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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Kent Bressie, Michael Kende and Howard Williams

To review the relationship between the nature of telecommunications sector reform and the commitments under the WTO, and determine the impact on sector performance.

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Abstract

Purpose

To review the relationship between the nature of telecommunications sector reform and the commitments under the WTO, and determine the impact on sector performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed which links sector reforms and WTO commitments. Publicly available, data are then used to populate the model and explore the correlations between sector reform, WTO commitments and sector performance.

Findings

The empirical analysis suggests a strong and positive correlation between positive changes in sector performance and sector reform supported by WTO commitments.

Research limitations/implications

The sequencing of the reform agenda and the use of WTO commitments as part within the political economy of a particular country are important issues which future research may consider. The lack of consistent cross‐sectional data prevented the adoption of more formal econometric analysis.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the close integration of a number of policy measures if sector reform within a country is to be successful. The role of the WTO commitments may be significant not only in shaping the details of internal policy measures, but also as a credibility signal to investors.

Originality/value

In light of the Doha round of negotiations within the WTO, in particular the “Singapore Agenda”, this paper makes a significant contribution to understanding the relationship between WTO commitments and reform of the telecommunications sector.

Details

info, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Daniel Roseman

To assess the impact of China's WTO commitments on foreign investment flows, domestic regulation and industry performance in the telecommunications services sector.

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Abstract

Purpose

To assess the impact of China's WTO commitments on foreign investment flows, domestic regulation and industry performance in the telecommunications services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Situates GATS disciplines in telecommunications in their historical context, then reviews China's specific commitments, and finally reviews available data on developments in China since accession.

Findings

China's commitments on market access and national treatment in telecommunications services are rather modest, and China is lagging in the implementation of regulatory disciplines. Nevertheless, China has gone a long distance toward a complete transformation of the telecommunications sector with little outside influence and no outside ownership or control. It is mainly because the prospect of joining the WTO and opening to the world galvanized government and industry into action. The overall thrust of those actions, however, has been to ensure that telecommunications plays its full role as a strategic economic sector and helps deliver economic benefits to the Chinese people in order to legitimize Communist Party leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Up‐to‐date and coherent data on industry performance (e.g. penetration rates, productivity increases, etc.) are lacking.

Practical implications

Very useful background and analysis relating to: relationship between, on the one hand, international trade commitments and, on the other hand, domestic reforms and industry performance; and on‐going issues in China's efforts to implement its WTO obligations and to create a statutory, regulatory and institutional framework supportive of continued growth of the telecommunications sector in China.

Originality/value

Responds to an identified information need with information and analysis of practical value.

Details

info, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Thomas J.O. Afullo

By 2016, Botswana aspires to triple its 1994 per capita income and to completely diversify its economic base. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) objectives…

1984

Abstract

By 2016, Botswana aspires to triple its 1994 per capita income and to completely diversify its economic base. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) objectives, as spelt out in the SADC Policy document, emphasise the attainment of enhanced development and economic growth, poverty alleviation, and support of the socially disadvantaged through regional integration. Since telecommunications have long been recognised as the engine for economic growth, the aspirations of SADC and Botswana are consistent with the SADC Protocol on Transport, Communications, and Metrology, which aims at developing a reliable, efficient, vibrant, consumer‐driven telecommunications sector. We examine the focus of the World Bank and the International Telecommunications Union, in global telecommunications development. We then discuss the efforts of Botswana and other SADC states in ensuring that they take advantage of the private sector finances to build reliable, sophisticated public telecommunications networks for entry into the Global Information Infrastructure (GII).

Details

Internet Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Patricia McCormick

This paper aims to examine the influence of private corporations in the tripartite structure of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU): Telecommunications

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of private corporations in the tripartite structure of the International Telecommunications Union (ITU): Telecommunications Standardization, Radiocommunication, and Telecommunications Development.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs institutional ethnography in conjunction with the case study.

Findings

The paper finds that, in the standardization sector, power has been effectively transferred from nation states to the private corporate sector since the approval process now enables standards to be approved by members of the study group that developed them, which is essentially the private sector. In the radiocommunication sector, the private sector continues to conduct much of the requisite technical work, but national governments are ultimately the decision makers and, further, it is difficult to distinguish between treaty and non‐treaty work. In the development sector, the ITU seeks to create an enabling environment for private investment in developing countries and actively seeks to build private sector partnerships. In the long run the ITU may be unable to satisfy either its narrow corporate constituency or the vast majority of its developing country members.

Originality/value

As the United Nations agency which coordinates satellite spacing and allocates access to the electromagnetic spectrum on an international basis, the ITU is the world's most prominent international telecommunications institution, so its structural modifications and membership changes are of great significance in a world increasingly dependent on a global grid of wired and wireless telecommunications networks. This paper sheds light on these.

Details

info, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Esther van Zimmeren, Emmanuelle Mathieu and Koen Verhoest

Many European-level networks and regulatory constellations in different sectors (e.g., energy, telecommunications) without clear anchorage into the European Union (EU…

Abstract

Purpose

Many European-level networks and regulatory constellations in different sectors (e.g., energy, telecommunications) without clear anchorage into the European Union (EU) institutional landscape have been subject to increasing efforts by the EU institutions to tie them closer to the EU. They are serving increasingly as platforms for preparing EU policy or for implementing EU decisions, which may result in closer institutional bonds with the EU. This chapter aims at examining the differences and similarities between the process towards more EU-integration in two different domains (i.e., telecommunications and patents) and regulatory constellations (i.e., supranational and intergovernmental).

Methodology/approach

The chapter analyzes the evolution in the European telecommunication sector and the European Patent System and juxtaposes this analysis with the literature on institutionalization, Europeanization of regulatory network-organizations, and multilevel governance (MLG). It focuses on the role of the European Commission and the interaction with the national regulatory agencies (NRAs) and networks within the institutional framework.

Findings

Irrespective of the particular regime (intergovernmental/supranational) in a certain domain or sector, a common trend of closer coordination and integration prompted by the Commission is taking place, which triggers a certain resistance by the national bodies regulating that domain. As long as a specific competence is considered instrumental in the creation of the single market, the Commission has strong incentives to strengthen its influence in this field, even if those competences have been regulated through an independent intergovernmental regime.

Research implications

The dynamic described in this chapter allows us to reflect upon the MLG conception as developed by Marks and Hooghe (2004), which distinguish between two types of MLG. Type I MLG refers to different levels of governments, more specifically to the spread of power along different governmental levels and the interactions between them. Type II MLG refers to jurisdictions that are both task-specific and based on membership that can intersect with each other. They respond to particular problems in specific policy fields (Marks & Hooghe, 2004). Our analysis shows that the increase in coordination and integration are the outcome of both MLG Type II processes (coordination between two issue-specific bodies) and of MLG Type I processes (tensions between two governmental levels). Furthermore, the negotiation dynamics regarding this increased coordination and integration reveal that the tensions typical of MLG Type I took place as a consequence of the increased coordination between Type II bodies. Put differently, multi-level coordination and integration mechanisms in the EU can be seen as both Type I and Type II processes. They combine features of both categories and reveal that their Type I and Type II features are interdependent.

Practical implications

The analysis in this chapter shows a need for further strengthening the MLG Type I and II conceptual framework by balancing the analytical distinction between the two types with developments about how Type I and Type II are often entangled and intertwined with each other rather than separated realities.

Social implications

The chapter describes and compares the dynamics in the European telecommunications sector and the European patent system with interesting observations for NRAs and the European Commission with respect to coordination and integration.

Originality/value

The original nature of the current chapter relates to the two selected areas and the addition to the literature on MLG.

First, with respect to the areas investigated the dynamics of the European telecommunications sector have been analyzed also by other authors, but the European patent system is an area which is relatively unexplored in terms of governance research. The combination of the two sectors with a detailed analysis of similarities and differences is highly original and generates interesting lessons with respect to coordination and integration in supranational and intergovernmental regimes.

Second, Marks and Hooghe (2004) distinguish between the two types of MLG as if they are two different constructs that are not related to each other. Our cases and argument cover both types of MLG and show the interconnection between the dynamics taking place in the two types of MLG.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Dima Jamali

Traditionally, telecommunications was one of the economic sectors with the highest level of state ownership and activity. However, overwhelming pressures for change in…

Abstract

Traditionally, telecommunications was one of the economic sectors with the highest level of state ownership and activity. However, overwhelming pressures for change in this field have rendered old institutional arrangements and practices increasingly obsolete. As such, various countries have opted for a mix of policies including institutional restructuring, liberalization, and privatization. In Lebanon, since the end of the civil war in 1990, the government has been trying to restructure and modernize its telecommunications sector. The goal of the government was not simply to fix what was damaged by the war but rather to restructure and reform the telecommunications landscape, allowing the country to leapfrog into the twenty‐first century and the information age. This paper assesses the Lebanese post‐war experience with telecom reform. An overview of global trends in telecom reform is first presented. The performance of the Lebanese telecom sector is then examined and the main reform constraints identified. A comparative assessment against international benchmarks is also conducted. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for improving this sector’s performance are outlined.

Details

info, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Michel Berne

The paper aims to show how the introduction of the concept of universal service in the French telecommunications sector was impacted by the existence of a strong national

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to show how the introduction of the concept of universal service in the French telecommunications sector was impacted by the existence of a strong national tradition of public services. It also aims to show that universal service, as it is defined by the European telecom regulatory framework, was not the only possible set‐up. It also seeks to show how the concept of universal service was adapted to the French national situation and spread beyond the telecommunications sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of the paper is chronological, starting with an analysis of the French tradition of public services and then showing how the discussion developed in France on the topic of universal service in the telecommunications sector. Then the paper deals with the practical implementation of universal service in the telecommunications sector and other sectors in France.

Findings

The paper shows that even though the French traditional views on public services did not make it easy to implement the European version of universal service in the telecommunications sector, it nevertheless happened. Universal service even spread beyond the telecommunications sector in France.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concentrates on French views on the topic and does not study the opinions of other stakeholders (the European Commission, other member states) as regards the French national tradition of public services.

Practical implications

The paper can be used as a guide to ongoing discussions on the evolution of universal service in Europe as it provides alternate views on the topic.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehesive review of the topic.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Patrick Xavier

The purpose of this paper is to use “best practice” regulatory principles to derive proposals for fostering competition in Thailand's telecommunications market.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use “best practice” regulatory principles to derive proposals for fostering competition in Thailand's telecommunications market.

Design/methodology/approach

On‐site research in Thailand was conducted, including interviews with a range of policy and regulatory agencies and telecommunications market participants.

Findings

The paper finds that Thailand's relatively late start in applying pro‐competitive regulation in the telecommunications sector presents an opportunity for installation of “regulatory leap‐frogging” measures proposed by the paper. The concession regime that prevails in Thailand is a major obstacle resulting in “gridlock” of Thailand's efforts to develop competition in the telecommunications sector. The Thai Constitution prohibits the regulator from directly regulating telecommunications companies operating on the basis of concessions that were in place prior to the adoption of the new telecommunications law. The paper examines this problem and points to a solution. Another major problem is the protracted absence of the National Broadcasting Commission that has been given joint responsibility (along with the National Telecommunications Commission) for spectrum management. Accordingly, pressing decisions regarding spectrum management cannot be made. The paper concludes that the two Commissions be merged (especially in the face of convergence). The paper finds that Thailand needs to develop and implement a national strategy for the development of communications infrastructure, including a collaborative approach to infrastructure development.

Originality/value

There are very few (if any) independent studies of policy and regulation of Thailand's telecommunications sector. More broadly, the paper indicates – by way of a case study – how “best practice” regulatory guidelines might be applied to enhance competition in developing countries.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Robert Queck

Considers the future of telecommunications’ national regulatory authorities (NRAs), by way of analysing the European telecommunications regulatory framework. Examines the…

Abstract

Considers the future of telecommunications’ national regulatory authorities (NRAs), by way of analysing the European telecommunications regulatory framework. Examines the organization and functioning of NRAs, maintaining efficient performance of the required various tasks. Concludes an NRA is entrusted with “rule application” rather than with “rule making” tasks.

Details

info, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the innovation process of organizations representing the main sectors of Brazilian economic activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature review focuses on analyzing the innovation process characteristics regarding the innovation types. The authors carried out interviews with executives and managers in charge of innovation at the leading large companies in the respective sectors analyzed. The data analysis of this qualitative research was structured in three steps. The first step is the analysis of data collected for encoding, the second step, the summarization of the common points presented by the companies in each sector and, finally, the interpretation of these data, aided by triangulation from secondary data that support the analysis of the collected primary data.

Findings

The main contribution of this study is to characterize the innovation process of organizations representing the main sectors of the Brazilian economy, with a classification regarding the sectoral innovation standard.

Practical implications

The authors’ intent is that the paper can contribute with a comparative analysis among companies of the same sector and, subsequently, among companies of the different surveyed sectors. Thus, the characterization aims to present the companies’ innovation process and the comparative analysis aims to verify the innovation sectoral patterns. In addition, as implications for management practice, some strategies for better knowledge management in the organization are suggested for each type of innovation.

Originality/value

The main theoretical contribution focuses on the development of a conceptual model that structures the analyzed variables of the constructs “innovation process” and “innovation sectoral patterns”, allowing not only the characterization but also the comparative analysis of the representative organizations present in the sample.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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