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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

V. LEO BARTLETT

The Pupil Control Ideology (PCI) concept has been used extensively to describe the school organization. Teachers hate been described as either “custodial” or “humanistic”…

Abstract

The Pupil Control Ideology (PCI) concept has been used extensively to describe the school organization. Teachers hate been described as either “custodial” or “humanistic” in their belief orientation to control of pupils. But clarification of the nature of pupil control and the teacher attitudes which lie at the base of control, has not been investigated adequately. The first section of the present investigation indicates the attitudes of teachers which are associated with high levels of custodialism. These attitudes include emphasis on, content to be taught, teacher direction, rigid classroom procedures and social disengagement from pupils. The second part of the study shows that while operational measures of control may be similar, attitudes underlying control may differ. In schools serving higher socio‐economic communities, teachers exhibit an “emotional disengagement—non‐teacher direction” form of ideology. The conclusion is drawn that unless future investigations both identify attitudes and explain the interactions of attitudes of teachers in each school system, Pupil Control Ideology may be an inadequate descriptor of the school as a social system.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2015

Umesh Sharma and Hasheem Mannan

This chapter discusses Icek Ajzen’s contribution of Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to understandings of teacher attitudes and actions in relation to inclusive…

Abstract

This chapter discusses Icek Ajzen’s contribution of Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to understandings of teacher attitudes and actions in relation to inclusive practices. The discussion explores why some educators are successful in including students with disabilities in regular classrooms and others are not and considers the role of educators’ attitudes in determining their actions when they teach. The chapter proceeds to discuss the role of TPB in teacher education that supports inclusive practices and also identifies some of the drawbacks of the existing research on attitudes within the field of inclusive education. The chapter highlights how TPB theory continues to have significant relevance in a range of areas related to teacher and inclusive education.

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Foundations of Inclusive Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-416-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

KEVIN MARJORIBANKS

Studies which hate examined relations between the organizational orientations of professionals, who work in bureaucracies, and measures of professionalism hate produced…

Abstract

Studies which hate examined relations between the organizational orientations of professionals, who work in bureaucracies, and measures of professionalism hate produced inconsistent and inconclusive findings. The results remain equivocal partly because restricted statistical techniques have been used and because studies have failed to differentiate between the structural and attitudinal components of professionalism. In the present study regression surface analysis was used to investigate relations between the bureaucratic orientations of 230 secondary school teachers and their professional attitudes at different levels of autonomy. The Jackknife technique was used to adjust the significance levels in the analysis. Bureaucratic orientations and autonomy had significant linear and curvilinear relations with attitude measures of ideal of service and dedication to teaching. Although the regression surfaces differed between female and male teachers, they showed that at each level of bureaucratic orientation increases in professional attitudes were associated with increases in the amount of autonomy allowed teachers. That is, bureaucratic orientations and the professional attitudes of teachers need not be in conflict if schools increase the autonomy allowed teachers.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Zeki Arsal

This study aims to examine the effect of critical multicultural education on the multicultural attitudes of preservice teachers in a teacher education program.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of critical multicultural education on the multicultural attitudes of preservice teachers in a teacher education program.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sample consisted of 76 preservice teachers enrolled in a teacher preparation program. This study used a pretest–posttest quasi-experimental research design with pretest-posttest. The multicultural content integration was implemented in an experimental group for one semester, and data were collected using the teacher multicultural attitude survey.

Findings

Analyses indicated that preservice teachers who were exposed to the critical multicultural education program showed significantly greater progress in their multicultural attitudes compared with teachers in the control group. The results of this study indicate that the integrating critical multicultural education content into teacher education program has a positive effect on fostering preservice teachers’ multicultural attitudes.

Practical implications

Teacher education program planners should integrate multicultural content, materials and activities into teaching methods courses to promote change in preservice teachers’ multicultural attitudes.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the multicultural studies on teacher education.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Orly Shapira‐Lishchinsky and Gamal Ishan

This study aims to develop and validate a measure of a specific attitude toward teachers’ absenteeism that predicts this behavior more accurately than other general…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop and validate a measure of a specific attitude toward teachers’ absenteeism that predicts this behavior more accurately than other general measures of job attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 443 teachers from 21 secondary schools in Israel. In the first phase, the teachers answered anonymous questionnaires related to their general attitudes and their specific attitude through “absenteeism acceptance”. In the second phase, each teacher submitted copies of his half‐year absenteeism records six months after the end of the first phase.

Findings

The authors used CFA to cross‐validate the different job attitudes measures. They confirmed the construct validity of “absenteeism acceptance” through convergent and discriminant validity, finding relatively weak negative relationships between “absenteeism acceptance” and the general job attitudes. The criterion validity and predictive validity of the new measure was confirmed by intercorrelations that were found to be relatively stronger between “absenteeism acceptance” and the two measures of absenteeism (frequency, duration) than between the general job attitudes and these two measures. Quasi‐Possion regressions indicated that “absenteeism acceptance” emerges as a better predictor for both of the absenteeism measures than other general job attitudes.

Practical implications

This new measure will benefit schools and principals by allowing them to identify potential absenteeism antecedents and enable early intervention.

Originality/value

Whereas past research on work absence focused primarily on general attitude antecedents, the present study addresses a specific “absenteeism acceptance” measure. This measure can be advantageous in both understanding and predicting voluntary absenteeism more accurately than general attitude measures.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Richard Wiesenthal, Bruce S. Cooper, Ruth Greenblatt and Sheldon Marcus

Research on homework has typically focused on students’ beliefs, commitment to, and benefits of doing homework, but what about the influence of school policies and teachers

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1707

Abstract

Research on homework has typically focused on students’ beliefs, commitment to, and benefits of doing homework, but what about the influence of school policies and teachers’ beliefs and attitudes on the topic? Do schools with stricter rules and a clearer focus have teachers giving more homework? Are teachers who believe in the virtues of homework as a learning device and a convenient means for communicating with the home more likely to give, collect, mark, and return homework to students than teachers who see no benefits? This study developed a valid, reliable instrument, the homework attitude and behaviour inventory for teachers (HABIT), and administered it to 120 teachers in two schools with a clear, focused homework policy, and two without. Findings were that schools with a well‐defined homework policy had teachers who: gave, collected, marked, and returned homework significantly more often; and believed in the usefulness of these assignments. Multiple regressions showed a significant relationship between beliefs about homework, the homework behaviours, and the types of assignments made (repeat classwork, introduce new materials, explore new ideas, pursue imaginative topics at home). Regressing homework attitudes and school policies against teacher homework behaviours produced an adjusted R‐square of 49.5 (p < 0.001).

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2020

Shahar Gindi and Rakefet Erlich Ron

Attitudes toward minority employees are hard to predict, and there is no enough information about the variables that are associated with increased and decreased prejudice…

Abstract

Purpose

Attitudes toward minority employees are hard to predict, and there is no enough information about the variables that are associated with increased and decreased prejudice toward them. The Jewish and Arab education systems in Israel are, for the most part, segregated, which may potentially contribute to prejudice and alienation between the two populations. The integration of Israeli–Arab teachers in Jewish schools has been suggested to reduce prejudice. The current study sought to examine Israeli teachers' attitudes toward the inclusion of Arab teachers in Jewish schools (AJ) and its relation to degree of religiosity, minority status and demographic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,644 teachers completed an online 22-item questionnaire that surveyed background variables such as gender, mother tongue, seniority and degree of religiosity, the two independent variables, religiosity and minority status, and the dependent variable, attitude toward the inclusion of AJ.

Findings

Overall, teachers exhibited positive attitudes toward the integration of AJ. Multiple linear regression indicated that among Jewish teachers, the degree of religiosity was the strongest predictor of the teachers' attitudes toward inclusion but was a poor predictor among Arabs. Conversely, minority status was the strongest predictor among Arab teachers but was a poor predictor among Israeli Jews. Not only did religiosity differ in its prediction of attitudes among Arabs and Jews but also the patterns of religiosity were quite different among these two groups.

Research limitations/implications

While the overall sample was wide, the specific minority groups that were examined were small and did not allow deep exploration of minority nuances. The study's generalizability is hampered by the given exceptionality of the Israeli context, where “Church” and State are not separated. Religiosity was examined in a unidimensional way and failed to explore other related factors that may be relevant, such as political inclination.

Practical implications

The study further refutes the notion of commonality among minorities. It proposes to place more emphasis on religion's role in attitudes toward minority employees. Further research into the role of religiosity in Israeli Jews' attitudes toward Arabs is needed.

Social implications

The findings suggest that the degree of religiosity might be a central factor in Israeli Jews' attitudes toward the Arab minority in general.

Originality/value

The research calls attention to the association of Judaism and nationalism as well as segregation, contributing to negative attitudes and prejudice toward the Arab minority. Unlike previous research using contact theory, the authors call attention to the importance of examining willingness to make contact prior to examining the impact of contact itself.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Po Tsai and Panayiotis Antoniou

This paper aims to describe the findings of a study investigating the relationships between teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, teacher self-efficacy, student…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the findings of a study investigating the relationships between teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, teacher self-efficacy, student achievement and teacher job satisfaction in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 110 fifth grade primary school teachers and their students (n = 2,334) between 10 and 10 years old. A teacher questionnaire and a criterion-reference test in mathematics were distributed during the academic year 2016–2017. The data were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and stepwise linear regression.

Findings

The results revealed that teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics, efficacy in classroom environment and student achievement in mathematics could, to some extent, explain variations in teacher job satisfaction. Of all the variables, teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics explained the largest portion of the variance in teacher job satisfaction.

Originality/value

These findings support the proposition that teacher attitudes to teaching mathematics affect teacher job satisfaction, which is in turn, translatable into enhanced teacher effectiveness. It is important to note that this study explores the impact of student achievement on teacher job satisfaction (and not the other way round), which is a relationship that remains under-researched and needs further investigation. Implications of the findings are discussed, and suggestions for further studies are provided.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Sarah Copfer and Jacqueline Specht

This chapter will provide an overview of the types of concerns that are evident in the research literature regarding how well teachers are prepared to teach in inclusive…

Abstract

This chapter will provide an overview of the types of concerns that are evident in the research literature regarding how well teachers are prepared to teach in inclusive classrooms citing both preservice education and in-service professional development/learning. It will present an overview of the measurements that have been used to measure teachers’ perceptions of preparedness for inclusive environments and the use of surveys to assess attitudes, beliefs, and values. The chapter will conclude with a discussion regarding measuring teachers’ perceptions to inform/improve teacher preparation efforts/policies/practices and what needs to be done to improve teacher preparation for inclusive education.

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Measuring Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-146-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Raymond L. Calabrese, Sherry Goodvin and Rae Niles

To identify the attitudes and traits of teachers with an at‐risk student population in a multi‐cultural urban high school.

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1940

Abstract

Purpose

To identify the attitudes and traits of teachers with an at‐risk student population in a multi‐cultural urban high school.

Design/methodology/approach

A research team consisting of doctoral students and their faculty advisor used an appreciative inquiry model to identify attitudes and traits of teachers who supported effective teaching in an urban high school with a high at‐risk student population.

Findings

The research team's findings indicate that those perceived as effective teachers were culturally responsive, sought small successes, encouraged students, flexible, and caring. They also formed meaningful relationships with students, had caring attitudes, and viewed themselves as difference‐makers. The research team also found a number of non‐supportive teacher attitudes and traits: blaming, racial attitudes, frustration leading to inflexibility, co‐dependency leading to encouraging the neediness of students, and lack of respect for the contributions made by the surrounding community and parents.

Originality/value

Teachers, administrators, and counselors agreed that forming relationships and caring for students were at the core of the attitudes and traits of effective teaching. Moreover, teachers with effective attitudes and traits were seen as having the ability to integrate into the school and surrounding community's culture to encourage students to succeed in school.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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