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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Patricia K. Kubow and Allison H. Blosser

This discussion essay explores trends and issues in the teaching of comparative education. We argue that the field of Comparative and International Education (CIE) must…

Abstract

This discussion essay explores trends and issues in the teaching of comparative education. We argue that the field of Comparative and International Education (CIE) must give more attention to the aspect of teaching, as comparative education courses are increasingly being affected by diminishing devotion to social foundations of education programming in many institutions of higher education and schools. Ironically, despite growing pluralism, the rise of economic utilitarianism has led to technicist-driven curriculum and less inquiry about philosophical, historical, and cultural assumptions underlying educational policy and practice. Another challenge in the teaching of comparative education is that students are often ill-prepared to understand and utilize the most basic social science concepts. Recognizing that teaching and research in CIE are inevitably linked, it is argued that a transformational model that advances CIE across disciplines, schools, and departments may reinforce its importance and ensure that the benefits that comparative inquiry affords – namely critical reflexivity, insight about school–society relationships, and possibilities for educational improvement – are addressed and safeguarded in tertiary and teacher education. An understanding of cultural and national contexts is important to educational reform and enables educators to view globalization in terms of how it benefits or undermines humanistic aims, namely the importance of individuals and the uniqueness of cultures.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Nidhi Srinivas

The purpose of this paper is to ask what can be learned from contemporary resistance to neo‐liberal policies in Latin America, in terms of broadening the disciplinary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask what can be learned from contemporary resistance to neo‐liberal policies in Latin America, in terms of broadening the disciplinary understanding of civil society actors.

Design/methodology/approach

Management, international management, and non‐profit management studies are reviewed and assessed through a lateral reading.

Findings

The field of management studies and the sub‐field of international management are identified as parochial in orientation, ignoring the diversity of local management knowledge and the organizational settings where practiced.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the narrow foci of the field of management, on Northern contexts, and large international business organizations. It calls for greater sensitivity to the diverse and significant efforts to resist and mitigate neo‐liberal policies globally.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2018

Antonio Francesco Maturo and Veronica Moretti

In a world dominated by scores, ratings, and rankings, near-constant measurement can make one think, and in turn act, differently. Quantification is felt to be necessary…

Abstract

In a world dominated by scores, ratings, and rankings, near-constant measurement can make one think, and in turn act, differently. Quantification is felt to be necessary. On a social level, the manufacturing of numbers paves the way for the politicization of numbers, which then allows the regulation of a person’s activities. The setting of seemingly unobjectionable thresholds and limits in fact contributes to the creation of government strategies that conceive of every citizen as a calculable thing. Further, assuming that these numbers are socially constructed elements, a numerical hegemony may develop in which those who do not possess the desired scores suffer social exclusion. The quantification of life has many implications in the realm of social justice. It is conceivable that, in the future, society could acquire some of the characteristics imagined by the writers of dystopian literature. Fourcade and Healy (2013) write that our society is experiencing a transition from distinct social classes to classification based on personal scores and ratings. Indeed, in the United States, the “credit score” is a number which is as important for the modern individual as titles were to medieval to nobility because they determine one’s access to credit. Personal scores and ratings – which could be not only financial but also social or political – could therefore exclude some sectors of society. In this case, too, a numerical indicator holds immense power, making this form of political violence appear as objective and even natural.

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Digital Health and the Gamification of Life: How Apps Can Promote a Positive Medicalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-366-9

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Abstract

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Cliff Lockyer

Abstract

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Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Abstract

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Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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Abstract

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Symposium on Public Finance in the History of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-699-5

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Marlene Morrison

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a retrospective and prospective exploration of some of the challenges faced by doctoral education, specifically as they relate to advanced studies of educational administration (EA).

Methodology

It applies a critical stance to the current status of knowledge in the ‘leadership field’ and the intellectual underpinnings that inform the studies available as reference for doctoral students.

Findings

Nested within wider changing conditions for university and doctoral education, it is argued that the published field as currently constituted suffers from both banal and ‘non-wicked’ leadership orthodoxies that might lead to doctoral stagnation.

Practical implications

Reasons are suggested and prospects considered for revitalising scholarship for the upcoming generation of EA alumni, scholars and practitioners.

Details

Investing in our Education: Leading, Learning, Researching and the Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-131-2

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

D. Brent Edwards

Though we have recently witnessed the “exponential production of digital data to measure, analyze, and predict educational performance” (Salajan & Jules, this volume)…

Abstract

Though we have recently witnessed the “exponential production of digital data to measure, analyze, and predict educational performance” (Salajan & Jules, this volume), there has not been sufficient attention given to the quantitative methods that are used to process and transform this data in order to arrive at findings related to “what works”. This chapter addresses this gap by discussing a range of constraints that affect the main methods used for this purpose, with these methods being known as “impact evaluation.” Specifically, this chapter addresses its purpose, first, by making explicit the methodological assumptions, technical weaknesses, and practical shortcomings of the two main forms of impact evaluation—regression analysis and randomized controlled trials. Although the idea of Big Data and the ability to process it is receiving more attention, the underlying point here is that these new initiatives and advances in data collection are still dependent on methods that have serious limitations. To that end, not only do proponents of Big Data avoid or downplay discussion of the methodological pitfalls of impact evaluation, they also fail to acknowledge the political and organizational dynamics that affect the collection of data. To the extent that such methods will increasingly be used to guide public policy around the globe, it is essential that stakeholders inside and outside education systems are informed about their weaknesses—methodologically and in terms of their inability to take the politics out of policymaking. While the promises of Big Data are seductive, they have not replaced the human element of decision making.

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The Educational Intelligent Economy: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the Internet of Things in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-853-4

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Terry Locke

The purpose of this paper is to offer a personalised overview of the content of English Teaching: Practice and Critique for the years it was hosted at the Wilf Malcolm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a personalised overview of the content of English Teaching: Practice and Critique for the years it was hosted at the Wilf Malcolm Institute for Educational Research (WMIER) at the University of Waikato (2002-2014).

Design/methodology/approach

It notes trends in relationship to the context of origin of 335 articles published in this period (excluding editorials), including significant increases in articles originating in the USA and Pacific Rim Asian nations, particularly South Korea and Taiwan. It comments on articles that relate to the original vision of the editors’ founders, especially their emphasis on practice, criticality and social justice.

Findings

Prevailing themes across 13 years are mapped and in some cases discussed.

Originality/value

A number of reflections are shared in relation to the future of the journal and some challenges currently facing subject English.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

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