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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Jackie Coyle‐Shapiro

A longitudinal research design was used to investigate the effectsof a TQM intervention on teamwork in a manufacturing setting. Indicatesthat TQM intervention did not have…

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1568

Abstract

A longitudinal research design was used to investigate the effects of a TQM intervention on teamwork in a manufacturing setting. Indicates that TQM intervention did not have a significant direct effect on teamwork. However, one aspect of the intervention, supervisory reinforcement, had a significant indirect effect on teamwork through its impact on changes in trust in colleagues. Overall, employee assess‐ment of the intervention was found to be a better predictor of teamwork than participation in the intervention per se.

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Employee Relations, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jason Rodriquez

This article examines how a profit-centered restructuring of labor relations in an academic medical center undermined team-based care practices in its intensive care unit…

Abstract

This article examines how a profit-centered restructuring of labor relations in an academic medical center undermined team-based care practices in its intensive care unit. The Institute of Medicine has promoted team-based care to improve patient outcomes, and the staff in the intensive care unit researched for this paper had established a set of practices they defined as teamwork. After hospital executives rolled out a public relations campaign to promote its culture of teamwork, they restructured its workforce to enhance numerical and functional flexibility in three key ways: implementing a “service line” managerial structure; cutting a range of staff positions while combining others; and doubling the capacity of its profitable and highly regarded intensive care unit. Hospital executives said the restructuring was necessitated by changes to payment models brought forth by the Affordable Care Act. Based on 300 hours of participant-observation and 35 interviews with hospital staff, findings show that the restructuring lowered staff resources and intensified work, which limited their ability to practice care they defined as teamwork and undermined the unit’s collective identity as a team. Findings also show how staff members used teamwork as a sensitizing concept to make sense of what they did at work. The meanings attached to teamwork were anchored to positions in the hospitals’ organizational hierarchy. This paper advances our understanding of he flexible work arrangements in the health care industry and their effects on workers.

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Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management and the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-459-0

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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2016

Jan de Leede and Joyce Nijland

New Ways of Working practices like activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Due to these NWW practices, employees choose their…

Abstract

New Ways of Working practices like activity-based working and home-based work lead to different behaviors of employees. Due to these NWW practices, employees choose their own preferred times and places to work – albeit to a certain extent and within certain boundaries. This might have an impact on the possibilities for teamwork. Therefore, we suppose that teamwork and teamwork behaviors might moderate the relationship between NWW and outcomes. Does teamwork behavior have an influence on the relation of NWW and productivity or organizational commitment? And how, is it a positive or a negative influence on these relations? This chapter reports the results of an explorative study on the relationship between NWW practices, teamwork behavior, productivity, and organizational commitment. Quantitative data from the questionnaire will illustrate the main issues: the complex linkages between the four components of NWW, the outcome variables, and the effect of different components of teamwork behavior. This chapter describes the issue of teamwork and provides new data on the actual use and effectiveness of the different components of teamwork behaviors.

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New Ways of Working Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-303-7

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Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2021

Sakthi Mahenthiran, Robert Mackoy and Jane L. Y. Terpstra-Tong

This study examines how budgetary support (BS), teamwork, and organizational commitment to employees (OCE) affect firm performance across two countries, Malaysia and the…

Abstract

This study examines how budgetary support (BS), teamwork, and organizational commitment to employees (OCE) affect firm performance across two countries, Malaysia and the United States. By surveying senior managers of 165 small and medium enterprises, this study finds that teamwork and BS each has a direct effect on OCE and firm performance. Further, results indicate that OCE mediates the relationship between BS, teamwork, and firm performance. In Malaysia, but not in the United States, we find that teamwork affects performance directly. In the United States, but not in Malaysia, we find that BS affects performance, and there is an interaction effect between BS and management influence. We attribute the effects to the different national cultures and social-exchange relations and highlight the contributions to the budgeting research, organizational commitment literature, and to practice.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2008

Luis Ortiz and Francisco Llorente-Galera

The debate concerning the convergence or divergence of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations has grown in parallel with the importance of multinational…

Abstract

The debate concerning the convergence or divergence of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations has grown in parallel with the importance of multinational companies (MNCs) in OECD countries. The “country-of-origin effect” and “host-country effect” are two obvious poles of this debate (Ferner & Quintanilla, 1998). The country-of-origin effect claims the ability of MNCs to shape industrial relations and HRM practices in their subsidiaries abroad, frequently in accordance with industrial relations practices and institutions in their country of origin. Conversely, the host-country effect stresses the resilience of industrial relations institutions at both the national (Whitley, 1999; Hall & Soskice, 2001; Katz & Darbishire, 2000) and the regional or local levels (Belanger, Berggren, Björkman, & Köhler, 1999; Ortiz, 2002). Yet, the possibility that each one of these effects could prevail under different circumstances has hardly been considered. Moreover, the roles of politics and structure within the organization (Edwards, Almond, Clark, Colling, & Ferner, 2005), as well as the role of local culture, have often been ignored.

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The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1401-0

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2020

Kuok Ho Daniel Tang

It is commonly believed that personality traits determine a person's ability to work in a team and academic performance. However, studies have shown inconsistent results…

Abstract

Purpose

It is commonly believed that personality traits determine a person's ability to work in a team and academic performance. However, studies have shown inconsistent results with some personality traits better than the other in predicting students' performance in different academic majors. The purpose of this study is to examine the interrelation between personality traits, teamwork competencies and academic performance among first-year first semester engineering students in an Australian university located in the Sarawak state of Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The Individual and Team Performance (ITP) metrics were administered among 189 students to gauge their personality traits as well as self-rated and peer-rated teamwork competencies. The correlations between personality traits and teamwork competencies as well as correlations of both the variables to academic performance were subsequently analyzed.

Findings

This study shows no significant difference between the self-rated and peer-rated teamwork competencies. Adventurous trait appears to negatively correlate with teamwork competencies. This study also reveals teamwork competencies as better predictors of academic performance than personality traits. Commitment and focus show relatively larger effect on academic performance. It can be concluded that commitment is the most significant factor to excel in first-year engineering in the university. Therefore, interventions that promote commitment is crucial to academic performance of the first-year first semester engineering students.

Practical implications

This study promulgates the development of team competencies which are more crucial to academic excellence than personalities. It is useful for the design of team learning activities which lead to the development of teamwork competencies while improving academic performance. It shows that team activities which reinforce commitment especially and focus secondarily, will have significant positive effect on academic performance of the first-year engineering students generally.

Originality/value

While most studies in this area examine the correlation between personality traits and academic performance, this study is among the very few that looks into the aspect of teamwork competencies. This study also finds its value in its regional significance as such correlational studies are not prevalent in Malaysia.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2020

Victoria Walton, Anne Hogden, Janet C. Long, Julie Johnson and David Greenfield

This paper aims to explore if health professionals share understanding of teamwork that supports collaborative ward rounds.

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1244

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore if health professionals share understanding of teamwork that supports collaborative ward rounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A purpose-designed survey was conducted in two acute medical and two rehabilitation wards from a metropolitan teaching hospital. Medical officers, nurses and allied health professionals participated. To understand characteristics that support collaborative ward rounds, questions developed from literature and industry experience asked: what are the enablers and challenges to teamwork; and what are clinicians’ experiences of positive teamwork? Descriptive and thematic analyses were applied to the dimensions of effective teamwork as a framework for deductive coding.

Findings

Seventy-seven clinicians participated (93% response rate). Findings aligned with dimensions of teamwork framework. There was no meaningful difference between clinicians or specialty. Enablers to teamwork were: effective communication, shared understanding of patient goals, and colleague’s roles. Challenges were ineffective communication, individual personalities, lack of understanding about roles and responsibilities, and organisational structure. Additional challenges included: time; uncoordinated treatment planning; and leadership. Positive teamwork was influenced by leadership and team dynamics.

Practical implications

Ward rounds benefit from a foundation of collaborative teamwork. Different dimensions of teamwork present during ward rounds support clinicians’ shared understanding of roles, expectations and communication.

Originality/value

Rounds such as structured rounding, aim to improve teamwork. Inverting this concept to first develop effective collaboration will support team adaptability and resilience. This enables teams to transition between the multiple rounding processes undertaken in a single ward. The emphasis becomes high-quality teamwork rather than a single rounding process.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Elena de Prada Creo, Mercedes Mareque and Iago Portela-Pino

This study aims to determine whether university students are successfully acquiring or improving skills related to teamwork through a variety of extra-curricular…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine whether university students are successfully acquiring or improving skills related to teamwork through a variety of extra-curricular activities, such as sports, music, volunteering, international group work experiences and professional practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive statistics have been calculated to evaluate the normal behaviour of the variables. Accidental sampling was used via a cross-curricular study with a quasi-experimental design. An analysis of means was performed using the Student's t-test.

Findings

The results show the students to have highly developed interpersonal and communication skills, followed by adaptation and decision-making skills. The lowest scores corresponded to coordination and leadership skills. On the other hand, a significant correlation was established between extra-curricular activities and the acquisition of essential teamwork skills.

Originality/value

This study can confirm the important relation between extra-curricular activities and the acquisition of the teamwork skills that play a vital role in the overall development of our students, as well as for their integration into the job market, with particular emphasis on the acquisition of leadership skills which students are most lacking in, but which have shown to improve with any of the proposed activities. The promotion of the extra-curricular activities by the University, could greatly support our students' soft skills acquisition and complement their education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Nicoleta Meslec, Jacco Duel and Joseph Soeters

The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which teamwork (developed either during an initial training phase or during a subsequent deployment phase) is…

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2270

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which teamwork (developed either during an initial training phase or during a subsequent deployment phase) is influenced by the nature of the team’s environment (extreme vs non-extreme) and the extent to which teamwork is one of the explaining mechanisms for team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 60 teams at 2 time-points: training phase in The Netherlands or Germany and deployment phase (in locations such as Afghanistan and Bosnia-Herzegovina).

Findings

This study’s results indicate that when teams consider working in extreme environments, they develop higher levels of teamwork as compared to teams expecting to work in non-extreme environments. These differences remain stable also during the deployment phase, such that teams operating in extreme environments will continue to have higher levels of teamwork as compared to teams operating in non-extreme environments.

Originality/value

With this study, the authors contribute to the teamwork quality research stream by empirically studying how teamwork quality develops in unique military contexts such as extreme environments. Studies in such contexts are relatively rare.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Ivor J. Parry, David Tranfield, Stuart Smith, Morris Foster and Sarah Wilson

Reports on research resulting from a three year EPSRC funded project into teamworking in manufacturing companies. Investigates archetypal forms of teamworking rather than…

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2714

Abstract

Reports on research resulting from a three year EPSRC funded project into teamworking in manufacturing companies. Investigates archetypal forms of teamworking rather than focusing upon narrow or discrete sets of issues. Explores the dynamic capabilities of teamworking, firstly by considering changes in the manufacturing environment with its legacy of ‘old’ organisational forms and functions to contemporary environments where quality, flexibility and continuous improvement are key features, and secondly by discussing a detailed case history of one of the project’s collaborating companies. Identifies archetypal approaches to teamworking and explores benefits of a strategic organisational perspective. Argues that much of the teamworking literature fails to adopt either an organisational or strategic perspective, and hence is unable to acknowledge the complexity of such interventions. Reviews the implications of this more organisational approach for research design and investigation by means of a detailed case study, and explores the development of a strategic methodology for the effective introduction and development of teamworking into manufacturing companies.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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