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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Liz Hughes, Derek Tobin, Patrick McGlynn and Kevin Heffernan

Assertive outreach teams are working with a significant proportion of people with complex needs, including dual diagnosis. Government policy has highlighted the role of…

Abstract

Assertive outreach teams are working with a significant proportion of people with complex needs, including dual diagnosis. Government policy has highlighted the role of assertive outreach in engaging and intervening with this group. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a specific team‐focused training package and its trial in the Eastern and West Midlands regions.

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Mark Switzer and Brian H. Kleiner

Highlights some of the new techniques being implemented across the USA in the area of team training. Some are revolutionary but some are just fine tuning on already…

Abstract

Highlights some of the new techniques being implemented across the USA in the area of team training. Some are revolutionary but some are just fine tuning on already successful methods. Gives suggestions for trainers on how to deal with resistant, reluctant or resentful trainees. Reviews the methods used at one firm to train its trainers, and at another where a company‐wide policy was adopted to create a new value‐added training system. Concludes that some of the most effective training techniques are not new ‐ merely the application of old‐fashioned common sense to training problems.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Jared Freeman and Wayne Zachary

Technology for training military teams has evolved through a convergence of advances in simulation technology for individual and collective training, methods for analyzing…

Abstract

Technology for training military teams has evolved through a convergence of advances in simulation technology for individual and collective training, methods for analyzing teamwork and designing training solutions, and intelligent tutoring technologies that adapt training to the student, to accelerate learning. A number of factors have slowed this evolution toward intelligent team tutoring systems (ITTS), including the challenges of processing communications data, which are the currency of teamwork, and the paucity of automated and generalizable measures of team work. Several systems fulfill a subset of the features required of an ITTS, namely the use of team training objectives, teamwork models, measures of teamwork, diagnostic capability, instructional strategies, and adaptation of training to team needs. We describe these systems: the Advanced Embedded Training System (AETS), Synthetic Cognition for Operational Team Training (SCOTT), the AWO Trainer, the Benchmarked Experiential System for Training (BEST), and the Cross-Platform Mission Visualization Tool. We close this chapter with recommendations for future research.

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Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Lauren Blackwell Landon and William S. O’Keefe

Long-duration spaceflight missions require many hours of pre-mission and inflight training to develop and maintain team skills. Current training flows rely heavily on…

Abstract

Long-duration spaceflight missions require many hours of pre-mission and inflight training to develop and maintain team skills. Current training flows rely heavily on expert instructors, while current inflight mission operations are supported by a complex series of support teams at Mission Control. However, future exploration space missions will not have real-time communications with ground-based experts at Mission Control. Portable intelligent tutoring systems may help streamline future training, reducing the burden on expert instructors and crew training time, and allowing for inflight support to mitigate negative effects of the loss of real-time communications. In this chapter, we discuss the challenges of long-duration exploration missions, and outline the myriad possibilities in which intelligent tutoring systems will enhance the crew performance and functioning.

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Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Joan H. Johnston, C. Shawn Burke, Laura A. Milham, William M. Ross and Eduardo Salas

A key challenge for cost-effective Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) is the ability to create generalizable domain, learner, and pedagogical models so they can be…

Abstract

A key challenge for cost-effective Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs) is the ability to create generalizable domain, learner, and pedagogical models so they can be re-used many times over. Investment in this technology will be needed to succeed in developing ITSs for team training. The purpose of this chapter is to propose an instructional framework for guiding team ITS researchers in their development of these models for reuse. We establish a foundation for the framework with three propositions. First, we propose that understanding how teams develop is needed to establish a science-based foundation for modeling. Toward this end, we conduct a detailed exploration of the Kozlowski, Watola, Jensen, Kim, and Botero (2009) theory of team development and leadership, and describe a use case example to demonstrate how team training was developed for a specific stage in their model. Next, we propose that understanding measures of learning and performance will inform learner modeling requirements for each stage of team development. We describe measures developed for the use case and how they were used to understand teamwork skill development. We then discuss effective team training strategies and explain how they were implemented in the use case to understand their implications for pedagogical modeling. From this exploration, we describe a generic instructional framework recommending effective training strategies for each stage of team development. To inform the development of reusable models, we recommend selecting different team task domains and varying team size to begin researching commonalities and differences in the instructional framework.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2017

Sizwe Timothy Phakathi

This chapter discusses the miners’ informal working strategy of making a plan (planisa) in context of the relationship between teamwork training that was provided to the…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the miners’ informal working strategy of making a plan (planisa) in context of the relationship between teamwork training that was provided to the mining teams above the ground and its implementation in the underground mining workplace. The training programme was essentially about empowering and transforming frontline mining teams to self-directed work teams (SDWT) to understand the gold-mining business through the eyes of management. Its aim was to create new kinds of mineworkers who understood the what, how and why of the twenty-first-century mining business. AfricaGold sought to restructure the underground workplace through SDWT training in order to create a congenial, humane, democratic and more meaningful form of work processes, which permitted the mining teams to have greater flexibility in the production tasks they performed. The chapter reveals that the SDWT training seemed to have motivated the mining teams. Interestingly enough, this motivation tended to prevail even in situations of production bottlenecks. At the heart of this motivation was the miners’ organisational practice of making a plan. It is arguable that the SDWT training enhanced the desire of the mining work teams to make a plan in response to production blockages and managerial inefficiencies. This is essentially what the training aimed to do – to create new kinds of frontline mineworkers who are committed to achieving the productivity goals of a modern mining workplace. Ironically, the management of production did not seem to complement the inspiration and energy that the training instilled in the minds and hearts of the mining teams.

Details

Production, Safety and Teamwork in a Deep-Level Mining Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-564-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Paul Lyons

This study seeks to: involve team members in part of the actual design of training for their own team leaders; improve team leader knowledge and skills; and demonstrate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to: involve team members in part of the actual design of training for their own team leaders; improve team leader knowledge and skills; and demonstrate the use of skill charting (SC) for learning and performance improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Using focus groups of team members and q‐sort methodology we were able to have team members identify practical performance elements regarding the behavior of their team leaders. Integrating these performance elements into the training design for team leaders and using SC as a training tool, we were able to compare two groups of team leaders: one group (the study group) whose training focused, specifically, on the team‐generated performance elements and another group (the traditional group) whose training was focused on general, team leader performance elements.

Findings

In the perceptions of the team members, the S group team leaders, following training, performed more effectively regarding: response time, positive reinforcement, and focus on desired behavior of team members, than did the T group team leaders. Mean scores of ratings of performance were higher for S group team leaders than T group team leaders on all variables save one.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the nature of SC training, sample sizes could not be large; that is, sample sizes could not exceed 35 participants per each condition. Statistical tests are thus influenced. Other limitations involve the obvious time gap between actual training and the subsequent changes in behavior and performance. The study does offer considerable support to other research that makes use of SC training tools.

Practical implications

The activities undertaken in the study serve to involve team members, recognize their knowledge and skill, and empower them via decision making and personal recognition.

Originality/value

This study points to ways to involve team members directly in performance improvement and learning.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Michele N. Medina

This paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of an individual’s satisfaction with the team between conflict and training motivation. This study provides…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the mediating effect of an individual’s satisfaction with the team between conflict and training motivation. This study provides understanding regarding how the type of conflict within a team can influence an individual’s team experience which can, in turn, influence that individual’s training motivation and impact future teams.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 498 upper-level business students engaged in a team project. Structural equation modeling examined the serial mediation relationship between perceived diversity, conflict (affective and cognitive), individual satisfaction with the team and training motivation (learning and transfer).

Findings

Individual satisfaction with the team partially mediates the relationship between affective conflict and both training motivation dimensions, and fully mediates the relationship between cognitive conflict and both training motivation dimensions.

Practical implications

To encourage future participation in teams, managers should explore ways to increase an individual’s satisfaction, such as increasing the cognitive conflict by incorporating diversity within teams and reducing the affective conflict within teams. Likewise, by increasing an individual’s satisfaction with the team, managers can increase both the motivation to learn and transfer new knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper illuminates the role that an individual’s satisfaction with the team has between conflict and training motivation. Moreover, this paper demonstrates that more research on an individual’s satisfaction with the team is needed.

Details

Team Performance Management, vol. 22 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

John Hall

Presents the findings of research that aimed to develop a better understanding of the skills required in teamwork in British university libraries and the best ways of…

Abstract

Presents the findings of research that aimed to develop a better understanding of the skills required in teamwork in British university libraries and the best ways of developing these skills. The fieldwork for the project used a qualitative approach and interviews were conducted with members of a sample of teams from four “new” university libraries. The teams studied were found to be leader focused and the most frequently cited examples of good teamwork tended to depend on attitudes rather than skills. Communication was seen as a key skill, but task centred skills such as decision making were more important in working parties than in permanent teams. Suggested areas for attention include leadership training, staff selection, communication with part‐timers and the skills of open communication. Three of the four libraries had provided training in teamwork. Participants’ reactions to this are considered and tentative comment is offered on such matters as the relevance and objectives of training and the value of training for individual teams.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It…

Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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