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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Paul Hanselman, Jeffrey Grigg, Sarah K. Bruch and Adam Gamoran

Staff turnover may have important consequences for the development of collective social resources based on trust, shared norms, and support among school professionals. We…

Abstract

Staff turnover may have important consequences for the development of collective social resources based on trust, shared norms, and support among school professionals. We outline the theoretical role-specific consequences of principal and teacher turnover for features of principal leadership and teacher community, and we test these ideas in repeated teacher survey data from a sample of 73 Los Angeles elementary schools. We find evidence that principal turnover fundamentally disrupts but does not systematically decrease relational qualities of principal leadership; negative changes for initially high social resource schools offset positive changes for initially low social resource schools, suggesting that relational instability “resets” the resources that develop in the relationships between leadership and teachers. Greater consistency in measures of teacher community in the face of teacher turnover implies that the social resources inhering in the relationships among teachers are more robust to instability.

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Family Environments, School Resources, and Educational Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-627-0

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2019

Christopher Redding, Laura Neergaard Booker, Thomas M. Smith and Laura M. Desimone

Administrator support has been identified as a key factor in deterring teacher turnover. Yet, the specific ways school principals directly or indirectly influence teacher

Abstract

Purpose

Administrator support has been identified as a key factor in deterring teacher turnover. Yet, the specific ways school principals directly or indirectly influence teacher retention remain underexamined. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study includes a survival analysis to examine when beginning mathematics teachers turned over and the extent to which teacher quality and administrative support was associated with the turnover, and an analysis of exit surveys explaining teachers’ decision to turn over.

Findings

New teachers with more supportive administrators are less likely to turn over. The influence of administrative support on teacher turnover does not appear to be driven by more supportive administrators improving a school’s professional community, increasing teacher autonomy, or increasing the frequency of professional development and mentoring. While both increased administrative support and teaching quality independently predict reduced turnover, the strength of the association of administrative support on turnover does not appear to be related to the level of teacher quality nor mediated through teacher quality.

Practical implications

Results suggest that the presence of high levels of administrative support are more influential in deterring new teacher turnover than more direct supports, such as the assignment of mentors or recommending professional development.

Originality/value

The use of in-depth data on beginning teachers’ induction supports and teaching quality collected over multiple years shows distinct ways administrators influence new teachers’ decision to remain in their first school.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Timothy G. Ford and Patrick B. Forsyth

The evidence is strong that the instability of teacher rosters in urban school settings has negative consequences for student learning, but our concern is with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The evidence is strong that the instability of teacher rosters in urban school settings has negative consequences for student learning, but our concern is with the opposite phenomenon: What is the value added to the organization when a school's teaching roster is stable over time? Our theory of teacher corps stability hinges on the claim that the stability of a teacher corps over time is a sine qua non that, under certain conditions, permits formation of the social capital needed to catalyze school effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

We test this claim using longitudinal data from 72 schools in a large, urban southwestern US school district. We first identified a subset of 47 schools with either chronic teacher turnover (high, stable turnover) or a stable teacher roster (low, stable turnover) via school-level HLM growth modeling techniques. These classifications were then used as a covariate in a series of HLM growth models investigating its relationship to growth in structural, relational and cognitive social capital over time.

Findings

Our findings sustain a claim of the importance of teacher corps stability. In our sample of urban schools, we found robust increases in the relational and cognitive dimensions of social capital over time in those schools with stable rosters. Furthermore, schools with chronic turnover were declining significantly in relational social capital, but no appreciable growth in structural social capital was found in either stable roster or chronic teacher turnover schools.

Practical implications

Given the nature of teacher corps stability and its relationship to key organizational outcomes, school leaders play a central role in realizing teacher corps stability within their school. A certain amount of this effort must necessarily be focused on retaining a stable corps of quality, happy, committed teachers. However, building social capital concerns the active engagement of all actors; thus, school leaders need to think beyond retention to how the teachers that remain can play larger leadership roles in this process.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the positive benefits that can emerge in schools where the majority of teachers remain year after year. Collectively, the study findings suggest that teacher corps stability can provide fertile conditions for the development of social capital that has the potential to enhance school effectiveness and that its staff can leverage for school improvement.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Takumi Yada, Eija Räikkönen, Kyoko Imai-Matsumura, Hiroshi Shimada, Rihei Koike and Aini-Kristiina Jäppinen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of prosociality, which is defined in terms of helping and benefitting others, between teacher collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating role of prosociality, which is defined in terms of helping and benefitting others, between teacher collaboration and their turnover intentions. Prosociality was measured as prosocial impact and prosocial motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted through a cross-sectional survey of 260 elementary and junior high school teachers in Japan. A structural equational model was employed to examine the mediating roles of prosocial impact and prosocial motivation in the relationships between teacher collaboration and their turnover intention.

Findings

The results, first, supported the hypotheses: the high perception of teacher collaboration in school predicted high perceived prosocial impact; high perceived prosocial impact predicted high perceived prosocial motivation; and high perceived prosocial motivation predicted decreased turnover intention. Second, results supported partial mediating roles of prosocial impact and prosocial motivation between teacher collaboration and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include cross-sectional data that may limit the potential for causal inferences, and self-report data. Future studies should incorporate alternative designs.

Practical implications

Results indicate that teacher collaboration contributes to less teacher turnover intention via prosociality. Thus, to enhance teachers’ prosocial impact, more opportunities to realise their collaboration should be considered.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the relationships between teacher collaboration and turnover intention in educational organisations with prosociality, which resides as core goals and objectives of teachers.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Raminderpreet Kaur and Gurpreet Randhawa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of employee engagement and work–life balance in perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of employee engagement and work–life balance in perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The perception of teachers on the constructs considered has been assessed by a survey using a structured questionnaire. Data were collected from the teachers of private schools of Punjab, India, and 375 were valid number of responses. Parallel multiple mediated regression was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of perceived supervisor support on turnover intentions mediated through employee engagement and work–life balance.

Findings

The results reveal that the effect of perceived supervisor support on turnover intentions is indirect rather than direct. On the comparison of specific indirect effects, the results demonstrate that employee engagement and two dimensions of work–life balance (work interference with personal life and work–personal life enhancement) act as mediators in the perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Practical implications

School principals need to draft teacher-friendly policies for enhancing work–life balance and employee engagement so that teachers can feel satisfied with their work and can handle work and family demands. In this way, positive perceptions associated with high engagement and work–family balance can take place, which in turn can curtail the turnover intentions of teachers.

Originality/value

The use of employee engagement and work-life balance in the relationship of perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions is unprecedented. The study also considered three different dimensions of work–life balance and tested the model in an integrative manner. Since the study is based on an Indian sample, it also adds to growing literature on turnover intentions in nonwestern countries. The results are of great value to school managements, HR managers and policymakers who are seeking to develop practices that reduce employee turnover at workplaces.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Desiree Carver-Thomas and Linda Darling-Hammond

This study uses the most recent national data from the National Center for Education Statistics, Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), 2011–2012 and Teacher Follow-up Survey…

Abstract

This study uses the most recent national data from the National Center for Education Statistics, Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), 2011–2012 and Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS), 2012–2013 to investigate attrition trends among Black teachers, and Black female teachers in particular, to inform a qualitative analysis of proposed and adopted teacher retention policy interventions. This study asks: Why do Black teachers report leaving, and what would bring them back to the classroom? What working conditions are associated with Black teacher attrition? What policy interventions can meet the needs of Black teachers in having successful and supported teaching experiences? How have these interventions been successful, and what are the considerations for applying them more broadly? We find that Black teacher turnover rates are significantly higher than those of other teachers and that there are several substantive differences in their preparation, school characteristics, and reasons for leaving. We describe policy interventions that target these conditions, such as teacher residencies, loan forgiveness, mentoring and induction, and principal training programs. We include in that discussion the relative benefits and challenges of each implications for policymaking.

Details

Black Female Teachers
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-462-0

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Linus Jonathan Vem, Yakubu Ali Mbasua and Makrop Davireng

Sanctification of work research is still a growing area among management and educational guild of researchers. The purpose of this paper is to explore the intervening role…

Abstract

Purpose

Sanctification of work research is still a growing area among management and educational guild of researchers. The purpose of this paper is to explore the intervening role of career satisfaction and affective commitment in the relationship between sanctification and turnover intentions among teachers in a Boko Haram infested region of Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a cross-sectional survey design using 375 responses out of the 600 administered questionnaires to three states within the context of this study. The usable data were analyzed using SmartPLS version 3.2.7 to evaluate the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results reveal: negative but insignificant relationship between sanctification and turnover intention; career satisfaction and affective commitment mediate the relationship between sanctification of work and employee intention to leave.

Originality/value

The predictive role of sanctification was proven to be insignificant under unfriendly work environment, which is contrary to the literature on the role sanctification. The mediating role of career satisfaction and affective commitment between sanctification and turnover intention is relatively new. The two constructs constitute the mechanism through which the relationships are sustained; hence the hypotheses on the indirect relationships are established.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2015

Edward J. Fuller and Lindsey Schrott

Policymakers have focused on improving STEM outcomes for US high school students for over 50 years. Much of this focus has centered on improving the quality of STEM…

Abstract

Policymakers have focused on improving STEM outcomes for US high school students for over 50 years. Much of this focus has centered on improving the quality of STEM teachers, particularly in poor and minority schools. Few, if any, of these efforts have considered the importance of the content knowledge of those providing instructional leadership in schools – namely, principals and assistant principals. This chapter examines the percentage of school leaders with teacher certification in mathematics or science and the degree to which teacher and school leader turnover interrupts the leadership–teacher relationships. The study concludes relatively few school leaders have the content knowledge to provide deep instructional leadership. Moreover, the study finds combined teacher and school leader turnover greatly diminishes the sustained relationships between instructional leaders and teachers, particularly in lower-performing schools.

Details

Promoting and Sustaining a Quality Teacher Workforce
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-016-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Jeevan Jyoti, Roomi Rani and Rupali Gandotra

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion (EE) in between bundled high-performance human resource practices (HPHRPs) and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion (EE) in between bundled high-performance human resource practices (HPHRPs) and intention to leave (ITL) in the education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire method was used to collect data from a sample of 514 teachers working in different professional colleges in Jammu and Kashmir (North India). Data were validated with CFA and SEM was used to test hypothesised relations.

Findings

The results show that bundled HPHRPs have greater impact on EE and ITL as compared to individual HPHRPs. Further, the study also confirmed that EE partially mediates the bundled HPHRPs and ITL relationship.

Research limitations/implications

Future research need to explore same relationships in different sectors with longitudinal data at the multi-level approach.

Practical implications

Educational administration should focus on the bundled HPHRPs, which will benefit not only the teachers, but the students too. It should adopt relaxation techniques like mindfulness training approach, yoga and meditation. Further, to reduce their career-related confusions management should organise career awareness programmes.

Originality/value

The results from this study explored new and untested mechanism, i.e. EE as mediator between bundled HPHRPs and ITL relationship in the professional degree colleges in India, has not been previously researched.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Edward J. Fuller, Liz Hollingworth and Michelle D. Young

This chapter analyzes 2011 survey data from a sample of Texas principals who were asked about their perceptions of their working conditions such as: support and…

Abstract

This chapter analyzes 2011 survey data from a sample of Texas principals who were asked about their perceptions of their working conditions such as: support and facilities; salary; resources; autonomy to make decisions; testing and accountability pressures; and relationships with supervisors. Respondents were also asked about their intentions to stay or leave their particular school. Researchers and policymakers agree effective and stable school leadership is critical to school improvement efforts, but we know little about how various working conditions impact principal effectiveness and turnover. This work is important because in-depth knowledge of the causes of principal turnover in general and how principal working conditions impact turnover in particular is a pre-requisite to creating policies and support mechanisms to support principals in small and mid-sized districts.

Details

Leading Small and Mid-Sized Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-818-2

1 – 10 of over 5000