Search results

1 – 10 of 932
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Alan Coetzer, Janice Redmond and Vern Bastian

The purpose of this paper is to make the case that owner-managers of small businesses should consider using strength-based coaching as a key element of their performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make the case that owner-managers of small businesses should consider using strength-based coaching as a key element of their performance management and learning and development endeavours because small businesses are potentially well-suited to this type of developmental intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

In making the case, we draw on literature primarily in four areas: performance management, positive psychology, strength-based management and small business management. The case for adopting strength-based coaching is also underpinned by the practical insights of an experienced small business manager.

Findings

The informal internal organisation found in most small businesses makes the small business context potentially well-suited to strength-based coaching. In particular, the informal characteristic of small businesses promotes close working relationships between owner-managers and employees and broadly defines work roles. Such a work context is conducive to strength-based coaching that involves owner-managers capitalising on the unique abilities of each employee by redefining work roles to fit employees’ strengths.

Practical implications

Using strength-based coaching to align employees’ strengths with the work of the small business should have positive effects on the key variables of individual and collective performance and ultimately business results. These variables of performance are employee ability, motivation and opportunity to perform.

Originality/value

After database searching, it seems that there is no previous work that has examined the potential efficacy of strength-based coaching in a small business context. The paper has value for small business managers who are seeking practical guidance on how to improve their current approaches to both managing employee performance and fostering the learning and development of the staff.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

David Giles

This article aims to report on the findings from a research project that explored a school’s changing ideological storyline with the appointment of a new Principal and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to report on the findings from a research project that explored a school’s changing ideological storyline with the appointment of a new Principal and the Board of Trustees’ intention to move towards a strengths-based approach to education. Following the school’s dialogue and decision-making over a three-year period enabled the identification of a range of competitive processes between the dominant and an emergent ideology within the school.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an ideological framework proposed by Meighan et al. (2007), the research focussed on the development and maintenance of shared understandings within each ideology. For the purpose of this article, the participants have been limited to those in school governance, the school’s senior leadership team and some teachers across a three-year period. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews, online surveys and informal observations and analysed through interpretive and hermeneutic processes.

Findings

The findings show the subtleties and nuances of two dominant and competing ideologies that represented different philosophies for education: a deficit discourse of progressive ideals and a strengths-based ideology of education. The existing and dominant ideology is challenged by the determination and moral purpose of the principal with the unanimous support from those in governance. In due process, the school emerged into a creative enterprise through the adoption of shared understandings that were underscored by a strengths-based ideology.

Originality/value

It is incumbent upon school principals to notice the shifting organisational storylines within their schools and communities and act in a manner that realises the moral imperative of schooling for the students (Fullan, 2011). This article opens specific ideological processes that have appreciatively moved a school towards pedagogical excellence and a repurposing of the organisation for the students’ sake.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Kelly-Mae Saville, Gurkiran Birdi, Sarah Hayes, Helen Higson and Frank Eperjesi

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the positive academic and professional outcomes for students who undertake degree apprenticeships which use strength-based

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the positive academic and professional outcomes for students who undertake degree apprenticeships which use strength-based approaches in their curriculum and assessment. The design and implementation of programmes of work-based study which focus on an individual’s inherent talents are a new lens for higher education (HE), one that enables institutions to see diverse groups of students fulfil their potential and gain academic qualifications. Strength-based degree apprenticeships offer an effective way to align the needs of industry with the ambitions of individuals who wish to gain university level qualifications whilst in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a mixed-methods approach. Semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in industry and HE were undertaken and thematically analysed. Student data were analysed quantitatively for students in the degree apprenticeship programmes which incorporate a strength-based approach to learning and assessment.

Findings

The findings from this study highlight that the degree apprenticeships’ strength-based curriculum and assessment have spearheaded its success. On average, degree apprentices attain 10 per cent higher grades than students undertaking the same programme through the traditional degree route. Moreover, the module design and tailored support has contributed to over 91 per cent of apprentices graduating with a 2:1 or above.

Research limitations/implications

This research is exploratory in nature, focusing on one university’s experiences and outcomes regarding a strength-based approach curriculum and assessment on degree apprenticeships.

Originality/value

The findings describe how the knowledge exchange and culture of the HE sector has shifted, and the university’s efforts to make progressive relationships with employers. Moreover, this paper describes the challenges in designing curricula and assessing students based on the strengths and skills required for their employment, rather than university mandated learning outcomes. The findings of this paper could influence a strength-based framework for the development of degree apprenticeships in the UK.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

P Linley, Reena Govindji and Michael West

To readers of the popular press, the words ‘positive psychology’ may conjure up images of happiness gurus and people having their feet massaged, their heads resting…

Abstract

To readers of the popular press, the words ‘positive psychology’ may conjure up images of happiness gurus and people having their feet massaged, their heads resting peacefully on pink, fluffy clouds. But in this article, our aim is to demonstrate how the new science of positive psychology speaks powerfully to ‐ and has much to contribute to ‐ the development of leadership and the practices and processes of organisations, whether in the public or private sectors. Much of our work is concerned with the applications of this new field, and particularly with building strengths‐based organisations. A key pillar of this work is around enabling strengths‐based leadership, and provides our focus for this article.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Alex Linley and Nicky Garcea

This article explores how strengths-based recruitment is enabling graduate recruiters to engage, attract and select the best talent. Drawing from the example of major…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores how strengths-based recruitment is enabling graduate recruiters to engage, attract and select the best talent. Drawing from the example of major graduate recruiter, Ernst & Young, it shows how strengths assessment can be used at each stage of the recruitment and selection process.

Design/methodology/approach

Strengths-based recruitment is focused on assessing candidates in relation to their performance and motivation. It identifies what people do well and enjoy doing, relative to the requirements and job-fit of the prospective employer. Strengths are also assessed online as part of a front-end screening process through the situational strengths test. This assesses the strengths candidates have, together with how they would use those strengths in a range of scenarios and situations they would be likely to experience in the role.

Findings

Strengths-based recruitment and the Situational Strengths Test engage candidates by providing them with a realistic job preview of the role. They help candidates to make informed decisions about their own fit with the role. They help organizations to select the candidates who match their requirements more effectively from those who do not, delivering better outcomes for candidates and employers.

Originality/value

Strengths-based recruitment is an engaging recruitment approach that appeals to the Generation Y of current graduates who are focused on the opportunity to use their strengths at work. Ernst & Young has seen improved candidate experience, enhanced business engagement, and better selection outcomes through its use of strengths-based recruitment.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Nicky Garcea, Stephen Isherwood and Alex Linley

This paper sets out to draw comparisons and make linkages between strengths and competency methodologies. Whereas some authors have seen the strengths approach as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to draw comparisons and make linkages between strengths and competency methodologies. Whereas some authors have seen the strengths approach as a revolution in human resources (HR), the authors of this paper see it more as a natural evolution. The paper aims to overview the strengths approach as well as presenting a case study of strengths‐based graduate recruitment from the Big Four professional services firm, Ernst & Young.

Design/methodology/approach

The strengths‐based approach to recruitment is described in general, and the particular approach taken to graduate recruitment at Ernst & Young is outlined. Rather than assessing for generic competencies, strengths‐based recruitment seeks to identify the natural strengths of individuals that are aligned to the role for which they are applying. Assessors are trained to look for energy and authenticity, together with evidence of high performance of the strength.

Findings

The strengths‐based graduate recruitment project at Ernst & Young delivered a 15 percent increase in the number of candidates de‐selected at first interview, together with a 12 percent increase in the number of candidates appointed following assessment center, compared with the previous competency approach.

Practical implications

Strengths‐based graduate recruitment provides a robust and reliable methodology for attracting, selecting and appointing the best candidates for the role. It delivers a better candidate experience and builds a more positive and differentiated employer brand.

Originality/value

Ernst & Young is one of the first UK organizations to use strengths‐based graduate recruitment systematically in this way The strengths methodology not only supports its interviewing and assessment centers, but also is used throughout its campus events and through attraction and candidate engagement with an online strengths tool developed and managed by Capp.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Nicky Garcea, Rebecca Harrison and Alex Linley

The purpose of this article is to set out the ways in which pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim embedded a strengths-based approach to the assessment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to set out the ways in which pharmaceutical company Boehringer Ingelheim embedded a strengths-based approach to the assessment and development of field-based staff during a period of structural and culture change. It provides an overview of how strengths-based methodologies were implemented and embedded through this period. It offers a case study example of how Capp partnered with Boehringer Ingelheim to deliver and cascade its assessment and development solutions. It also provides early evaluation data.

Design/methodology/approach

Boehringer Ingelheim introduced strengths through recruitment and development. It built on Capp's strengths methodology and Realise2 tool and model. To aid implementation, cross functional teams were also set up to cascade knowledge and skills across the organizational system.

Findings

The initial findings from this program include quantitative and qualitative data from candidates and assessors demonstrating their positive perception of the assessment and development process.

Practical implications

This article provides case study material, client learning and tips for how other organizations could introduce strengths-based solutions into similar culture change, team and personal development projects.

Originality/value

Boehringer Ingelheim is one of the first UK based organizations explicitly to take a strengths-based approach to aid culture change.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Sets out ways in which a pharmaceutical company embedded a strengths-based approach to the assessment and development of field-based staff during a period of structural…

Abstract

Purpose

Sets out ways in which a pharmaceutical company embedded a strengths-based approach to the assessment and development of field-based staff during a period of structural and cultural change. Provides an overview of how strengths-based methods were implemented and embedded.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes how collaboration with a people-management consultancy introduced strengths through recruitment and development to the company.

Findings

Relates the positive perception of the assessment and development program by candidates and assessors.

Practical implications

Provides advice for how other organizations could introduce strengths-based solutions into similar culture change, team and personal-development projects.

Originality/value

Points out that the pharmaceutical company – Boehringer Ingelheim – is one of the first UK-based organizations to take a strengths-based approach to aid culture change.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2020

Pete Morgan

This paper aims to stimulate discussion.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to stimulate discussion.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a personal reflection and is not a research paper; there is not therefore a design or methodology that was used in its writing.

Findings

While it may initially appear that a strength-based approach is incompatible with safeguarding adults, it can be a valuable long-term tool in supporting adults who have been abused or self-neglected.

Research limitations/implications

The piece is a personal reflection and therefore not based on research but it does highlight the need for further research to develop tools to facilitate the interface between safeguarding and a strengths-based approach.

Practical implications

The need to recognise when a strengths-based approach is and is not appropriate in safeguarding adults.

Originality/value

The author is not aware of a similar consideration of the interface between safeguarding adults practice and a strengths-based approach.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sebastian Krutkowski

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need for a pedagogical shift from “problems” to “possibilities”, which will help ease the transition of students into higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the need for a pedagogical shift from “problems” to “possibilities”, which will help ease the transition of students into higher education (as well as the transitions between levels of study and employment), especially those coming from under-represented and under-privileged backgrounds, known in the UK as the widening-participation category.

Design/methodology/approach

GSM London is the first higher education provider in the UK to implement a strengths-based approach to staff and student development. This study looks at the delivery plan for strengths-based education, especially how it can inform and reshape information literacy instruction in the library and other academic skills modules.

Findings

Higher education is an important environment to help learners develop their talents into strengths, which can be defined as “the ability to provide consistent and near-perfect performance in a given activity” (Buckingham and Clifton, 2005, p. 20). There is a perception that widening-participation students have more significant gaps or weaknesses upon entering university education. This case study confirms that not remediation but a strengths-based approach has the strongest potential to enable students to better manage their weaknesses and become independent learners.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required, as not enough empirical data could be collected after only one semester of strengths-based learning implementation at GSM.

Originality/value

The author attempts to re-conceptualise information literacy instruction and propose a mapping exercise, in which library instruction is aligned to the principles of strengths-based education and the language of 34 themes in the popular strengths assessment tool from the Gallup organisation. The expectation is to build fluid transitions between levels of study and academic matters and extracurricular activities that students take part in. This approach can also assist learners far beyond the library and long after they leave university, equipping students with a skillset that enables a more meaningful participation in society.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

1 – 10 of 932