeptical towards advertising than rural children. Urban and rural children shared two similarities: older children were less likely to perceive television commercials truthful than younger children. Younger children liked television commercials more than older children.

Research limitations/implications

The three surveyed urban cities were highly advanced in terms of their economies and advertising development compared with all other Chinese cities. The seven surveyed rural counties cannot be generalized to the very poor rural provinces in China.

Practical implications

The study should serve as an advertising guideline for marketers and advertisers that target urban and rural children in China.

Originality/value

This paper offers insights for employing different advertising message strategies to disseminate market information to urban as well as rural children in China.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Carla Ruiz Mafé and Silvia Sanz Blas

To analyse key drivers of television dependency and its impact on teleshopping adoption.

Abstract

Purpose

To analyse key drivers of television dependency and its impact on teleshopping adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The applicability of the media dependency scale is tested in the Spanish market. The impact of demographics, television exposure and television affinity on television dependency is analysed together with behavioural changes deriving from television dependency (willingness to teleshopping).

Findings

Data analysis shows that the media dependency scale needs to be adapted to the Spanish market and Spanish televiewers show intermediate levels of television dependency. Dependent televiewers are mainly mature, feel high‐television affinity and have high levels of exposure as televiewers. Television dependency determines teleshopping adoption, with the most relevant factor being that of searching guides for decision taking and fun.

Practical implications

This research enables companies to know the different objectives which television can help consumers to attain and, therefore, what aspects to highlight in their direct marketing strategies. Television agents should exploit the dimensions television offers to increase individual dependency and message effectiveness. The significant influence that “decision taking and fun” exerts on willingness to teleshopping shows managers that program contents become a key tool to increase future television purchases.

Originality/value

Despite dramatic online differences were discovered between television dependent and non‐dependent consumers, very limited research has been conducted to examine them. There are still no enough studies that analyse the background and effects of television dependency on the non‐purchasing televiewers behaviour. This paper analyses the background of television dependency and its influence on future purchase intentions of non‐buyer Spanish televiewers.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Jihye Park and Sharron J. Lennon

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of psychological traits and shopping environmental factors on impulse buying tendency via television shopping programs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of psychological traits and shopping environmental factors on impulse buying tendency via television shopping programs and to reflect the inherent nature of the impulsive television shopping environment in the USA as well as the traditional retail channel.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 154 questionnaires were returned from multichannel customers who purchased apparel from television shopping programs and traditional retail stores.

Findings

Five causal relationships among impulse buying and interaction tendencies in both television and retail settings and TV shopping program browsing duration proposed in this study were confirmed through structural equation modeling.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds valuable empirical findings to the literature on the distribution channel relationship by examining buying behavior of multichannel customers as well as some theoretical implications for impulse buying‐related theories.

Originality/value

This study provides insights for customer impulse buying behavior in the multiple shopping environments.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

David Oberhelman

– -- The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected list of free and subscription web resources for film and television (screen) studies.

Abstract

Purpose

-- The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected list of free and subscription web resources for film and television (screen) studies.

Design/methodology/approach

-- Reference sources on film and other media studies were located, evaluated, and selected. The list is divided into four broad research categories; research databases and film catalogs (subscription products); film and television catalogs/databases (gratis); historical film streaming sites; and film studies portal sites.

Findings

-- There are a wide variety of resources available online that users can freely access as well as robust subscription products currently available to libraries to support research in film and television studies. Students and scholars can use both free and fee-based sites for film catalogs, film studies journal indexes, streaming video content, and other information and analysis on visual media.

Originality/value

-- There has not been a bibliographic list of online film studies resources undertaken since 2005, and many new web resources as well as databases have emerged in the field. The annotated list of resources in this study seeks to supplement and update what has been previously discussed in the LIS literature on web-based reference sources available for libraries supporting film and television studies.

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2007

Nathalie Dens, Patrick De Pelsmacker and Lynne Eagle

The purpose of this paper is to investigate parents' attitudes toward advertising to children, and advertised foods in particular, as well as parental concern regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate parents' attitudes toward advertising to children, and advertised foods in particular, as well as parental concern regarding children's nutrition habits and the degree to which these perceptions influence television monitoring by parents.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire assessing attitudes was distributed among parents of Belgian primary and secondary school children. Parental mediation of television viewing was measured by self‐reports. A structural equation model was built using data from a sample of 485 parents.

Findings

The study finds that parental nutrition attitudes and the degree to which advertising causes family conflicts and pestering are among the most important drivers of restrictive mediation of television. Attitudes towards food advertising, the degree to which children can understand the commercial intent of advertising and the perceived influence of advertisements on children do not directly affect restrictive mediation.

Research limitations/implications

The model was based on a single‐country study, and did not distinguish between parents of different socio‐economic backgrounds or between parents with children in different age categories. All the constructs used in this model were self‐reports. The model could also be extended to encompass different types of mediation.

Practical implications

Parents serve as gatekeepers for children's television viewing. Advertisers targeting children need to obtain the green light of the gatekeepers before they can reach the children. It is therefore important that advertisers have an understanding of how parents perceive advertising and which factors specifically incite them to restrict their children's viewing.

Originality/value

Attitudes of parents are considered as a multidimensional construct, consisting of “commercial intent”, “conflict” and a separate component relating to advertised foods. The differential impact of each of these components, as well as parents' nutritional concerns and perceived advertisement influence, on restrictive mediation is assessed.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

George Moschis, Fon Sim Ong, Anil Mathur, Takako Yamashita and Sarah Benmoyal‐Bouzaglo

The purpose of this study is to examine whether the development of materialistic values in early life reflects cultural norms or is the outcome of media and family…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine whether the development of materialistic values in early life reflects cultural norms or is the outcome of media and family influences. It seeks to examine the role of family communication and television, which were found to promote materialistic values in individualistic countries, by assessing their effects on youths in four countries that represent the Eastern and Western cultures: Japan, Malaysia, USA, and France.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used an anonymous self‐administered survey of young adults aged 18 to 32 years in two diverse Eastern countries: Japan and Malaysia (total n=351); the sample size was approximately the same for the Western countries of USA and France (n=315). The samples were equivalent with respect to demographic characteristics. The Malaysian questionnaires were available in both English and Malay. Measurement scales included in the Japanese questionnaires come from available translated versions. The French questionnaires were subjected to back translation.

Findings

The findings suggest that the influence of the socio‐oriented family communication structure on materialistic attitudes in Western cultures might be indirect by affecting the youth's patterns of television viewing. The findings also suggest that concept‐oriented family communication has no effect on youth's development of materialistic values, regardless of cultural background.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that television might not be as important a socialization agent in the development of materialistic values of youths in collectivistic Eastern countries as it has been in individualistic Western countries

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Pan Ji and W. Wayne Fu

This study aims to examine how information and social gratifications sought by Internet users affect their affinity for the Internet or for particular types of online content.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how information and social gratifications sought by Internet users affect their affinity for the Internet or for particular types of online content.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered in Singapore to collect data. A correlation analysis, a paired‐sample t test, and hierarchical regression analyses are conducted to address the research questions and hypotheses.

Findings

Affinity for the Internet and affinity for particular types of online content are correlated and distinct. Both relate positively to social gratifications. The passive social gratification of Internet access and the active pursuit of interactions exert similar impact on both types of affinity. Information affects neither after social gratifications are controlled.

Practical implications

Constant access to online contacts or quality online interaction may facilitate social gratifications, thereby boosting user affinity for the Internet or for particular types of online content. Online information should be presented interactively to attract and retain users. The selection of online content and applications should also be made easier to cultivate a loyal user market.

Originality/value

This study contributes to U&G theory by adapting a television‐based proposition to cyberspace, and examining the attitudinal effect of online social gratifications involving different levels of user activity.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Nancy Hill Allen

The mass media are cultural pipelines through which flow hours of entertainment and information. They represent a part of our culture which critics decry and media…

Abstract

The mass media are cultural pipelines through which flow hours of entertainment and information. They represent a part of our culture which critics decry and media specialists praise. They are difficult, if not impossible, to ignore. Television (free, cable, or pay) is the subject of attention of three‐year‐olds and Ph.D. candidates alike. Newspapers are perused daily by all classes and conditions of people and their content, ownership patterns, and circulation statistics are studied in journalism classes, high schools, and by worried editors and publishers. Films entertained children in Nickelodeons, raised the spirits of millions during World War II, and now are the subject of so much analysis that words like ‘pan,’ ‘take,’ and ‘track’ have taken on new meaning in the vocabulary of most ordinary citizens.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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