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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Joan Enric Ricart, Miguel Ángel Rodríguez and Pablo Sánchez

Although an extensive body of research treats the fields of corporate governance and sustainable development separately, less attention has been paid to the interaction

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3741

Abstract

Purpose

Although an extensive body of research treats the fields of corporate governance and sustainable development separately, less attention has been paid to the interaction between both fields. This paper attempts to bridge this gap by examining how corporate governance systems are evolving in order to integrate sustainable development thinking into them.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from corporate governance, sustainable development, and stakeholder theory literature, an analysis is performed of the governance systems of the 18 corporations that are leading the market sectors considered by the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index.

Findings

The results of our in‐depth analysis of the 18 cases are presented and the sustainable corporate governance model that emerges from that analysis is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

This model does not attempt to question or replace the previous recommendation and frameworks suggested in the literature on corporate governance and codes of governance. On the contrary, the model should be viewed as a way of integrating sustainable development/corporate responsibility into the fabric of already existing governance models suggested elsewhere.

Originality/value

The suggested model seems to be a good framework both for managers and for researchers because it can be used to improve the firm's governance systems as well as a guide for future research on sustainable corporate governance.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2018

Hedda Ofoole Knoll and Sarah Margaretha Jastram

This paper aims to highlight the challenges and opportunities of sustainable global value chain governance, it demonstrates strong theoretical deficits in this field and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the challenges and opportunities of sustainable global value chain governance, it demonstrates strong theoretical deficits in this field and offers new pragmatist conceptual perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on document analyses, 47 expert interviews and on field observations in Ghana, Africa.

Findings

Based on an in-depth analysis of a US firm operating a fair trade value chain in an intercultural environment, the authors show that universalistic value chain-oriented governance instruments often fail because of strong institutional and cultural distances. Against the prevailing strategies of top-down management, the authors suggest a more bottom-up, pragmatist and collaboration-based approach to sustainable global value chain governance.

Research limitations/implications

The results of an in-depth case study are not generalizable. Instead, they provide holistic insights into a so-far insufficiently examined field and an empirical fundament for further research on sustainable governance in global value chains. In particular, research on pragmatist, collaborative, dialogue based, bottom-up approaches of sustainable value chain governance will be of great value to further theoretical development of this field.

Practical implications

This study is relevant to researchers and practitioners in the field of sustainable value chain governance. It reveals several misunderstandings about the effectiveness and impacts of sustainable governance in less developed countries and thus builds a foundation for better and more effective problem-solving approaches in international sustainable management activities.

Social implications

Nontransparent supplier networks and (illegal) sub-contracting, as well as the strong influences of institutional, cultural and sub-cultural factors, make responsible value chain management a challenging task for any firm with international value creation activities. This leaves workers in local factories vulnerable to infringements of their fundamental human rights and the environment unprotected against long-lasting damages. Addressing these challenges and developing new solutions, therefore, can have strong impacts on the lives of workers in international supply chains.

Originality/value

The authors contribute, first, a differentiated empirical description and analysis of a sustainable value chain approach in a less developed country in Africa. Second, using an example of the field study, the authors highlight limitations of value chain-related governance theory based on a field study by illustrating the challenges and barriers and a lack of existing concepts concerning effective sustainable governance in global value chains. Third, the authors show different managerial responses to these cultural and institutional challenges between universalism and relativism, and, fourth, the authors suggest a more collaborative, bottom-up and pragmatist approach to sustainable value chain governance.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Agnieszka Sobol

This paper seeks to review multidimensional aspects of local sustainable development policy in the context of governance. It aims to focus on the general conditions in…

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1532

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to review multidimensional aspects of local sustainable development policy in the context of governance. It aims to focus on the general conditions in Poland and to base its analysis on empirical research in selected Polish communities.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first theoretical part the paper presents multidimensional aspects of governance for local sustainability. Identified barriers are the analyzed, based on case studies of local communities.

Findings

The paper shows that even if sustainable development and governance are integrated in theoretical discourses, in the practice of local policy making they are rarely considered in conjunction with each other. A lack of understanding of the importance of governance for sustainability and for local development has been identified on the practical level of local policy making. The Polish case studies show that the responsibility for governance barriers to local sustainable development is shared by local decision‐makers and local societies.

Practical implications

Creation of partnership and dialogue between the local community and government is believed to be of critical importance for local sustainable development. The relationship between local government and society can greatly enhance or obstruct sustainable development initiatives. The change towards local sustainable development requires more open and transparent decision‐making procedures that promote participation by a wide range of stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper is another voice in the debate on governance for local sustainable development. Based on empirical examination it shows the issue of governance barriers for local sustainable development from a Polish local perspective.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2017

Amir Rahdari

Corporate governance has experienced numerous changes in chime with the exigencies of the time during which it has been introduced or the context in which it has been…

Abstract

Corporate governance has experienced numerous changes in chime with the exigencies of the time during which it has been introduced or the context in which it has been practiced. Its gestation can be divided into three stages of development namely the traditional governance, the current transitional governance, and the upcoming sustainable governance. Traditional governance refers to the period hitherto the industrial revolution when corporations have not yet been formed, in today’s sense, but the governance structures were already in place in the existing entities at the time. Transitional governance refers to a period between the industrial revolution and the information age when corporations started to rise as a new economic entity. Reviewing the dominant corporate governance models are integral to understanding the transitional era. At the end of the transitional governance era, a transmogrification in corporate governance is underway to prepare itself for the coming age of sustainability. Sustainable governance integrates the principles of systems thinking and appreciates the complexity of decision-making environment, contrary to its former iterations that welcomed oversimplification of interactive messes (systems of problems). The objective of this chapter is to review corporate governance developmental transition toward sustainable governance and its role in the age of sustainability.

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Juma Bananuka, Zainabu Tumwebaze and Doreen Musimenta

This study aims to examine whether energy governance mechanisms, energy consumption, energy poverty and firm characteristics do matter for sustainable development practices.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether energy governance mechanisms, energy consumption, energy poverty and firm characteristics do matter for sustainable development practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a cross-sectional survey of production managers, engineers and chief finance officers of firms under the Uganda Manufacturers Association. The data analysis was mainly done using the partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The regression analysis results indicate that ownership structure, capital structure, energy governance mechanisms, energy poverty and energy consumption do matter for improved sustainable development practices. Firm age does not significantly matter for sustainable development practices.

Originality/value

This study provides initial evidence on what matters for improvement in sustainable development practices using evidence from developing African countries such as Uganda whose major focus is the attraction of foreign investors. Such countries focus on improvement in economic growth at the expense of social and environmental concerns.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Valdir de Jesus Lameira, Jean Harris, Osvaldo Luiz Gonçalves Quelhas and Roberto G. Pereira

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, for some countries, the nature of relationships among three variables: the character of governance, the potential for…

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788

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, for some countries, the nature of relationships among three variables: the character of governance, the potential for sustainable growth and the quality of energy management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on a sample of data drawn from a database available from the World Bank. This database provides CO2 emissions and other environmental measures for 54 countries for the period 2000 to 2008. The character of governance was measured by using an indicator of character of governance constructed by Transparency International. Data were analyzed by applying the method of linear regression with panel data after the method of structural equations had been applied in a test of robustness.

Findings

The results of the analysis showed the existence of statistically significant relationships among character of governance, potential for sustainable growth and quality of energy management.

Originality/value

The results of this investigation allow for the inclusion of character of governance as a new and relevant variable in the search to understand the ways that efficient energy management may contribute to increasing opportunities for sustainable growth and development in countries.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Bo Enquist, Mikael Johnson and Carolina Camén

What is contractual governance in a scenario of performance management? When approached from a static viewpoint, contracting is largely connected with the securing of…

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1394

Abstract

What is contractual governance in a scenario of performance management? When approached from a static viewpoint, contracting is largely connected with the securing of resources, thus acquiring a capacity focus. In this article, we focus on contractual governance as a part of performance management for a stakeholder network in a specific, government‐controlled context: Public Transport. In order to contribute to more dynamic and sustainable public service, a more process‐oriented approach to contractual governance is necessary. Public Transportation in Sweden has undergone an initial wave of development, the production paradigm, and is now undergoing what is more a second wave of service, the service paradigm. A third wave of development is approaching: sustainability. We argue that contractual governance creates a more dynamic contractual relationship as a key element of performance management leading to more sustainable public service. We also argue that a proactive approach during the mission will positively affect all the stakeholders involved.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2012

Corinna Altenburg

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to review the relationship of urban climate governance against the background of sustainability and to identify driving forces in a…

Abstract

Purpose – The aim of this chapter is to review the relationship of urban climate governance against the background of sustainability and to identify driving forces in a set of leading cities in the United States and Europe.

Design/methodology/approach – Case-study research indicates that efficient, creative and participatory urban governance is key for the quest for sustainability. It is theorized that dynamic governance is composed of high levels of both institutional and social capital or capacity. Each capacity category is composed of different indicators or ‘success factors’ taken from qualitative data in overall 84 cities in the United States and Europe. By triangulating desktop research, mail surveys and review of existing studies, the role and influence of these success factors is evaluated and compared.

Findings – In both the United States and in Europe, the key driving forces are those related to institutional capacity. Yet, cities tend to be more successful in sustainable development if levels of institutional and social capacity are high. Linkages between institutional and social dimensions can be successfully strengthened by capacity building measures.

Research limitations/implications – As the comparison is based on existing studies on leading cities in sustainability, driving factors likely to play a stronger role in the early phase of urban sustainability measures are underrepresented.

Practical implications – Local authorities are advised to encourage social capacities in order to help them pursue local sustainability over time.

Originality/value – This chapter compares and evaluates underlying success factors going beyond a case-study approach across the Atlantic in order to draw broader conclusions.

Details

Urban Areas and Global Climate Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-037-6

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2021

Loai Ali Zeenalabden Ali Alsaid

This study seeks to explore the powerful role(s) of institutionalised performance measurement systems or metrics in smart city governance in a politically and militarily…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the powerful role(s) of institutionalised performance measurement systems or metrics in smart city governance in a politically and militarily sensitive developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

This study extends the application and contribution of a multi-level institutional framework to previous management accounting literature on the potential relationship between performance measurement and smart city governance. The value of utilising a multi-level framework is to broaden and deepen theoretical analyses about this relationship to include the effect of political pressure from the military regime at the macro level on the institutionalisation of a performance measurement system at the micro-organisational level. Taking the New Cairo city council smart electricity networks project (Egypt) as an interpretive qualitative single-case study, data collection methods included semi-structured interviews, direct observations and documentary readings.

Findings

Performance measurement systems or metrics, especially in politically and militarily sensitive smart cities, constitutes a process of cascading (macro-micro) institutionalisation that is closely linked to sustainable developments taking place in the wider arena of urban policies. Going a step further, accounting-based performance metrics, arising from political and military pressures towards public-private collaborations, contribute to smart city management and accountability (governance). Institutionalised measurement systems or performance metrics play a powerful accounting role(s) in shaping and reshaping political decisions and military actions in the city council.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this study goes beyond the cascading institutionalisation process by arguing for the powerful role(s) of institutionalised accounting and performance measurement systems in smart city decision-making and governance. Empirically, it enriches previous literature with a case study of a developing Arab Spring country, characterised by an emerging economy, political sensitivity and military engagement, rather than developed and more stable countries that have been thoroughly investigated. It is also among the first politically engaged accounting case studies to highlight public-private collaborations as a recent reform in public sector governance and accountability.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Wenbin Ni and Hongyi Sun

Literature proposes that implementing supplier assessment and supplier collaboration simultaneously may lead to better sustainable performance. The purpose of this paper…

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1068

Abstract

Purpose

Literature proposes that implementing supplier assessment and supplier collaboration simultaneously may lead to better sustainable performance. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the proposition by considering the contingent effects of two contextual factors, the environmental dynamism and the stakeholder pressure on sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Four configurations of governance mechanisms are identified according to the different levels of implementing supplier assessment and supplier collaboration. The performances of the four configurations are compared against the levels of environmental dynamism and stakeholder pressure. The empirical data from the sixth round of International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) are used.

Findings

This paper found that the governance configuration with the highest level of implementing both governance mechanisms leads to the best performance. The synergistic effect that supplier assessment and collaboration complement each other to achieve better performance is verified. However, the synergistic effect holds robust only when the environmental dynamism and stakeholder pressure are high. The synergistic effect vanishes in the social and environmental performance when the environmental dynamism is low. The effect also vanishes in the environmental performance when the stakeholder pressure is low. No synergistic effect was found in business performance.

Originality/value

This paper reveals the complementarity between supplier assessment and supplier collaboration when they are implemented at a reasonably high level. It also reveals the importance of the fit of governance mechanisms under different external contexts. The results contribute to reconciling the disputes about the effectiveness of governing supplier relationship to achieve the sustainability along a supply chain.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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