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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2011

Graham Currie and Alexa Delbosc

Purpose — This chapter provides an overview of the sampling outcomes of the field surveys. This includes a description of the samples from the VISTA Follow-On survey and…

Abstract

Purpose — This chapter provides an overview of the sampling outcomes of the field surveys. This includes a description of the samples from the VISTA Follow-On survey and the Special survey covering both Metropolitan Melbourne and the Latrobe Regional Samples. Analysis includes an assessment of the coverage of the samples plus a discussion of the rationale and outcomes for improved sample coverage from the Special survey.

Methodology — The methodology adopted concerns the quantitative statistical analysis of survey sample coverage and cross tabulation of these findings from statistics on the population being sampled.

Findings — The Vista Follow-On survey approach was an effective means of targeting households for survey and also reduced the number of questions required. However, the resulting sample had low coverage of extremely disadvantaged groups. An adjustment to the survey quotas and a new recruitment method termed the Special survey were implemented to address this issue. This proved effective in obtaining a more balanced sample.

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New Perspectives and Methods in Transport and Social Exclusion Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-052200-5

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Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

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Transport Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78-190288-2

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2006

Patrick Bonnel and Jean-Loup Madre

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Travel Survey Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044662-2

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Transport Survey Quality and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044096-5

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

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Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Andrew W. Stevens

The purpose of this article is to document and evaluate patterns of nontraditional credit use among Wisconsin dairy farmers. Using a survey-based case study approach, this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to document and evaluate patterns of nontraditional credit use among Wisconsin dairy farmers. Using a survey-based case study approach, this article analyzes farmer and farm characteristics, farmers’ utilization of credit and farmers’ perceptions of nontraditional lenders. The findings are connected to ongoing structural change in the dairy sector and economic theories of trade credit.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using an incentivized online survey of Wisconsin dairy farmers distributed through existing university and industry networks. A total of 16 farmers completed the survey. The sample is treated as a focus group case study, and participants’ responses are examined using summary statistics and correlational analyses to describe emergent patterns in the industry.

Findings

Among survey respondents who utilize agricultural credit, nearly 80% (11 of 14) borrow from at least one nontraditional lender, and nontraditional credit comprises 17% of their total borrowing, on average. Much of this borrowing occurs through the financial arm of a vendor and is used to finance equipment or machinery purchases. Despite widespread use of nontraditional credit, no surveyed farmers preferred nontraditional lenders over traditional lenders.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyze the use of nontraditional credit specifically among Wisconsin dairy farmers. Dairy farming is a capital-intensive endeavor, and recent structural change in the sector has increased surviving dairy farmers' demand for credit.

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Agricultural Finance Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Robert J. Bonometti and Jun Tang

Business research often requires use of survey‐based techniques for data acquisition. In the past, researchers had to rely on manual methodologies for survey distribution…

Abstract

Business research often requires use of survey‐based techniques for data acquisition. In the past, researchers had to rely on manual methodologies for survey distribution, data entry, and analysis. These approaches were generally characterized by uncertain (often low) response rates; batch processing of collected data; protracted time periods spanning survey distribution to processed statistical results; and inability to make “mid‐course corrections”. These deficiencies are exacerbated for research on global competitiveness issues which requires international data gathering activities; however, they can be mitigated, if not completely eliminated, by the use of dynamic web‐based survey methods. This paper discusses the advantages of web‐based survey technologies with direct back‐end database interfaces and analytical frameworks, and presents illustrative results from development and use of such a tool.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Mike Hoxley

Many facilities management professionals originally graduated from a building surveying course. The high referral rate of the professional body pre‐qualification…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many facilities management professionals originally graduated from a building surveying course. The high referral rate of the professional body pre‐qualification assessment process for building surveyors and other criticisms of graduates have led many to question whether building surveying education is fit for purpose. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous research on this subject has concentrated on obtaining the views of course providers and employers. The approach adopted for this study has been an on‐line survey of recent UK building surveying graduates. A 30 per cent response rate resulted in 806 graduates undertaking the survey.

Findings

Most graduates had studied a full‐time undergraduate course, three‐quarters had gained some form of placement or work‐experience during their studies, the mode of the year of graduation was 2004 and 65 per cent of the sample work in private practice. The survey reveals concerns over non‐coverage of some of the professional body's pre‐qualification competencies. The most useful subjects studied by graduates were construction technology and building pathology and the least useful was economics. The top two omitted subjects from courses were contract administration and dilapidations – both core areas of work. Skills development was weaker on postgraduate than undergraduate courses.

Practical implications

Those designing HE building surveying courses can refer to the results of this study to ensure that their curricula remain relevant and current to the needs of industry.

Originality/value

This study into building surveying education has been undertaken at a time when many UK universities are reviewing their course provision to ensure that they are well placed to survive the massive upheaval imposed by government funding cuts and changes in student finance. This study with its large sample size will be of assistance to those reviewing building surveying courses.

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Facilities, vol. 30 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Jayne Beresford and Anita Sarris

Ordnance Survey was established in 1791 as a paper map maker for Britain's Armed Forces. Two hundred and nineteen years on, it has evolved to a high‐tech geographic data…

Abstract

Purpose

Ordnance Survey was established in 1791 as a paper map maker for Britain's Armed Forces. Two hundred and nineteen years on, it has evolved to a high‐tech geographic data specialist, and the impact of this on its culture, identity and vision has been massive. In 2008 Ordnance Survey found itself struggling to recruit and retain in technology and commercial fields. It also saw great challenges in motivating staff and bringing together a number of subcultures that had developed over time. This paper aims to investigate this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

It was critical to understand the current employer brand strengths and weaknesses, how Ordnance Survey is perceived externally, what it is like in reality, and its vision. This was achieved through solid research conducted internally and externally, including focus groups with existing staff, depth interviews with senior management and consultation with recruitment consultants, short‐service leavers and recent joiners.

Findings

The research highlighted some widely known strengths of Ordnance Survey, including its strong proud history, its flexibility and adaptability as an employer and the supportive working environment it offers. Some less well‐known attributes were also drawn out, including the innovative nature of the organization, its dynamic technology and the opportunity for staff to really make a difference.

Originality/value

This research led to the development of a compelling set of values which will inform how Ordnance Survey markets itself externally and interacts with employees, leading to better retention of skills, greater alignment with the vision and a strong reputation as a great employer.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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