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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

William L. Bahr

The purpose of this article is to provide librarians (and their patrons) with a quick method for finding United States Supreme Court cases in varied sources, including in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to provide librarians (and their patrons) with a quick method for finding United States Supreme Court cases in varied sources, including in databases and on internet web sites.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to provide librarians (and their patrons) with a quick method for finding Supreme Court cases, the article will explain case citations and case names. In addition, the article will provide varied sources for finding a case on a particular topic, for finding a major Supreme Court case – by case name or by topic – and for finding current Supreme Court cases.

Findings

In 1989, a guide that offered a quick method of finding Supreme Court cases appeared in Reference Services Review. However, since the article's inception, numerous sources, including databases and internet web sites, have come into existence. As such, an update of varied sources for quickly finding Supreme Court cases is needed.

Practical implications

The article is a useful resource for librarians (and their patrons) to quickly find Supreme Court cases.

Originality/value

The strategies and ideas presented in the article will provide librarians (and their patrons) with the means to quickly find Supreme Court cases.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2008

Ronald Kahn

Legalists and social scientists have not been able to explain the expansion of gay rights in a conservative age because they refuse to respect the special qualities of…

Abstract

Legalists and social scientists have not been able to explain the expansion of gay rights in a conservative age because they refuse to respect the special qualities of judicial decision making. These qualities require the Supreme Court to look simultaneously at the past, present, and future, and, most importantly, to determine questions of individual rights through a consideration of how citizens are to live under a continuing rights regime. Unless scholars understand how and why Supreme Court decision making differs from that of more directly politically accountable institutions we can expect no greater success in explaining or predicting individual rights in the future.

Details

Special Issue Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1486-7

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2008

David A. Yalof

The premise that the U.S. Supreme Court never veers too far off from the dominant national political coalition (Dahl, 1957) has become widely accepted among social…

Abstract

The premise that the U.S. Supreme Court never veers too far off from the dominant national political coalition (Dahl, 1957) has become widely accepted among social scientists today. To fulfill that promise, however, the confirmation process for justices must serve as a plebiscite through which the public can ratify or reject future justices based on their views. Unfortunately, modern confirmation hearings have become an exercise in obfuscation, providing little meaningful dialogue on important issues. Because conservative Republican presidents have made the lion's share of appointments in recent times, social conservatives have most often benefited from a process that has severed the link between Supreme Court nominees and the polity they must serve.

Details

Special Issue Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1486-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

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Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2013

Amanda Hollis-Brusky

This chapter examines the influence of the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy on some of the most important Supreme Court decisions of the past three decades…

Abstract

This chapter examines the influence of the Federalist Society for Law and Public Policy on some of the most important Supreme Court decisions of the past three decades. Mobilizing the epistemic community framework, it demonstrates how network members, acting as amici curiae, litigators, academics, and judges worked to transmit intellectual capital to Supreme Court decision makers in 12 federalism and separation of powers cases decided between 1983 and 2001. It finds that Federalist Society members were most successful in diffusing ideas into Supreme Court opinions in cases where doctrinal distance was greatest; that is, cases where the Supreme Court moved the farthest from its established constitutional framework.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-620-0

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Sirajo Yakubu

The purpose of this paper is to show how fighting financial crime suffered a setback in Nigeria as a result of the Supreme Court ruling in an appeal case – Ude Jones…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how fighting financial crime suffered a setback in Nigeria as a result of the Supreme Court ruling in an appeal case – Ude Jones Udeogu v FRN and Ors no SC. 622C/2019.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a critical analysis of the implication of Supreme Courts’ ruling in Ude Udeogu Jones, its implication to law enforcement’s effort in fighting financial crime and the way to get around the ruling. The paper adopts qualitative methods. It is conducted through the analysis of the ruling and the relevant laws.

Findings

Due to the ruling in UdeUdeogu Jones, Section 396(7) of the Administration of Criminal Justice Act 2015 is no longer good law. Federal High Court judges elevated to the Court of Appeal no longer have special dispensation to conclude criminal cases they part heard. Furthermore, the ruling is a serious setback on the law enforcement’s efforts in fighting corruption. However, the drastic effect of the ruling can be mitigated by amending Section 396(7).

Research limitations/implications

Because the ruling is very recent, analysis is based on the relevant enactments and case laws including recent decisions of the Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court.

Originality/value

There is no comprehensive work on this ruling. Therefore, this paper adds value to knowledge as it makes clear the background of the appeal case, as well as the impact of the ruling of the Supreme Court on fighting financial crime in Nigeria and the way to get around the ruling.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Abstract

Details

Documents from the History of Economic Thought
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1423-2

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Christiane Wilke

In a series of mid-20th century cases, the U.S. Supreme Court has modified and diversified the status of the enemy in U.S. law. We see a shift away from the statist…

Abstract

In a series of mid-20th century cases, the U.S. Supreme Court has modified and diversified the status of the enemy in U.S. law. We see a shift away from the statist egalitarian model toward a transnationalized model of enemies. U.S. Supreme Court decisions in three clusters of cases (German enemy aliens, the internment of the West Coast Japanese Americans, and Communist) from the 1940s and 1950s prefigure the radicalized post-9/11 “enemy combatant” status. The choice for such enemy conceptions is both a result of and a contribution to the changes in contemporary practices of violence.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1324-2

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Abstract

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Philosophy, Politics, and Austrian Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-405-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2006

Henry Cohen and Mary Minow

This chapter compares the status of intellectual freedom in libraries “then” (1970s) and “now” (2005). As starting points for comparisons, it uses two Advances in

Abstract

This chapter compares the status of intellectual freedom in libraries “then” (1970s) and “now” (2005). As starting points for comparisons, it uses two Advances in Librarianship chapters, by Edwin Castagna (Castagna, 1971) and David K. Berninghausen (Berninghausen, 1979), respectively. The US Supreme Court, although somewhat ducking the direct question of library censorship in a school library case in 1982, has consistently upheld intellectual freedom, even in the face of an onslaught of federal laws passed by Congress to restrict speech. The high-water mark came in 1997 when the American Library Association joined the American Civil Liberties Union and others to challenge the Communications Decency Act of 1996, which would have prohibited “indecent” speech on the Internet, an undefined term that could have swept away vast quantities of speech. In 2003, however, the Supreme Court ruled against libraries when it held that a narrower law, the Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA) is constitutional. This law requires libraries and schools that receive specified federal funds and discounts to use “technology protection measures” to block obscenity, child pornography, and material “harmful to minors.” This chapter looks at these and related cases, as well as the library profession's evolving ethical and political stance on intellectual freedom issues.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-007-4

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