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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Tracy Taylor and Peter McGraw

In order to assess the current usage of succession management programs in Australian‐based organizations, and gain information on the characteristics and perceived…

Abstract

In order to assess the current usage of succession management programs in Australian‐based organizations, and gain information on the characteristics and perceived effectiveness of such programs, a national research study was undertaken. A total of 711 human resource management professionals from a range of organizations across the country answered the questionnaire, a response rate of 59 percent. Succession management programs were present in less than half of the respondent's organizations. Furthermore, these programs were generally less than five years old. The prime imperatives for introducing succession management programs were reported as the desire to improve business results, and the need for new skill requirements in the business. A relationship between organization size, industry and type and the likelihood to use succession management was found. Common perceptions concerning the characteristics of effective succession management programs were also identified and are described in the paper. In brief, these are: high level involvement by the chief executive officer; senior management support; line management involvement in identifying candidates; developmental assignments as part of the process; and succession management linked to business strategies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Jerry D. VanVactor

– The purpose of this paper is to present practicing management professionals with a model related to succession management and planning.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present practicing management professionals with a model related to succession management and planning.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a review of existent literature, this work examines and expounds upon the impact of succession management and planning as a potential genesis of, and an opportunity to mitigate, organizational problems related to senior executive turnover.

Findings

This manuscript presents a succession management and planning model for practicing professionals that is based on three key tenets: first, a plan (of some sort) is necessary for corporate resilience and sustainability; second, an organization has in inherent responsibility and need to plan for replacements and prioritize allocation of resources; and third, succession management planning aids in the establishment of organizational resilience and stability amid contingencies.

Practical implications

This work examines how, ultimately, succession management and planning is a means to risk/crisis management aimed at reducing gaps and associated problems related to changes among human capital distribution.

Social implications

While this work is written with emphasis placed upon managing transition among healthcare organizations and personnel, the information is equally relevant and applicable to a broader audience. In an applied sense, this model provides management professionals with concepts related to orchestrating change at both the individual and organizational levels.

Originality/value

While there is a dearth of literature examining succession management in a variety of industries, little information is directed specifically toward healthcare. This manuscript provides concepts related to effective risk mitigation via defined succession management and planning.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Louise Scholes, Paul Westhead and Andrew Burrows

This exploratory study aims to provide fresh insights into the ownership transfer of private family firms through internal management buy‐out (MBO) and external management

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to provide fresh insights into the ownership transfer of private family firms through internal management buy‐out (MBO) and external management buy‐in (MBI) succession routes. The paper aims to explore if flows of information impact the succession planning process and if the nature of succession planning impacts the business sale negotiation process relating to family firms that select MBO/MBI succession routes.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by insights from agency theory and theories relating to information asymmetries and negotiation behaviour six hypotheses were derived. Private family firms that had received venture capital and the MBO/I deals had been completed between 1994 and 2003 were identified. A structured survey was administered to 117 senior members of acquiring MBO/I management teams after the deal had been completed in several European countries. Non‐parametric chi‐square tests and Mann‐Whitney “U” tests were used to test the presented hypotheses.

Findings

Evidence highlights the importance of information sharing and that the family owner(s) may not always be in the strongest position. MBOs reported lower information asymmetry. Also, lower information asymmetry was reported when vendors and management were involved in succession planning. Internal managers with greater access to information were found to influence the negotiation process and determine who is more likely to benefit from the price to be paid for the firm. A mutually agreed price was less likely when management controlled information and when personal equity providers (PEP) were involved in the process supporting the interests of the MBO/I team.

Practical implications

Family firm owners need to plan for succession planning. Vendors of family firms need to leverage external professional advice when negotiating the sale of their ventures to ensure “family agendas” are protected.

Originality/value

This study has extended the conceptual work of Howorth et al. surrounding the succession of family firms through MBOs and MBIs. Rather than relying on case study evidence alone, cross‐sectional survey evidence was explored within a univariate statistical framework to explore gaps in the knowledge base relating to succession planning and business sale negotiation behaviour.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

S. Robert Hernandez, Cynthia Carter Haddock, William M. Behrendt and Walter F. Klein

In this article a definition of “succession planning”is given, outlining the potential benefits and problems of implementinga succession‐planning programme in a health…

Abstract

In this article a definition of “succession planning” is given, outlining the potential benefits and problems of implementing a succession‐planning programme in a health service organisation, and factors critical for the success of such a programme are discussed. A case study is presented of one large health service organisation which recently implemented a succession‐planning programme. In this case study, a brief overview is given of the organisational setting, the philosophy and objectives of the programme are outlined and the programme′s implementation and early outcomes are described.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Sally J. Zepeda, Ed Bengtson and Oksana Parylo

The purpose of this study is to examine principal succession planning and management by analyzing current practices of handling school leader succession in four Georgia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine principal succession planning and management by analyzing current practices of handling school leader succession in four Georgia school systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Looking through the lens of organizational leadership succession theory, the practices of school systems as they experienced changes in school leadership were examined. Participants included superintendents, assistant superintendents, other central office leaders, and principals. A multiple‐case approach was selected with semi‐structured interviews providing the major source of data.

Findings

Findings suggest the following: there is a difference in the sense of urgency for the planning and management of the succession of principals; the development of aspiring leaders was identified as a critical component of planning and management of succession; mentoring was an essential practice through the succession process; and reliance on collaborative partnerships with outside organizations was highly valued.

Practical implications

The implications of the study include a call for further research to determine the differences in leader succession planning and management needs related to the varying contexts. In addition, the study implies that building collaborative partnerships with university preparation programs and other external professional development organizations may assist systems in the planning and management of principal succession.

Originality/value

The originality of this study stems from the lack of literature that directly examines the experiences and practices of principal succession. The findings can inform school system leaders of succession planning and management issues and practices that exist in the four systems studied. As leadership becomes more recognized for its impact on student achievement and school performance, it is imperative that succession is managed and planned to ensure sustainability and effectiveness.

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2015

William H. Weare

It has been widely projected in the library literature that a substantial number of librarians will retire in the near future leaving significant gaps in the workforce…

Abstract

It has been widely projected in the library literature that a substantial number of librarians will retire in the near future leaving significant gaps in the workforce, especially in library leadership. Many of those concerned with organizational development in libraries have promoted succession planning as an essential tool for addressing this much-anticipated wave of retirements. The purpose of this chapter is to argue that succession planning is the wrong approach for academic libraries. This chapter provides a review of the library literature on succession planning, as well as studies analyzing position announcements in librarianship which provide evidence as to the extent to which academic librarianship has changed in recent years. In a review of the library literature, the author found no sound explanation of why succession planning is an appropriate method for filling anticipated vacancies and no substantive evidence that succession planning programs in libraries are successful. Rather than filling anticipated vacancies with librarians prepared to fill specific positions by means of a succession planning program, the author recommends that academic library leaders should focus on the continual evaluation of current library needs and future library goals, and treat each vacancy as an opportunity to create a new position that will best satisfy the strategic goals of the library. In contrast to the nearly universal support for succession planning found in the library literature, this chapter offers a different point of view.

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Veland Ramadani, Robert D. Hisrich, Grisna Anggadwita and Dini Turipanam Alamanda

This paper aims to identify the opportunities for them to manage this type of company within the Indonesian context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the opportunities for them to manage this type of company within the Indonesian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper features descriptive multi-case analyses with a qualitative approach being used to gather and analyze data through in-depth interviews with several Indonesian family business owners having experience of succession.

Findings

The participation of women in family business management in several major Indonesian cities is quite extensive, especially for those who are highly educated. Similarly, the benefits of involving women in the management of family businesses are quite high because of their personal traits of patience, fastidiousness, tenacity and thriftiness. What is required is to provide wider access for Indonesian women to corporate management positions, broaden their participation in family businesses, secure a controlling role for women and increase women’s knowledge and skills so as to increase the benefit to family company management and its ability to face global competition.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework demonstrating the various stages of succession planning related to gender equality, which provide women with an opportunity to form the next generation of family business leaders is provided.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2011

Jerry D. VanVactor

The purpose of this paper is to present a collaborative communications model and relate information to succession planning for organizations facing imminent change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a collaborative communications model and relate information to succession planning for organizations facing imminent change.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a review of existent literature, this work examines and expounds upon the impact of planning effectively for transitions between entities.

Findings

The paper presents a collaborative communications model for a manager that is based on four tenets – condition setting, planning, execution, and process evaluation. Within each of these tenets are elements of communication, mentorship, leader development, and acceptance (trust) among stakeholders to ensure two entities transition appropriately.

Practical implications

Key tenets of leadership are often missed when developing strategies for organizational transition. This work examines how communicating collaboratively is linked to succession management and can aid managers in understanding some implications of ill‐developed planning efforts.

Social implications

In an applied sense, this model provides health care managers with concepts related to effective change at both the individual and organizational levels. While this work is directed toward managing transition among health care organizations and personnel, the information is equally applicable to a broader audience.

Originality/value

While there is a dearth of literature examining succession management in a variety of industries, little information is directed specifically toward health care leadership. This paper provides concepts related to effective risk mitigation in succession management.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Tung‐Chun Huang

Succession planning concerns the selection of talented employees to replace senior managers who leave the firm because of retirement, reassignment, or other reasons…

Abstract

Succession planning concerns the selection of talented employees to replace senior managers who leave the firm because of retirement, reassignment, or other reasons. Effective succession planning emphasizes minimizing disruption and dislocation arising from such personnel changes, with a view to implementing business strategy and achieving organizational goals in a smooth and continuous manner. Although succession planning is an essential requirement for the long‐term development and success of business enterprises, previous studies have rarely investigated the empirical relationship between succession programs and human resource outcomes. This study employs empirical data collected from business firms in Taiwan to address that question.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Karien Stadler

The purpose of this article is to discuss succession management within the context of talent management, with specific reference to the role of talent reviews in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to discuss succession management within the context of talent management, with specific reference to the role of talent reviews in the identification, development and retention of potential successors for critical job roles at different organizational levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The article utilizes a case study of talent reviews from a Saudi Arabian mining company, explores the different succession management approaches and highlights emerging best practice solutions in the field. In the case study, the primary task was to evaluate a sample of 59 executives and senior managers against the company's leadership competency framework in order to support them in a structured career development process within the context of the company's talent strategy.

Findings

The main findings indicate that the sample's strategic thinking ability and leadership skills are generally weak and that the current leadership capabilities might not be aligned with the company's growth strategy.

Practical implications

To enhance the talent review process, companies should: apply additional measures to develop a more complete picture of individual capability; fast‐track the talent review process; create a talent score card; review selection practice; determine retention risk by means of a risk‐criticality analyses; and implement individual conversations about performance and career development.

Originality/value

The article has found that talent review is a powerful intervention tool that helps to identify high‐potential employees and future leaders, determine bench strength at a specific level and identify talent gaps, organizational capability and risks. This study contributes to the practice of strategic human resources management with implications for succession management.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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